Sing Sally O! (version A)

Interesting Facts about the Sing Sally O! (version A)

“Sing Sally O! (version A)” is a song which has two versions, capstan and halyard. Both versions Stan Hugill have from Harding Barbadian, who declared they were both used ‘ashore’ in the West Indies for any job where a work-song was needed.

There is some additional historical documentation of this song from my mentor Gibb Schreffler.

In an 1864 book, a woman wrote that “many years ago” she heard Black men near Charleston, South Carolina rowing a boat with the song,

“Ole maum Dinah, she hab ‘leben chillen,
Fol de rol de ri, oh, fol de rol de ray.
One he was a stevedore, an ‘toder was a barber,
Fol de rol de ri, oh, fol de rol de ray.
Wid a head like a tin pan, a back like a crowbar,
Fol de rol de ri, oh, fol de rol de ray.
He done row dis boat so bad, boys, he could n’t make it go far,
Fol de rol de ri, oh, fol de rol de ray.
And it’s hurrah! massa barber, wen did you get to Charleston,
Fol de rol de ri, oh, fol de rol de ray.
An he row to de landin’, wid tank you berry much, sar,
Fol de rol de ri, oh, fol de rol de ray.”

In an American whaling ship journal from 1852, the sailors mention that some people were singing,
“hura hura for old marm dinah.”

A recording of the version was made in 1962 in Anguilla (A Caribbean island):

https://archive.culturalequity.org/field-work/caribbean-1962/south-hill-village-762/oh-mother-dinah

Oh Mother Dinah | Lomax Digital Archive

The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 388).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 388, 389).

The Record of the Sing Sally O! (version A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Sing Sally O! (version A) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Sing Sally O! (version A) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Sing Sally O! (version A)

Good mornin’ Mudder Dinah,
I wander what’s the matter?

– Sing, Sally-O! an’ a fol-lol-day!
– Hurraw, hurraw, me bully boys,
– For ol’ Mudder Dinah,
– Sing, Sally-O! an’ a fol-lol-day!

* 2 *

As she went down to the market,
She met her high brown sailor boy,

* 3 *

An’ now he’s gone an’ left her,
That man who was her keeper,

* 4 *

But still she loves all sailors,
She buys ’em rum an’ ter-bac-ker.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Spanish Ladies B

Interesting Facts about the Spanish Ladies B

“Spanish Ladies B” old naval song, only Stan Hugill and Captain Frank Shaw were writers who call this beautiful song the shanty. Hugill tells us it was the homeward-bound song sung at the capstan. This song has two tunes – the livelier and faster one being preferred by the later generation of sailing-ship men. Both versions including this one, Stan Hugill took from his father.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 386).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 386).

The Record of the Spanish Ladies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Spanish Ladies B - Capstan Shanties

The musical notation

And the full lyrics

Spanish Ladies B

Farewell an’ adieu to you fair Spanish ladies,
Farewell an’ adieu to you ladies of Spain,
For we’ve received orders for to sail for old England,
An’ hope very shortly to see you again.

– We’ll rant an’ we’ll roar, like true British sailors,
– We’ll rant an’ we’ll rave across the salt seas,
– Till we strike soundings in the Channel of Old England,
– 
From Ushant to Scilly is thirty-four leagues.

* 2 *

We hove our ship to, with the wind at sou’west, boys,
We hove our ship to for to take soundings clear.
In fifty-five fathoms with a fine sandy bottom,
We filled our maintops’l, up Channel did steer.

* 3 *

The first land we made was a point called the Deadman,
Next Ramshead off Plymouth, Start, Portland, and Wight.
We sailed then by Beachie, by Fairlee and Dover,
Then bore straight away for the South Foreland Light.

* 4 *

Now the signal was made for the Grand Fleet to anchor,
We clewed up our tops’ls, stuck out tacks and sheets.
We stood by our stoppers, we brailed in our spankers,
And anchored ahead of the noblest of fleets.

* 5 *

Let every man here drink up his full bumper,
Let every man here drink up his full bowl,
And let us be jolly and drown melancholy,
Drink a health to each jovial an’ true-hearted soul.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Spanish Ladies A

Interesting Facts about the Spanish Ladies A

“Spanish Ladies A” old naval song, only Stan Hugill and Captain Frank Shaw were writers who call this beautiful song the shanty. Hugill tells us it was the homeward-bound song sung at the capstan. This song has two tunes – the livelier and faster one being preferred by the later generation of sailing-ship men. Both versions including this one, Stan Hugill took from his father.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 385).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 385).

