The Liverpool Judies B

Interesting Facts about The Liverpool Judies B

“The Liverpool Judies B” was a very favorite capstan shanty among Liverpool ships. According to Stan Hugill, the song was of Irish origin and was sung in imitative Irish or Liverpool-Irish fashion. The song probably dates from the forties of the nineteenth century, since was popular in the Western Ocean Packets. This version has the same theme but a different tune. Stan Hugill took this version from the old Irish seamen Paddy Delaney.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 402).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 401,402).

The Record of The Liverpool Judies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Liverpool Judies B - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The Liverpool Judies B - music notation

And the full lyrics

The Liverpool Judies B

From Liverpool to ‘Frisco a rovin’ I went,
For to stay in that country wuz my good intent,
But drinkin’ strong whisky like other damn fools,
Oh I soon got transported back to Liverpool,
– Singin’ ro-o-o-oll, o-o-o-oll, roll, bullies, roll!
– Them Liverpool judies have got us in tow!

* 2 *

A smart Yankee packet lies out in the Bay,
A-waitin’ a fair wind to get under way,
With all of her sailors so sick and sore,
They’d drunk all their limejuice and can’t git no more.

* 3 *

Oh, here comes the in a hell of a stew,
He’s lookin’ for graft for us sailors to do,
Oh, it’s ‘Fore tops’l halyards!’ he loudly does roar,
An’ it’s lay along Paddy, ye son-o’ -a-whore!

* 4 *

One night off Cape Horn I shall never forget,
‘Tis oft-times I sighs when I think o’ it yet,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn with her main-skys’l’set,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn wid us all wringin’ wet.

* 5 *

An’ now we are haulin’ ‘way on to the Line,
When I thinks o’ it now, sure, we had a good time,
Them sea-boys box-haulin’ their yards all around,
For to beat that flash packet called the ‘Thatcher MacGawn’

* 6 *

An’ now we’ve arrived in the Bramleymoor Dock,
An’ all them flash judies on the pierhead do flock,
The barrel’s run dry an’ our five quid advance,
An’ I guess it’s high timefor to git up an’ dance.

* 7 *

Here’s a health to the Capen wherever he may be,
A friend to the sailor on land or on sea,
But as for the chief mate, the dirty ol’ brute,
We hope when he dies straight to hell he’ll skyhoot.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

The Liverpool Judies A

Interesting Facts about The Liverpool Judies A

“The Liverpool Judies A” was a very favorite capstan shanty among Liverpool ships. According to Stan Hugill, the song was of Irish origin and was sung in imitative Irish or Liverpool-Irish fashion. The song probably dates from the forties of the nineteenth century, since was popular in the Western Ocean Packets.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 401).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 401,402).

The Record of The Liverpool Judies A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Liverpool Judies A - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The Liverpool Judies A - music notation

And the full lyrics

The Liverpool Judies A

From Liverpool to ‘Frisco a rovin’ I went,
For to stay in that country wuz my good intent,
But drinkin’ strong whisky like other damn fools,
Oh I soon got transported back to Liverpool,
– Singin’ ro-o-o-oll, o-o-o-oll, roll, bullies, roll!
– Them Liverpool judies have got us in tow!

* 2 *

A smart Yankee packet lies out in the Bay,
A-waitin’ a fair wind to get under way,
With all of her sailors so sick and sore,
They’d drunk all their limejuice and can’t git no more.

* 3 *

Oh, here comes the in a hell of a stew,
He’s lookin’ for graft for us sailors to do,
Oh, it’s ‘Fore tops’l halyards!’ he loudly does roar,
An’ it’s lay along Paddy, ye son-o’ -a-whore!

* 4 *

One night off Cape Horn I shall never forget,
‘Tis oft-times I sighs when I think o’ it yet,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn with her main-skys’l’set,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn wid us all wringin’ wet.

* 5 *

An’ now we are haulin’ ‘way on to the Line,
When I thinks o’ it now, sure, we had a good time,
Them sea-boys box-haulin’ their yards all around,
For to beat that flash packet called the ‘Thatcher MacGawn’

* 6 *

An’ now we’ve arrived in the Bramleymoor Dock,
An’ all them flash judies on the pierhead do flock,
The barrel’s run dry an’ our five quid advance,
An’ I guess it’s high timefor to git up an’ dance.

