Mister Stormalong (A2)

Interesting Facts about Mister Stormalong (A2)

A fine old shanty was Mister Stormalong (A2). Analogically, as in “Lowlands Away”; these shanty sailors were used at the pumps; and also later as a capstan. There are Those who believe it; was built around John Willis- the owner of “Cutty Sark”. But true it is negro origin and of much older vintage than the “Cutty Sark” period.
In Stan Hugill’s book; are described 6 versions of this family. In this particular version are two patterns:

  • Praising the dead seamen,
  • Praising the benevolent son of the dead seamen.

The second pattern; was usually added after the dirge-like regulation stanzas run out. It happens for reason is that work at pumps was a constant job especially od wooden ships; when every change course or trim the sails; the hull was liked literally “everywhere”. I do separate these 2 patterns.
This is the second version, I will do a little “presentation” of work at the leaver “Jiggity-Jig” (older type) pump.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 72).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 72, 74).

The Record of the Mister Stormalong (A2)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Mister Stormalong (A2)

I wisht I wuz Ol Stormy’s son,
– To me way you Stormalong!
I’d build a ship o’ a thousant ton
Aay! Ay.! Ay! Mister Stormalong!

* 2 *

I’d sail this wide world round an’ round,
With plenty o’ money I’d be found..

* 3 *

We’d sail this ol’ world round an’ round,
An’ get hot rum oh, I’ll be bound.

* 4 *

I’d load her up with Jamaicy rum,
An’ all me shellbacks they’d have some.

* 5 *

We’d git our drinks, lads, every man,
With a bleedin’ big bottle for the shantyman.

* 6 *

I’d load ‘er up with grup an’ gin,
An’ stay in the port that we wuz in.

* 7 *

I‘d feed ye well, an’ raise yer pay,
An’ stand ye drinks three times a day.

* 8 *

An’ whin we git to Liverpool Town,
We’ll dance them judies round an’ round.

* 9 *

Oh, Stormalong an’ around we’ll go,
Oh, Stormalong through ice an’ snow.

* 10 *

When Stormy died he made a will,
To give us sailors gin to swill.

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

Mister Stormalong (A1)

Roll The Woodpile Down

Lowlands Away (B)

Mister Stormalong (A1)

Interesting Facts about Mister Stormalong (A1)

A fine old shanty was Mister Stormalong (A1) the same as in “Lowlands Away”. This shanty was originally used at the pumps and later as a capstan. There are stories about that who believe it was built around John Willis- the owner of “Cutty Sark”. But true it is negro origin and of much older vintage the “Cutty Sark” period.

Stan Hugill’s book describes 6 versions of this shanty. In this particular version are two patterns:

  • Praising the dead seamen,
  • Praising the benevolent son of the dead seamen.

Worth noting, that the second pattern was usually added after the dirge-like regulation stanzas run out. The reason why the stanzas run out was: that the work at pumps was a constant job, especially on wooden ships. Each change to the course or trims of the sails caused the leakage literally “everywhere”. I do separate these 2 patterns because in the second version I plan to do a little “presentation” of work at the leaver “Jiggity-Jig” (older type) pump.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 72).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 72, 74).

The Record of the Mister Stormalong (A1)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

mister-stormalong-a1 music notation

The full lyrics

Mister Stormalong (A1)

Old Stormy he is dead and gone,
– To me way you Stormalong!
Old Stormy he is dead and gone,
– Aay! Ay
.! Ay! Mister Stormalong!

* 2 *

Of all ol’ skippers he was best,
But now he’s dead an’ gone to rest.

* 3 *

He slipped his cable off Cape Horn,
Close by the place where he was born.

* 4 *

Oh, off Cape Horn where he was born,
Our sails wuz torn an’ our mainmast gorn.

* 5 *

We’ll dig his grave with a silver spade,
His shroud of finest silk was made.

* 6 *

We lowered him down with a golden chain,
Our eyes all dim with more than rain.

* 7 *

He lies low in his salt-sea [earthen] bed,
Our hearts are sore, our eyes were red.

* 8 *

An able seaman bold an’ true,
A good ol’ skipper [bosun] to his crew.

* 9 *

He’s moored at last an’ furled his sail,
No danger now from wreck or gale.