The Record of the Spanish Ladies A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Spanish Ladies A - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Spanish Ladies A - music notation

And the full lyrics

Spanish Ladies A

Farewell an’ adieu to you fair Spanish ladies,
Farewell an’ adieu to you ladies of Spain,
For we’ve received orders for to sail for old England,
An’ hope very shortly to see you again.

– We’ll rant an’ we’ll roar, like true British sailors,
– We’ll rant an’ we’ll rave across the salt seas,
– Till we strike soundings in the Channel of Old England,
From Ushant to Scilly is thirty-four leagues.

* 2 *

We hove our ship to, with the wind at sou’west, boys,
We hove our ship to for to take soundings clear.
In fifty-five fathoms with a fine sandy bottom,
We filled our maintops’l, up Channel did steer.

* 3 *

The first land we made was a point called the Deadman,
Next Ramshead off Plymouth, Start, Portland, and Wight.
We sailed then by Beachie, by Fairlee and Dover,
Then bore straight away for the South Foreland Light.

* 4 *

Now the signal was made for the Grand Fleet to anchor,
We clewed up our tops’ls, stuck out tacks and sheets.
We stood by our stoppers, we brailed in our spankers,
And anchored ahead of the noblest of fleets.

* 5 *

Let every man here drink up his full bumper,
Let every man here drink up his full bowl,
And let us be jolly and drown melancholy,
Drink a health to each jovial an’ true-hearted soul.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

Interesting Facts about the Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

“Whip Jamboree (Sharp)” is the capstan shanty. This version comes from ““English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 10). According to Sharp:
“there are no other versions of this chantey except one, in the major mode, given me by Mr. George Conway. The tune which is Eolian mode is a variant of Santy Anna (No I).In this construction, and to some extent in the character of its words, the chantey is asking to ‘Spanish Ladies’ (Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 124). The words of the chorus show negro influence. The Rock Light is in Cheshire, at the mouth of the Mersey. “Old Dan Lowerie’s,” Mr. Short said, was a popular playhouse in Paradise Street, Liverpool, near the Waterloo Dock, much frequent by sailors.”
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 10).
The lyrics: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 10).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 384).

The Record of the Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Whip Jamboree (Sharp) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Whip Jamboree (Sharp) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

Now, Cape Clear it is in … sight,
We’ll be off Holyhead by tomorrow night,
And we’ll shape our course for the Rock Light;
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

– Whip jamboree, Whip jamboree,
– Oh you longtailed black man, poke it up behind me.
– Whip jamboree, Whip jamboree,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 2 *

Now, my lads, we’re round the Rock,
All hammocks lashed and chests all locked,
We’ll haul her into the Waterloo Dock,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 3 *

Now, my lads, we’re all in dock
We’ll be off to Dan Lowrie’s on the spot;
And now we’ll have a good roundabout.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

 Post Views: 50

Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

Interesting Facts about the Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

“Whoop Jamboree (Terry)” is the capstan shanty. This version comes from “The Shanty Book Part II” (1926) by Richard Runciman Terry. Terry heard this song from the shantyman known as – Mr. Short of Watchet, Somerset. Terry in the description of the song gives us a hint about how to sing the word “whoop”, he says: “The word as ‘coughed up’ by Mr. Short (with a shock of the glottis) sounded more like ‘Whup'”.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.
The lyrics: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 383, 384).

The Record of the Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Whoop Jamboree (Terry) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Whoop Jamboree (Terry) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

Now, my lads, be of good cheer,
For the Irish land will soon draw near.
In a few days more we’ll sight Cape Clear.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

– Whoop jamboree, whoop jamboree,
– Oh you longtailed black man, poke it up behind.
– Whoop jamboree, whoop jamboree,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 2 *

Now Cape Clear it is in sight,
We’ll be off Holyhead by to-morrow night;
And we’ll shape our course for the Rock Light,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 3 *

Now, my lads, we’re round the Rock,
All hammocks lashed and chests all locked.
We’ll haul her into the Waterloo dock.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 4 *

Now, my lads, we’re all in dock,
We’ll be off to Dan Lowries’s on the spot;
And now we’ll have a good roundabout.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Jamboree (Whall)

Interesting Facts about the Jamboree (Whall)

“Jamboree (Whall)” is the capstan shanty. In the time when Stan Hugill wrote his book, swear words or “bawdy words” was not acceptable for print, so in any case “words” has to be camouflaged. As we know from his book, this song was very difficult to camouflage. According to the “last leaving shantymen” this song also breaks another theory that shanties contain unprintable words only in solos, here the final and noisiest line of the chorus is unprintable! This version Stan Hugill called: this “The London Version”, and gave the comment that is much the same as Whall’s, in fact, Whallalso in his book calls it the “London Version”. So probably to unify this case I will use Whall’s version and music, due to the Hugill giving us only text which is almost identical. The music is original from Whall.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by William Boultbee Whall (6th extended edition 1927).
The lyrics: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by William Boultbee Whall (6th extended edition 1927).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 383).