* 7 *

Here’s a health to the Capen wherever he may be,
A friend to the sailor on land or on sea,
But as for the chief mate, the dirty ol’ brute,
We hope when he dies straight to hell he’ll skyhoot.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

La Margot

Interesting Facts about the La Margot

“La Margot” is the French capstan song. We can find this song in Hayet’s book “Chansons de bord” (1927). Stan Hugill tells us that Hayet under the name “Le Bihor”, in his other book “Chansons de la voile ‘Sans Voile'” gives uncamouflaged French matelot’s version, which has bawdy refrains and solos.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 398).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 398 – 400).

The Record of the La Margot

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

La Margot - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

La Margot - music notation

And the full lyrics

La Margot

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
Un’ jolie p’tit navire,
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
le captaine qui levi!
C’est mes mains qui sont,
De belle façon,
Les gabiers d’en-poin-tu-res
– Oh! hisse! et ho!
– Tire larigot,
– Hourra pour la Margot!

* 2 *

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
Un’ jolie p’tite énglise,
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
La recteur qui baptise!
C’est mes main qui sont,
De belle façon,
Les donners d’eau bénite.

* 3 *

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
Un’ jolie p’tite auberge,
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
La patron qui s’oberge!
C’est mes main qui sont,
De belle façon,
Las servants qui caressant.

* 4 *

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
La Reine de l’Empire!
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
Le Roi qu’elle soupire!
C’est mes main qui sont,
De belle façon,
Les pages qui lévent as jupe.

* 5 *

C’est Margot qu’aura biribi,
Mes louis, mes pistoles,
Mais si c’est moi qu’ai biribi,
Le malqui ne s’envole!
C’est mes mains qui s’ront,
De belle façon,
Un collier pour sa gorge!

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Miss Lucy Long

Interesting Facts about the Miss Lucy Long

“Miss Lucy Long”, a capstan song, is a shanty with West Indian connections. Broomielaw is a major thoroughfare in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. It runs adjacent to the River Clyde, on its north bank. Glasgow’s first quay was built at Brumelaw in 1688. Glasgow had strong connections with the Jamaica Sugar and Rum Trade. Stan Hugill picked up this song in Trinidad in 1931.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 396).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 395,396).

The Record of the Miss Lucy Long

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Miss Lucy Long - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Miss Lucy Long - music notation

And the full lyrics

Miss Lucy Long

Was ye niver down on the Broomilow, where the Yankee boys are all the go?
– Timme way-hay-hay-hay-hay-, hay-hay-ah-ha, me Johnny boys, ah-ha!
– Why don’t ye try for to ring Miss Lucy Long?

* 2 *

Oh, as I walking out one mornin’ fair, to view the view an’ take the air,

* 3 *

Oh, ’twas there I met Miss Lucy fair, ’twas there we met I do declare,

* 4 *

I raised me hat an’ said ‘how do?’ Sez she, ‘I will not walk with you.’

* 5 *

‘You dirty sailor, ye stinl o’ tar, besides I know what sailors are!’

* 6 *

‘My friend’s a Mate in the Blackball Line, in his uniform and his peak-cap fine.’

* 7 *

I left her there upon the quay, that gal she were too smart for me!

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Southern Ladies

Interesting Facts about the Southern Ladies

“Southern Ladies”, the capstan shanty presented by stan Hugill on the occasion of the shanties category with mentioning the name “Julia” inside the lyrics. The song was taken by Stan Hugill from “The Journal of the Folk Song Society (Vol 5. No.20 – November 1916). The described song was Noted by Cecil Sharp, sung by Mr. Harry Perry (Aged 61), on board the American liner, S.S. St. Paul, on July 21st, 1915. According to Cecil Sharp: “This is a negro labor-song of the cotton stations of the Southern States which, like many others of a similar character, has been commandeered by the sailor”. The lyrics and melody are identical to Journal, but on Journal we can find another two variants of the melody to 2nd verse.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 395).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 395).

The Record of the Southern Ladies

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Southern Ladies - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Southern Ladies - music notation

And the full lyrics

Southern Ladies

What will you fetch your Julia?
– Way-ay-ay-ay!
What will you fetch your Julia?
– She’s a southern lady – all the day.