* 10 *

Old Stormy heard the Angel call,
So sing his dirge now one an’ all.

* 11 *

Oh, now we’ll sing his funeral song,
Oh, roll her over, long an’ strong.

* 12 *

Old Stormy loved a sailors’ song,
Hes voice wuz tough an’ rough an’ strong.

* 13 *

His heart wuz good an’ kind an’ soft,
But now he’s gone ‘way up aloft.

* 14 *

For fifty years he sailed the seas,
In winter gale and summer breeze.

* 15 *

But now Ol’ Stormy’s day is done;
We marked the spot where he is gone.

* 16 *

So we sunk him under with a long, long roll,
Where the sharks’ll have his body an’ the divil have his soul.

* 17 *

An’ so Ol’ Stormy’s day wuz done,
South fifity six, west fifty one.

* 18 *

Ol’ Stormy wuz a seaman bold,
A Grand Ol’ Man o’ the days of old.

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

Mister Stormalong (A2)

Roll The Woodpile Down

Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Low (Halyards)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Low (Halyards)

Another shanty from Lowlands family, but this time is a halyard one. Stan Hugill had Lowlands Low (Halyards), from Old Smith of Tobago, a fine old colored shantyman who gave to Stan a lot of little-known shanties, it was happening in the 30s of the XX century. It is a West-Indian song, according to Sharp, it comes from West Indian Trade (Sugar and Rum).

In this time I did a little presentation with yard pull, as this is a halyard chantey. According to Stan Hugill, it was two hard pulls, and after every pull, the yard goes up a couple of inches. Three sails have been hoisted (those with raising up yards) to be raised in a single mast: Upper Topsail, Upper Topgallant, and Royal, in those sails, were hoisted to the singing of “Halyard Shanties”. It was one of the hardest work on the ship.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 70).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 71, 72).

The Record of the Lowlands Low (Halyards)

“Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 70,71).

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-low-halyards music notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Low (Halyards)

Our packet is the Island Lass,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
There’s a nigger howlin’ at the main top-mast,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!

* 1 *

The Ol’ Man hails from Barbadoes,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
He’s got the name Ol’ Hammertoes,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!

* 2 *

He gives us bread as hard as brass,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
Our junk’s as salt as Balaam’s ass.
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!

* 3 *

The monkey’s rigged in the sijer’s clo’es,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
Where he gottem from God ‘lone knows.
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!

* 4 *

We’ll haul ’em high an’ let ’em dry,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
We’ll rtice ’em up into de sky.
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!

* 5 *

Lowland, me boys, an’ up she goes,
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
Git changed, me boys, to her shore-goin’ clo’es.
– LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!

Related to this sea shanty

A Long Time Ago (A)

As-Tu-Connu Le Per’ Lanc’lot

De Hoffnung

Stormalong, Lads, Stormy

Lowlands or My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

Interesting Facts about My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

This originally pumping shanty, My Dollar An’ A Half A Day was later used as windlass and capstan. This is the Southern States version, Bullen believes it to be of Negro origin, and Whall calls it’ American’, from the cotton ports. “Mr. Perring said this was a ‘typical’ (‘ti’ rhymes with ‘my’) Negro Chantey, sung by Negro sailors in the East India trade, in complaint at their being harder worked and lower-waged than white seamen. Doerflinger disagrees and thinks it is an English song, taken to the Gulf ports by the English and Irish pocket seamen who worked there loading cotton.

Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This “dead lover” pattern one I sing, of four is:
“Later southern States version”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a male”,
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
“The dead lover is a female”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 68, 69). The version I will try to recreate I heard on Stan Hugill’s album – “Aboard the Cutty Sark” (1979).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 68, 69).

The Record of the My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-or-my-dollar-an-a-half-a-day musical notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands (My Dollar An’ A Half A Day)

– Low-lands, Lowlands away my John
– Low-lands away, I heard them say,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 1 *

A dollar an’ a half a day is a (black man) nigers pay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I thought I heard out Old Man say,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 2 *

A white man’s pay is rather high.
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
A black man’s pay is rather low,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 3 *

Five dollars a day is a hoosier’s pay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
Five dollars a day is a hoosier’s pay,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 4 *

A dollar an’ a half a day is mathlow’s pay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
A dollar an’ a half a day won’t pay my way.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 5 *

Ohwhat shall we poor shellbacks do?
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
We’ve got no money an’ we can’t git home.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 6 *

I packet me bag an’ I’m bound away,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I’m bound away for Mobile Bay.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 7 *

We’re bound away for Mobile Bay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
We’re bound away at the break o’ day.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 8 *

Oh, say wuz ye never down in Mobile Bay?
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
A-screwin’ cotton all the day.
– My Dollar an’ a half, a day.