The Record of the Jamboree (Whall)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Jamboree (Whall) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Jamboree (Whall)

The pilot he looks out ahead,
O a hand in the chains, O a heaving of the lead!
The union Jack at our masthead,
– O I wonder if my clothes are out of pawn!

– Oh, Jamboree, Oh Jamboree,
– O its get away, you black man, don’t you come a-night me!
– Oh, Jamboree, Oh Jamboree,
– O I wonder if my clothes are out of pawn!

* 2 *

O it’s now we’re past o’ the Lizard lights,
The Start, boys, next will have in sight;
We’ll soon be abreast of the Isle of Wight;
O I wonder if my clothes are o’ pawn.

* 3 *

O when we get to the Blackwall docks,
The pretty young girls come down in flocks,
Some in their petticoats and some in frocks;
O I wonder if my clothes are o’ pawn.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Doodle Let Me Go

Interesting Facts about the Doodle Let Me Go

“Doodle Let Me Go” is the capstan shanty. According to Stan Hugill probably related to “Do Let Me Go Susan”. Terry says that the word “Do” was sometimes sung as “doodle”. This version is version comes from Harding Barbadian, a shipmate of Stan Hugill.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the Capstan Shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 380).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 380, 381).

The Record of this shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Doodle Let Me Go - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Doodle Let Me Go - music notation

And the full lyrics

Doodle Let Me Go

Oh, once I met a dou-dou fair, belonged to Mobile Bay,
– Hooraw, me yaller gels, doodle let me go!
– Doodle let me go, gels,
– Doodle let me go.
– Hooraw, me yaller gels,
– doodle let me go!

* 2 *

She swung her lip, she tripped her feet, she winked her sassy eye,
– Hooraw …

* 3 *

Ah took her in an’ gave her gin, an’ danced her on the floor,
– Hooraw …

* 4 *

The crew is drunk, the mate is drunk, the Old Man’s got a load,
– Hooraw …

Related to this sea shanty

Rio Grande (F)

Bound for the Rio Grande (R. R. Terry’s Version)

Rio Grande (A. Connan Doyle version)

The New York Gals

Interesting Facts about The New York Gals

“The New York Gals” was a popular capstan shanty on both American and British ships. This is the last version described by Stan Hugill in his “Shanties from the Seven Seas”. Stan Hugill claims this version is “probably” the oldest one, and he dated it before the thirties of the nineteen century. The version has been taken from Irish seamen by the name of Spike Sennit, a man who had sailed for years in Yankee windbags. Also worth mention a note from stan Hugill’s description that the place name Shanghai used in the song is pronounced in the way old-time seamen used to say it – “Shanghee”.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 374).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 374-375).

The Record of The New York Gals

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The New York Gals - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The New York Gals - music notation

The full lyrics

The New York Gals

As I rolled down ol’ South Street,
A fair maid I did meet,
Who axed me then to see her home,
She lived down Fourteenth Street,

– An’ away, you Johnny
– My dear honey.
– Oh, you New York gals,
– Ye love us for our money.

* 2 *

Sez I, ‘My dear young lady,
I’m a stranger here in town,
I left me ship only yesterday,
From China I am bound,’

* 3 *

‘Now come wid me, me dearie,
An’ I will stand ye treat,
I’ll buy ye rum an’ brandy, dear,
An’ tabnabs for to eat.’

* 4 *

‘My friend she has a brother,
Just now away at sea,
The last time that she heard from him,
His ship was in Shanghee.’

* 5 *

When we got down to Fourteenth Street,
We stopped at Number Four,
Her mother and her sister came
To meet us at the door.

* 6 *

An’ when we got inside the house,
The drinks wuz handed round.
The liquor wuz so awful strong,
Me head went round an’ round.

* 7 *

Before we all sat down to eat,
We had another drink.
THe liquor wuz so very strong,
Deep sleep came in a wink.

* 8 *

When I awoke next morning,
I had an achin’ head,
An’ there wuz I Jack-all-alone,
Stark naked on the bed.