* 2 *

One bottle of Florida water,
– Way-ay-ay-ay!
One bottle of Florida water,
– She’s a southern lady – all the day.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Spanish Ladies B

Interesting Facts about the Spanish Ladies B

“Spanish Ladies B” old naval song, only Stan Hugill and Captain Frank Shaw were writers who call this beautiful song the shanty. Hugill tells us it was the homeward-bound song sung at the capstan. This song has two tunes – the livelier and faster one being preferred by the later generation of sailing-ship men. Both versions including this one, Stan Hugill took from his father.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 386).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 386).

The Record of the Spanish Ladies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Spanish Ladies B - Capstan Shanties

The musical notation

And the full lyrics

Spanish Ladies B

Farewell an’ adieu to you fair Spanish ladies,
Farewell an’ adieu to you ladies of Spain,
For we’ve received orders for to sail for old England,
An’ hope very shortly to see you again.

– We’ll rant an’ we’ll roar, like true British sailors,
– We’ll rant an’ we’ll rave across the salt seas,
– Till we strike soundings in the Channel of Old England,
– 
From Ushant to Scilly is thirty-four leagues.

* 2 *

We hove our ship to, with the wind at sou’west, boys,
We hove our ship to for to take soundings clear.
In fifty-five fathoms with a fine sandy bottom,
We filled our maintops’l, up Channel did steer.

* 3 *

The first land we made was a point called the Deadman,
Next Ramshead off Plymouth, Start, Portland, and Wight.
We sailed then by Beachie, by Fairlee and Dover,
Then bore straight away for the South Foreland Light.

* 4 *

Now the signal was made for the Grand Fleet to anchor,
We clewed up our tops’ls, stuck out tacks and sheets.
We stood by our stoppers, we brailed in our spankers,
And anchored ahead of the noblest of fleets.

* 5 *

Let every man here drink up his full bumper,
Let every man here drink up his full bowl,
And let us be jolly and drown melancholy,
Drink a health to each jovial an’ true-hearted soul.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Spanish Ladies A

Interesting Facts about the Spanish Ladies A

“Spanish Ladies A” old naval song, only Stan Hugill and Captain Frank Shaw were writers who call this beautiful song the shanty. Hugill tells us it was the homeward-bound song sung at the capstan. This song has two tunes – the livelier and faster one being preferred by the later generation of sailing-ship men. Both versions including this one, Stan Hugill took from his father.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 385).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 385).

The Record of the Spanish Ladies A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Spanish Ladies A - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Spanish Ladies A - music notation

And the full lyrics

Spanish Ladies A

Farewell an’ adieu to you fair Spanish ladies,
Farewell an’ adieu to you ladies of Spain,
For we’ve received orders for to sail for old England,
An’ hope very shortly to see you again.

– We’ll rant an’ we’ll roar, like true British sailors,
– We’ll rant an’ we’ll rave across the salt seas,
– Till we strike soundings in the Channel of Old England,
From Ushant to Scilly is thirty-four leagues.

* 2 *

We hove our ship to, with the wind at sou’west, boys,
We hove our ship to for to take soundings clear.
In fifty-five fathoms with a fine sandy bottom,
We filled our maintops’l, up Channel did steer.

* 3 *

The first land we made was a point called the Deadman,
Next Ramshead off Plymouth, Start, Portland, and Wight.
We sailed then by Beachie, by Fairlee and Dover,
Then bore straight away for the South Foreland Light.

* 4 *

Now the signal was made for the Grand Fleet to anchor,
We clewed up our tops’ls, stuck out tacks and sheets.
We stood by our stoppers, we brailed in our spankers,
And anchored ahead of the noblest of fleets.

* 5 *

Let every man here drink up his full bumper,
Let every man here drink up his full bowl,
And let us be jolly and drown melancholy,
Drink a health to each jovial an’ true-hearted soul.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

Interesting Facts about the Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

“Whip Jamboree (Sharp)” is the capstan shanty. This version comes from ““English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 10). According to Sharp:
“there are no other versions of this chantey except one, in the major mode, given me by Mr. George Conway. The tune which is Eolian mode is a variant of Santy Anna (No I).In this construction, and to some extent in the character of its words, the chantey is asking to ‘Spanish Ladies’ (Folk Songs from Somerset, No. 124). The words of the chorus show negro influence. The Rock Light is in Cheshire, at the mouth of the Mersey. “Old Dan Lowerie’s,” Mr. Short said, was a popular playhouse in Paradise Street, Liverpool, near the Waterloo Dock, much frequent by sailors.”
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 10).
The lyrics: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 10).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 384).