* 9 *

Oh, me poor ol’ mother, oh, she wrote to me,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
She wrote to me to come home from sea.
– My Dollar an’ a half, a day.

* 10 *

We’ll heave ‘er up from down below,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
Oh, heave ‘er up an’ away we’ll go!
– My .
..

* 11 *

Oh, I though I heard the Ol’ Man say,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
He’d give us rum three times a day.
– My .
..

* 12 *

I wish I had ten thousand pound,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I’d steer me ship for miles around.
– My .
..

* 13 *

I’d load her up with grub an’ gin,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
An’ stay in the port where we wuz in.
– My .
..

* 14 *

I’d stand ye drinks three times a day,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
An’ feel ye well am’ raise yer pay.
– My .
..

* 15 *

With a bully ship an’ a bully crew,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
An’ a bucko skipper for to kick her through.
– My .
..

* 16 *

Oh, I wished I wuz in Liverpool Town,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
With them Liverpool judies I’d dance around.
– My …

* 17 *

Wake up, yer bitch, an’ let us in,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
Wake up, yer bitch, cos we want some gin.
– My …

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Away (B)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Away (B) originally a pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular.
Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.


This “dead lover” pattern one I sing, of four is:
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a female”,
“The dead lover is a male”
“Later southern States version”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 66). This version has also slightly different hours, I did change it just to seek of trying out some different.

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 67). This version has also slightly different hours, I did change it just to seek of trying out some different.

The Record of the Lowlands Away (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-away-b musical notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Away (B)

– Lowlaands, Lowlands, hurrah my Jo!
– Lowlands, high, Lowlands, alay!
– My Lowlands away!

* 1 *

I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– Low-lands, Lowlands, hurrah my Jo!
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– Lowlands, alay!

* 2 *

I dreamt I saw my own true love,
She flew to me like some young dove

* 3 *

This maid she stood close by my side,
All dressed in white like some fair bride.

* 4 *

She spoke in accents sweet an’ low.
I love you, dear, this well you know.’

* 5 *

And, then I sang in sweetest voice,
That song which made my heart rejoice.

* 6 *

Oh, Lowlands maids are fair an’ true,
This Lowlands maid she loves you too.

* 7 *

And Lowlands men are strong an’ brave:
The one I love sails o’er the wave.

* 8 *

I held her in my fond embrace,
And kissed her sweet an’ shinin’ face.

* 9 *

And-then awoke to her the cry,
‘Rouse out the watch, ho! watch ahoy!’

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Strangely Enough, c.F. Smith gives Lowlands Away (A) (ii) it as halyard shanty, It is maybe because it doesn’t have a grand chorus, and in Stans Hugill’s theory from -“The Bosuns Locker” book, is that four-line construction – two solos and two intermittent refrains (more details you can find there).

Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This “dead lover” pattern one I sing, of four is:
“The dead lover is a female”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a male”,
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
“Later southern States version”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 65).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 66, 67).

The Record of the Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-away-a-ii music notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

– Low-lands, Lowlands, away, my John,
– Lowlands away I heard them say,
– My Lowlands away.

* 1 *

I dreamed a dream the other night,
– Lowlands, Lowlands, away, my John.
My love she came dressed all in white,
– My Lowlands away.

* 2 *

I dreamed my love came in my sleep,
Her cheeks were wet, her eyes did weep.

* 3 *

She came to me as my best bride (at mt bed-side),
All dressed in white like some fair bride.

* 4 *

And bravely in her bosom fair,
A red, red rose did my love wear.

* 5 *

She made no sound-no word she said,
And then I knew my love was dead.

* 6 *

I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.

* 7 *

She waved her hand-she said goodbye,
I wiped the tear from out my eye.

* 8 *

And then awoke to hear the cry,
‘Oh, watch on deck, oh, watch ahoy!’

