Heave Away – American Folk Song

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away

“Heave Away” the song from “The American Songbag” by Carl Sandburg (1927 page 407), is another clue to finding the possible origin of the “Heave Away, My Johnnies” shanty. Stan Hugill on the occasion of this song debated with himself about the shanty having stemmed from the following Negro slave song “Heave Away”. Although the tune bears no resemblance to the shanty the words seem to have some connection. Perhaps this is one of the songs that made it through the shanties of Mobile Bay or New Orleans. But on the other hand, it may be that Negro Hoosiers took it from Irish seamen-stevedores. Carl Sandburg claims that the following song is a “negro fireman’s” song and is one of the “few slavery-era work songs still in existence”.

The source of  the Heave Away

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 301).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 301).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away - music notation

The full lyrics

Heave Away

Heave away, he-ave away!
I’d rather court a yellow gal
Than work for Henry Clay,
He
ave away, heave away!
Yellow gal, I want to go.
I’d rather court a yellow gal
Than work for Henry Clay.
He
ave away! Yellow gal, I want to go!

Related to this song

Lay Me Down – Folk Song

Hieland Laddie (B) – stevedores chant

The Powder Monkey – Shore Sea-Song

The Irish Emigrant – Irish Folk Song

Interesting Facts about The Irish Emigrant

“The Irish Emigrant” is the final piece of Stan Hugill’s research on the very fine shanty “Heave Away, My Johnnies”. After the “Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )” which comes from Mr. T. E. Elwell. Eventually, the full version he took from his Irish friend; a native of Wexford, turned up the full version, which his friend called “The Irish Emigrant”.
And eventually the story of the trick used by Mr. Tapscott to use the word ‘meal’. The words pronounced in Irish fashion sounded like ‘mail’, giving rise to the belief that the ship concerned was carrying ‘mail’ and belonged to the fastest in the world smart packet ships. But in actual fact, these ships carried emigrants across to the New World were very often a real thirt-rates, and the food the poor Irish emigrants had daily was “meal” – the Irish pronunciation of which was “male”, hence the error.

The source of The Irish Emigrant

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 299).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 300, 301).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Irish Emigrant - music notation

The full lyrics

The Irish Emigrant

As I walked out one morning down by the Clarence Dock,
I heard a bully Irish boy conversing wid Tapscott;
‘Good morning, Mister Tapscott, would ye be arter telling me,
If ye’ve got a ship bound for New York in the state of Amerikee?’

– Lay me down, lay me down,
– Lay me down do!
– Lay me down, here we go, Mrs. McQuale,
– Here we go to, lay me down, Mrs. O’Halligan,
– Jinny hooraw!
– Fire away, Bridget, I’ll bully for you!

* 2 *

‘Yes, yes, me handsome Irish boy, I’ve got a ship or two,
One’s laying at the wharf there, awaitin’ for her crew,
She is a handsome packet and on Friday she will sail,
And now she’s takin’ her on board a thousand bags o’ meal.’

* 3 *

So then I paid me passage down in solid Irish gold,
And when the packet sailed, boys, ’twas on the yellow grog road;
There was roars of milly murder, the loikes wuz never known,
An’ ev’ry mother’s son, me bhoys, did wish himself at home.

* 4 *

On the day on which we set out, ’twas on the first o’ May,
The Capen came upon the deck, these words to us did say,
‘Cheer up, me beefy Irish bhoys, now we have set all sail,
We’ll give ye a feed o’ pork an’ beans, tomorrow — yellow meal!’

* 5 *

Next day when we sailin’ down the channel right as rain,
A nor’west wind began to blow, an’ druv us back again.
Bad luck to the Joey Walker and the day that we set sail,
For them packet sailors broken open me chest, an’ stole me yellow meal.

* 6 *

Now that I am in Amerikee, a-working on a canal,
I’ll niver go home in a packet ship, I know I niver shall,
But I’ll ship in a darn big National boat, that carries both steam an’ sail,
With lashin’s o’ beef, an’ plenty to eat, an’ none of yer yellow meal.

Related to this victorian ditty

The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns (Victorian Ditty)

Lay Me Down – Folk Song

Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )

Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )

Interesting Facts about the Lay Me Down

“Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )” is the piece of Stan Hugill’s research on the very fine shanty “Heave Away, My Johnnies”. Stan Hugill tells us about he came across a letter referring to the three songs popular in Liverpool ‘free-‘n’-easies’ during the middle of the XIX century, one of these three songs was a ditty: “Across The Western Ocean. Stan Hugill found the author of this letter Mr. T. E. Elwell of the Isle of Man, the result of the correspondence was this verse with the chorus.