The Record of the Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Whip Jamboree (Sharp) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Whip Jamboree (Sharp) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Whip Jamboree (Sharp)

Now, Cape Clear it is in … sight,
We’ll be off Holyhead by tomorrow night,
And we’ll shape our course for the Rock Light;
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

– Whip jamboree, Whip jamboree,
– Oh you longtailed black man, poke it up behind me.
– Whip jamboree, Whip jamboree,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 2 *

Now, my lads, we’re round the Rock,
All hammocks lashed and chests all locked,
We’ll haul her into the Waterloo Dock,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 3 *

Now, my lads, we’re all in dock
We’ll be off to Dan Lowrie’s on the spot;
And now we’ll have a good roundabout.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

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Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

Interesting Facts about the Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

“Whoop Jamboree (Terry)” is the capstan shanty. This version comes from “The Shanty Book Part II” (1926) by Richard Runciman Terry. Terry heard this song from the shantyman known as – Mr. Short of Watchet, Somerset. Terry in the description of the song gives us a hint about how to sing the word “whoop”, he says: “The word as ‘coughed up’ by Mr. Short (with a shock of the glottis) sounded more like ‘Whup'”.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.
The lyrics: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 383, 384).

The Record of the Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Whoop Jamboree (Terry) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Whoop Jamboree (Terry) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Whoop Jamboree (Terry)

Now, my lads, be of good cheer,
For the Irish land will soon draw near.
In a few days more we’ll sight Cape Clear.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

– Whoop jamboree, whoop jamboree,
– Oh you longtailed black man, poke it up behind.
– Whoop jamboree, whoop jamboree,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 2 *

Now Cape Clear it is in sight,
We’ll be off Holyhead by to-morrow night;
And we’ll shape our course for the Rock Light,
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 3 *

Now, my lads, we’re round the Rock,
All hammocks lashed and chests all locked.
We’ll haul her into the Waterloo dock.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

* 4 *

Now, my lads, we’re all in dock,
We’ll be off to Dan Lowries’s on the spot;
And now we’ll have a good roundabout.
– O Jenny, get your oat-cake done.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Jamboree (Whall)

Interesting Facts about the Jamboree (Whall)

“Jamboree (Whall)” is the capstan shanty. In the time when Stan Hugill wrote his book, swear words or “bawdy words” was not acceptable for print, so in any case “words” has to be camouflaged. As we know from his book, this song was very difficult to camouflage. According to the “last leaving shantymen” this song also breaks another theory that shanties contain unprintable words only in solos, here the final and noisiest line of the chorus is unprintable! This version Stan Hugill called: this “The London Version”, and gave the comment that is much the same as Whall’s, in fact, Whallalso in his book calls it the “London Version”. So probably to unify this case I will use Whall’s version and music, due to the Hugill giving us only text which is almost identical. The music is original from Whall.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by William Boultbee Whall (6th extended edition 1927).
The lyrics: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by William Boultbee Whall (6th extended edition 1927).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 383).

The Record of the Jamboree (Whall)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Jamboree (Whall) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Jamboree (Whall)

The pilot he looks out ahead,
O a hand in the chains, O a heaving of the lead!
The union Jack at our masthead,
– O I wonder if my clothes are out of pawn!

– Oh, Jamboree, Oh Jamboree,
– O its get away, you black man, don’t you come a-night me!
– Oh, Jamboree, Oh Jamboree,
– O I wonder if my clothes are out of pawn!

* 2 *

O it’s now we’re past o’ the Lizard lights,
The Start, boys, next will have in sight;
We’ll soon be abreast of the Isle of Wight;
O I wonder if my clothes are o’ pawn.

* 3 *

O when we get to the Blackwall docks,
The pretty young girls come down in flocks,
Some in their petticoats and some in frocks;
O I wonder if my clothes are o’ pawn.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C