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Lowlands Away (A) (i) was originally a pumping shanty; also later used as a windlass and capstan shanty. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular. Terry, claims that after the China clipper era it was seldom heard.
Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.

This “dead lover” pattern one I sing of four is:
“The dead lover is a male”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a female”,
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
“Later southern States version”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 65).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 65, 66).

The Record of the Lowlands Away (A) (i)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-away-a-i music notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

– Low-lands Lowlands, away my John!
– Lowlands, Away I heard them say,
– [My] Lowlands, away!

* 1 *

I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– Lowlands , Lowlands, away my John!
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– [My] Lowlands, away!

* 2 *

I dreamt I saw my own true love,
He stood so still, he did not move,

* 3 *

I knew my love was drowned and dead,
He stood so still, no word he said.

* 4 *

All dank his hair, all dim his eye,
I knew that he had said goodbye.

* 5 *

All green and wet with weeds so cold,
Around his form green weeds had hold.

* 6 *

I’m drowned in the Lowland Seas,’ he said,
‘Oh, you an’ I will ne’er be wed.’

* 7 *

I shall never kiss you more,’ he said,
‘Never kiss you more — for I am dead.’

* 8 *

I will cut my breasts until they bleed.’
His form had gone — in the green weed.

* 9 *

I will cut away my bonnie hair,
No other man will think me fair.’

* 10 *

I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.

* 11 *

My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,
My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Lowlands Away (B)

The Lowlands Low (C)

Interesting Facts about The Lowlands Low (C)

The Lowlands Low (C) is a slightly more modern version This is much the same tune as Bullen Gives. In all three versions, the words are very similar. But the name of the ship differs widely; some versions give the “Gold China Tree”, or the “Marry Golden Tree”; others have the “Weep Willow Tree”, “Golden Willow Tree”, and “Sweet Trinitee”. Also, the pirate ship has various names: the “Turkish [or Spanish] Canoe”, the “Turkish Roveree”, and “Spanish Gahalee” being.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 64). The is sung as a pump shanty.

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63 width version modifications).

The Record of The Lowlands Low (C)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-lowlands-low-c musical notation

The full lyrics

The Lowlands Low (C)

Oh, there was a lofty ship boys, an’ she put aut to sea
An’ she goes by the name of the Golden Vanitee
An’ we feared she would be taken by a spanish piratee
– as we sailed along the lowlands, lowlands
– as we sailed along the lowlands low!

* 2 *

Oh, we had aboard o’ us a little cabin-boy
Who said, – “What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?”
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 3 *

‘Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I’ll give to thee galore,
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 4 *

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An’ he swam until he came to the rascal pirate’s side
He climbed on the deck an’ went below, by none was he espied
– And he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 5 *

He bore with his auger, he bored once an’ twice
And some were playin’ cards an’ some were playin’ dice
An’ water flowed in an’ dazzled their eyes
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 6 *

Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an’ some were playin’ dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin’ with their wives
An’ then he let the water in an’ put out all their lights
– And he sank her in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank her in the lowlands low!

* 7 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim o’er to the starboard side
Sayin’ – “Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide.”
“I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
– I wiill sink ye in the lowlands, lowlands
– I-will sink ye in the lowlands Low!

* 8 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin’ – “Shipmates take me up for I’m drowinin’ with the tide.”
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
– And they buried him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And they buried him in the lowlands low!

* 9 *

‘And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o’er him, and they dropped him in the tide
– And they sailed from the lowlands, lowlands
– And they sailed from the lowlands low!

* 10 *

Here’s a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
– And to leave him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And to leave him in the lowlands low!

Related to The Lowlands Low (C)

A-Rovin’ (A)

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

The Lowlands Low (B)

Interesting Facts about The Lowlands Low (B)

This version of The Lowlands Low (B), Stan Hugill had from his shipmate Jack Birch of Plymouth. This song is known as “Lowlands”, “The Lowland Sea”, “The Golden Vanitee”, or “The Lowlands Low” and seems to have been based on a ballad of the seventeenth century entitled “Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing in the Lowlands”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 64).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63).