Stan Hugill doesn’t mention the melody for this ditty, but I expect the melody to this ditty comes from the song that predeceases this song in Stan Hugill’s book, which is “Lay Me Down”, so this melody I will use, to reconstruct that beautiful lyric, and will try to turn into a song. The lyrics in some places didn’t match the melody sometimes the length of the phrases is too short, so I will try to repeat some fragments of the phrases to match the music notation and not do much harm to the original climate of the lyrics.

The source of  this song

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 299).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 300).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Across The Western Ocean ( 2 ) - music notation

The full lyrics

Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )

‘Have you got an emigrant ship that’s bound for Amer-i-kay?’
‘Oh, yes! I have an emigrant ship,
I have got one or two;
I’ve got the Georgie Walker and I’ve got the Kangaroo.

– Oh! here we go, there we go,
– Lay me down do,
– Here we go, there we go,
– Mrs. O’Halligan, too,
– Jenny, hooroo!
– Fire away, laddie, I’ll bully for you!

Related to this victorian ditty

Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

Brindisi Di Marinai

Blow The Wind Southerly – Shore Song

Lay Me Down – Folk Song

Interesting Facts about the Lay Me Down

“Lay Me Down” is the folk song that Stan Hugill acquired from Patrick Shuldam-Shaw. Shuldam-Shaw did not mention exactly when, but what he says: “is when he did the talk about sea shanties in the Cecil Sharp House London”. He met Patrick Shuldam-Shaw and was on the lookout for some personal evidence of the song “Yellow Meal”, He mentioned the matter to him. Shuldam-Shaw said that; on one of his visits to the Shetland Islands collecting folk songs; and take down such a song from the singing of a certain John Stickle of Balla Sound, but he called it “Lay Me Down”. Here is this song.

The source of  this song

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 299).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 299).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Lay Me Down - music notation

The full lyrics

Lay Me Down

As I went one morning down by the Clarence Dock,
Who shipped I there
. There but Tapscott,
“Good morning, Mister Tapscott”, “Good morning, six”, says he,
“Have you got any ship bound for New York and the Coast of Amerikee?”

– Lay me down, lay me down,
– Lay me down dead,
– Lay me down, ay-jer-bup, Mrs. McQuale,
– Lay me down, ay-jer-bup, Mrs. Mahoolichan,
– Jeannie go ‘hooch’!
– Fire away, Bridget, I’m dying for thee

* 2 *

‘I have a packet, a packet or two,
The one, the Georgie Walker, and the other, the Kangaroo.
The one, the Georgie Walker, on Friday she’ll set sail,
And all the provisions she’d got on board is a thousand bags of meal.’

* 3 *

Now I’m landed in New York, and working in a canal,
For me to go back in a packet ship, a thing I never shall,
I’ll go back on one of the White Star Lines
. They carry both steam and sail,
And there I’ll get plenty of beef and soft tack, and none of your yellow meal.

Related to this victorian ditty

Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

Brindisi Di Marinai

Blow The Wind Southerly – Shore Song

The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns (Victorian Ditty)

Interesting Facts about The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns

This is the beautiful Victorian ditty “The Ghost of John James Benjamin Christopher Binns” by Harry Randall (1888), no doubt, the original predecessor of the “Rise Me Up From Down Below”, stamp-‘n’-go shanty. Fortunately, I found a musical score for this surely forgotten poem, which had a great time on broadsides of the 19th century.
I did not find any publication of this song mentioned, fortunately, Stan Hugill mention it, so this is probably my only opportunity to reconstruct this song and bring it back to life, and show this beautiful ballad to all who want to listen to sound of the past.

The source of this victorian ditty

The music: “The Ghost of John James Benjamin Christopher Binns” by Harry Randall (1888).
The lyrics: “The Ghost of John James Benjamin Christopher Binns” by Harry Randall (1888).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 281).

The Record of this victorian ditty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns - music notation 1
The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns - music notation 2

The full lyrics

The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns – Victorian Ditty

Hear my song, gentle folks, and dont be afraid,
I’m only a ghost, a poor harmless shade,
I would not hurt any one here if I could;
And you couldn’t do me much harm if you would;

Knives will not stab me nor shots thro’ me fly,
But oh! the experiment please do not try;
It’s not for my self that I care, not at all,
I’m only afraid you might damage the wall.

||   For:   ||

– I’m the ghost of John James Christopher Ben-jamin Binns,
– I was cut down right in the midst of my sins;
– For my home is down below, I’m let out for an hour or so;
– When the cock begins to crow, Fare well Benjamins Binns.