* 9 *

My gold watch an’ me pocket-book
An’ lady friend wuz gone.
An’ there wuz I with nary a stich,
All left there on me own.

* 10 *

On lookin’ all around the room,
Oh, nothing could I see,
But a lady’s shift an’ pantaloons,
Not worth a damn to me.

* 11 *

With a flour for a suit,
I wisht I’d ne’er bin born.
A boarding master then I met,
Who shipped me round the Horn.

* 12 *

Now all ye bully sailormen,
Take warnin’ when ashore,
Or else ye’ll meet some charmin’ gal,
Who’s nothing but a whore.

* 13 *

Yer hard-earned cash will disappear,
Your rig an’ boots as well,
For Yankee gals are tougher than
The other side o’ Hell!

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version)

Interesting Facts about the Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version)

“Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version)” was a popular capstan shanty on both American and British ships. This version comes from “A Book Of Shanties” by Cicely Fox Smith (1927), Stan Hugill mention this version because he recognized different melodies in the verse. Her description of this beautiful song given by Cicely Fox Smith:
“This is, of course, a song of the Liverpool emigrant days. Mr. Tapscott, whose name occurs in several shanties, was the Liverpool agent for some of the American packet companies. The name of the ship varies according to the singer’s fancy–sometimes the “Henry Clay” is given, sometimes another–and the name of the dock, too, is not always the same.”
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of the Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version)

The music: “A Book Of Shanties” by Cicely Fox Smith (1927) (1st ed p 68).
The lyrics: “A Book Of Shanties” by Cicely Fox Smith (1927) (1st ed p 67 – 69).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 373).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version) - music notation

The full lyrics

Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version)

One day as I went walking
Down by the Clarence Dock,
It was there I spied an Irish girl
Conversing with Tapscott!

– And away, you santy,
– My dear honey,
– Oh! you New York girls,
– Can’t you dance the polka!

* 2 *

“Good morning, Mr. Tapscott!
Good morning, Sir,” said she,
“And have you got a packet ship
To carry me across the sea?”

* 3 *

“Oh yes,” said Mr. Tapscott,
“I have ships of mighty fame,
And one now in the Waterloo Dock,
And the ‘Dreadnought’ is her name.”

* 4 *

Oh my flash man is a packet rat,
He sails in the Black Ball Line,
And he’s a saucy son of a gun
That will hurt that man of mine.

* 5 *

I went to the Fulton ferry
But I couldn’t get acress,
So I jumped on the back of a ferryboat man
And rode him like a hoss!

Related to this sea shanty

Paddy Signs On

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

Cant Ye Dance The Polka B

Interesting Facts about the Cant Ye Dance The Polka B

“Cant Ye Dance The Polka B” was a popular capstan shanty on both American and British ships. This is as Stan Hugill described the normal Packet Rat version – usually sung in a Yankee drawl.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty (used at the Halyard winch).

The source of the Cant Ye Dance The Polka B

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 372).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 372-373).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Cant Ye Dance The Polka B - Capstan Shanty (used at halyard winch)

The musical notation

Cant Ye Dance The Polka B - music notation

The full lyrics

Cant Ye Dance The Polka B

Tis I walked down the Broadway.
One evenin’ in July,
I met a maid who axed me trade,
an’ a Sailor John, sez I …

– Than away you Santee,
– My dear Annie!
– Ooooh, ye New York gals,
– Can’t ye dance the polka?

* 2 *

To tiffany’s I took her,
I did not mind expense,
I bought her two gold earrings,
An’ they cost me fifteen cents.

* 3 *

Sez she, ‘You Limejuice sailor,
Now see me home you may.’-
But when we reached her cottage door,
She this to me did say.

* 4 *

My flash man he’s a Yankee,
Wid his hair cut short behind,
He wears a pair o’ long sea-boots,
An’ he sails in the Blackball Line.

* 5 *

He’s homeward bound this evening,
An’ wid me he will stay.
So git a move on, sailor-boy,
Git crackin’ on year way.

* 6 *

Si I kissed her hard an’ proper,
Afore her flash man came,
An’ fare-ye-well, me Bowery gel,
I know yer little game.

* 7 *

I wrapped me glad rags round me,
An’ to the docks did steer.
I’ll never court another maid,
I’ll stick to rum an’ beer.

* 8 *

I joined a Yankee blood-boat,
An’ sailed away next morn.
Don’t ever fool around wid gals,
Yer safer off Cape Horn!

Related to this sea shanty

Roller Bowler – Liverpool Version

Good Mornin Ladies All A

Haul The Bowline B