The Record of The Lowlands Low (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-lowlands-low-b musical notation

The full lyrics

The Lowlands Low (B)

There was a lofty ship boys, an’ she put aut to sea
An’ she goes by the name of the Golden Vanitee
An’ we thought she would be taken by the spanish piratee
– as we sailed along the lowlands, lowlands
– as we sailed along the lowlands low!

* 2 *

Oh, we had aboard o’ us a little cabin-boy
Who said, – “What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?”
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 3 *

‘Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I’ll give to thee galore,
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 4 *

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An’ he swam until he came to the rascal pirate’s side
He climbed on the deck an’ went below, by none was he espied
– And he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 5 *

He bore with his auger, he bored once an’ twice
And some were playin’ cards an’ some were playin’ dice
An’ water flowed in an’ dazzled their eyes
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 6 *

Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an’ some were playin’ dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin’ with their wives
An’ then he let the water in an’ put out all their lights
– And he sank her in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank her in the lowlands low!

* 7 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim o’er to the starboard side
Sayin’ – “Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide.”
“I will ink ye, I will kill ye if ye claim my child as bride,
– Ii will sink ye in the lowlands, lowlands
– I will sink ye in the lowlands Low!

* 8 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin’ – “Shipmates take me up for I’m drowinin’ with the tide.”
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
– And they buried him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And they buried him in the lowlands low!

* 9 *

‘And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o’er him, and they dropped him in the tide
– And they sailed from the lowlands, lowlands
– And they sailed from the lowlands low!

* 10 *

Here’s a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
– And to leave him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And to leave him in the lowlands low!

Related to this sea shanty

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The Lowlands Low (A)

Interesting Facts about The Lowlands Low (A)

The lilt of the word ‘Lowlands’ seemed to have a fascination for the shantyman and sailor in general. A very ancient song of the sea sings of the Lowlands of Holland, those of Scottland, and even the Lowlands of Virginia were all woven into the songs of the shantyman. Stan Hugill mentioned that Capitan Davis (“Sailors’ Songs and Shanties” – 1887) gives it as a shanty, but Stan Hugill and many of his shipmates have sung this old song at both capstan and pumps.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63). I will try to recreate is capstan, and I heard it on Stan Hugill’s album – “A Salty Fore Topman” (1989).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63).

The Record of The Lowlands Low (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-lowlands-low-a musical notation

The full lyrics

The Lowlands Low (A)

There once was a skipper who was boastin’ on the quay,
Oh, I have a ship and a gallant ship is she,
Of all the ships I know. She is far the best to me,
an’ she’s sailing in the Low-lands, Low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, she’s sailing in the, Lowlands Low!

* 2 *

Oh, I had her built in the North a-counterie,
And I have her christened The “Golden Vanitee”.
I armed her and I manned her an’ I sent her off to sea
And she’s sailing in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and she’s sailing in the.
..

* 3 *

Then up spoke a sailor who had just returned from sea
‘Oh, I wuz aboard of the “Golden Vanitee”
When she wuz held in chase by a Spanish piratee
And we sank her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and we sank her in the.
..

* 4 *

Oh, we had aboard o’ us a little cabin-boy
Who said, – “What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?”
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
If ye sink her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, if ye sink her in the.
..

* 5 *

‘Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I’ll give to thee galore,
If ye sink her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low
lands, Lowlands, if ye sink her in the...

* 6 *

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An’ he swam until he came to the rascal pirate’s side
He climbed on the deck an’ went below, by none was he espied
And he sank’em in the low
lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and he sank’em in the.
..

* 7 *

He bore with his auger, he bored once an’ twice
And some were playin’ cards an’ some were playin’ dice
An’ water flowed in an’ dazzled their eyes
An’ he sank’em in the low
lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, an’ he sank’em in the.
..

* 8 *

Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an’ some were playin’ dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin’ with their wives
An’ then he let the water in an’ put out all their lights
And he sank her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and he sank her in the.
..

* 9 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim o’er to the starboard side
Sayin’ – “Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide.”
“I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
I will sink ye in the low-lands, low.”
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, I will sink ye in the.
..

Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin’ – “Shipmates take me up for I’m drowinin’ with the tide.”
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
And they buried him in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and they buried him in the

* 11 *

‘And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o’er him, and they dropped him in the tide
And they sailed from the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and they sailed from the

* 12 *

Here’s a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
And to leave him in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low
lands, Lowlands, and to leave him in the ...

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