* 2 *

My wife she would say when I liv’d on this earth,
If I should die first, she’d never get wed;
To night I call’d on her, through key holes I crept,
If ghost could have tears, I am sure I’d have wept;

A man held my wife in his tender embrace,
She call’d him her hubby, hed taken my place;
To make matters worse, and to crown all my woes,
The fellow was wearing my best Sunday clothes.

||   The gass full on _ she could not see me _     ||
||   but I was determined she should hear me,      ||
||   So I said -"Hold mortal piece of flesh" _     ||
||   She shrieked and "held" the "mantel piece" _  ||
||   Then I in Sephulcral tones said,              ||
   - (chorus)

* 3 *

On the day that I died I left up on earth,
A fam’ly large and a boy of good birth,
Whom I taught to be honest and ever upright,
And hold on to money securely and tight;

But a short time thereafter imagine my woe,
When I heard that to canada off he did go;
“And just like his father” the people now say,
“Good riddins, bad rubbish, he’s out of the way!”

||   But I manage to get even with the rascally lad, ||
||   for each night when he lies in restless sleep,  ||
||   I crawl up from below and say:                  ||
   - (chorus)

Related to this victorian ditty

Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

Brindisi Di Marinai

Blow The Wind Southerly – Shore Song

Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

Interesting Facts about the Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

This is another beautiful Sicilian fisherman song comes from Alberto Favara “Canti della terra e del mare di Sicilia”(1921), “Cialoma Di Li Tunnari”. The tune of this beautiful song is reminiscent of the “Boys and Girls Come Out to Play” and its chorus “E amola, e amola”, certainly lends itself to a good drag on a rope.

The source of this fishermen song

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 247).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 247).

The Record of the Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Cialoma Di Li Tunnari - music notation

The full lyrics

Cialoma Di Li Tunnari

Emuninni cu’ Maria,
– E amola e amòla!

* 2 *

San Giuseppi ‘n cumpagnia.
– E amola e amòla!

* 3 *

E lu tunnu è veru beddu!
– E amola e amòla!

* 4 *

Carricamu’stu vasceddul
– E amola e amòla!

* 5 *

E di Genuva a Portufinu,
– E amola e amòla!

* 6 *

E Livurnu signurinu!
– E amola e amòla!

* 7 *

E assummamu ’sta safina!
– E amola e amòla!

* 8 *

E sparamu ’sta tunnina!
– E amola e amòla!

Assumma! assumma!

Related to this fisherman song

Brindisi Di Marinai

Blow The Wind Southerly – Shore Song

The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye (Alan Lomax) -River Song

Brindisi Di Marinai

Interesting Facts about the Brindisi Di Marinai

When we talk about the “Reuben Ranzo” halyard shanty, we can find in shanty collections books, many interesting theories about the main character of the song. Also, Stan Hugill also has the theory about who was a Reuben Ranzo. The origin of Ranzo and his shanty could be Sicilian? An emigrant, perhaps, to Yankee land who took with him a song he used to sing when hauling in the long tunny nets when he was a fisherman in the middle of the sea?
Stan Hugill says:
“Hence his fine fisherman’s song was rejuvenated as a deep-sea sailorman’s shanty. I wonder…
For here I present a fisherman’s song used at a similar job of work to that of hauling on halyards, a song for raising and hauling in the tunny nets of the fishermen of Sicily.”
The tune is identical to that of Reuben Ranzo and the pulls came in the same places.

The source of this fishermen song

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 245, 246).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 245, 246).

The Record of the Brindisi Di Marinai

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Brindisi Di Marinai - music notation 2
Brindisi Di Marinai - music notation 2

The full lyrics

Brindisi Di Marinai

‘Sciucamunni ’sta lampa!
– Lampabbo! Lampa!
Di ccà nun sinni jemu
– Lampabbo! Lampa!

* 2 *

Si ’sta lampa”ni l’asciucamul!
E nui rusolio vulemu;

* 3 *

La misculanza ci l’amua fari!
E nui ccà semu;

* 4 *

Di ccà nun si nni jèmu.
’Sciucamunni’sta lampa!

* 5 *

Saluti ci avi a dari
A cu’ ni fa travagghiari.

* 6 *

E ci l’avemu a’ mmugghiari;
Un biscutteddu n’avi a dari!

Related to this fisherman song

Blow The Wind Southerly – Shore Song

The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye (Alan Lomax) -River Song

Hieland Laddie (B) – stevedores chant

Blow The Wind Southerly – Shore Song

Interesting Facts about Blow The Wind Southerly

The melody and text of the Blow The Wind Southerly, which you will hear in my reconstruction, were taken from the earliest source I can achieve W. G. Whittaker’s “Blow The WInds Southetly” (1921 by J.Curwen & Sons Ltd.), but the origin, of course, is much older and some part of this song was first in print in the Sharp, Cuthbert, ed. (1834) “The bishoprick garland, or A collection of legends, songs, ballads, &c. belonging to the county of Durham”. This song generally is called “The Fishes”, it is the origin of the shanty under the same title. What we know about it this song is undoubtedly a Scottish fishermen’s song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Blow The WInds Southetly” by W. G. Whittaker (1921 by J.Curwen & Sons Ltd.).

The lyrics:  “Blow The WInds Southetly” by W. G. Whittaker (1921 by J.Curwen & Sons Ltd.).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 197).

The Record of the Blow The Wind Southerly

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Blow The Wind Southerly -music notation

The full lyrics

Blow The Wind Southerly

Blow-the wind southerly, southerly, southerly,
Blow
the wind south o’er the bonnie blue sea;
Blow-the wind southerly southerly southerly
Blow bonnie breeze, my lover to me

They told me last night there were ships in the offing.
And I hurried down to the deep rolling sea;
But my eye could not see it, wherever might be it
The barque that is bearing my lover to me.

* 2 *

Blo.w the wind southerly, southerly, southerly
Blow the wind south, that my lover may come;
Blo
.w the wind southerly southerly southerly,
Blow bonnie breeze, and bring him safe home.

I stood by the lighthouse the last time we parted,
Till darkness came down o’er the deep rolling sea!
And no longer I saw the bright bark of my lover–
Blow bonnie ‘breeze, and ‘bring him to me.

* 3 *

Blo.w the wind southerly, southerly, southerly
Blow the wind south, that my lover may come;
Blo
.w the wind southerly southerly southerly,
Blow bonnie ‘breeze, and ‘bring him to me.

Is it not ‘sweet to ‘hear the breeze singing,
As lightly it comes o’er the deep rolling sea?
But sweeter and dearer by far when ’tis bringing
The bark of my true love in safety to me.

Related to this song

The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye (Alan Lomax) -River Song

Hieland Laddie (B) – stevedores chant

The Powder Monkey – Shore Sea-Song

The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye (Alan Lomax) -River Song

Interesting Facts about The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye

This is one of the origins, of the “Shenandoah”, the most popular of all capstan and windlass shanties. Mentioned origin is the “The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye”, given by J. A. Lomax & Alan Lomax “American Ballads & Folk Songs” (1934), his version is ‘cavalry version’. It seems to be nothing more than a river song–one of the songs used by boatmen of the great American rivers (like Ohio). The story from Lomax’s book is this:
“The cavalry jealously claims this song for its very own, having acquired it, no doubt, during for frontier days. Sometimes the ‘would not have me for a lover’ stanza is followed by one beginning, ‘Because I was a wagon solider’; but the cavalry claims this to be a field artillery intrusion and an attempt to steal its song.”

The source of this river song

The music: “American Ballads & Folk Songs” by J. A. Lomax & Alan Lomax (1934).

The lyrics:  “American Ballads & Folk Songs” by J. A. Lomax & Alan Lomax (1934).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 173).

The Record of The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye

This song will be performed as an average song, not even in intention is to recreate this song by me as a shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye music notation

The full lyrics

The Wild Miz-Zou-Rye

For seven long years I courted Nancy,
– Hi! Ho! the rolling river!
For seven long years I courted Nancy,
– Ha! Ha! I’m bound away
– for the wild Miz-zou-rye!

* 2 *

She would not have me for a lover–
She would not have me for a lover–

* 3 *

And so she took my fifteen dollars–
And so she took my fifteen dollars–

* 4 *

And then she went to Kansas City–
And then she went to Kansas City–

* 5 *

And there she had a little sh-sh-baby–
And there she had a little sh-sh-baby–

* 6 *

She must have had another lover–
She must have had another lover–

* 7 *

He must have been a ——th Cavalry Solider–
He must have been a ——th Cavalry Solider–

* 8 *

I’m drinkin’ of rum and chawin’ tobacco–
I’m drinkin’ of rum and chawin’ tobacco–

* 9 *

I learned this song from Tommy Tompkins–
I learned this song from Tommy Tompkins–

Related to this song

Timber Drogher’s Shanty

The Powder Monkey – Shore Sea-Song

Roll The Wood-pile Down – Shore Song

Roll The Wood-pile Down – Shore Song

Interesting Facts about Roll The Wood-pile Down – Shore Song

Roll The Wood-pile Down is the Negro version, sailors sometimes sang the chorus from this version: “haul the woodpile down”. This song will be sung in halyard shanty tempo, but of course, it is a shore song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 160).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 161).

The Record Roll The Wood-pile Down – Shore Song

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Roll The Woodpile Down

Old Aunt Dinah had a farm
– Way down in Florida
Old Aunt Dinah had a farm
– Haul the woodpile down

Related to this song

Hieland Laddie (B) – stevedores chant

The Powder Monkey – Shore Sea-Song

Timber Drogher’s Shanty

roll-the-woodpile-down-2 load timber