Heave Away – Colcord

Interesting Facts about theHeave Away – Colcord

“Heave Away – Colcord” – one of the mentioned versions of the “Heave Away Me Johnnies” shanty, in Stan Hugill’s book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” on page 308. Joanna Colcord in her book says: “Heave Away,” or “We’re All Bound to Go,” shows little trace of its origin in the form in which its latest seagoing days were spent. I do reconstruct this song as the capstan song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Roll And Go – Songs Of American Sailormen” by Joanna C. Colcord (1st Edition) – (1924).
The lyrics: “Roll And Go – Songs Of American Sailormen” by Joanna C. Colcord (1st Edition) – (1924).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).

The Record of the Heave Away – Colcord

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away - Colcord - music notation

And the full lyrics

Heave Away – Colcord

Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool, more times we’re bound for France,
– Heave away, my Johnny, heave away away!
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool, more times we’re bound for France,
– And away, my Johnny boy, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

Oh, Johnny, you’re a rover, and to-day you sail away.
It’s I will be your own sweethart if you will only stay.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

Interesting Facts about the Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

“Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer” – one of the mentioned versions of the “Heave Away Me Johnnies” shanty, in Stan Hugill’s book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” on page 308. The Ferris and Tozer book song is in chapter “Anchor Songs” on pages 8 and 9. Following Davis and Tozer this song will be reconstructed as the anchor capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (1st Edition) – (1886).
The lyrics: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (1st Edition) – (1886).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).

The Record of the Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The full lyrics

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

As I was walking out one day,
Down by the Albert docks,
I saw the charming maids so gay,
A coming down in flocks,


– Heave away, my jolly boys,
– We’re all bound to go.

* 2 *

There was fair Poll and saucy Sue,
And merry laughing May,
And Sal and Ann, and Bessie true,
Dressed out in bunting gay.

* 3 *

They all were there to see a ship
Of note and noble fame,
That was about to make a trip,
The “Bengal” was her name.

* 4 *

The day was fine when she set sail,
The wind was blowing free;
But it had freshened to a gale,
Ere we were fair at sea.

* 5 *

We snugged her down and laid her to,
With reef’d main-topsail set;
“It was no joke,” I say to you,
Our bunks and clothes were wet.

* 6 *

The gale in fury had increased
Ere night was fairly come;
And ev’ry lubber never ceased
To wish himself at home.

* 7 *

It clear’d off fine at break of day,
The sails were set again;
The “Bengal” speed like life away
Across the raging main.

* 8 *

So gaily let your voices ring,
My Johnnies heave away.
We’re bound to go, so better sing
Than pipe your tears away.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Were All Bound To Go – Sampson

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

“Were All Bound To Go – Sampson”, according to Sampson is an outward bound capstan shanty, definitely of Liverpool origin, and the proof is Tapscott and Clarence Dock, Tapscott was a well-known Liverpool owner of sailing ships engaged in the American emigrant trade from 1842 to 1860.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Seven Seas Shanty Book” by John Sampson (1927 p 8, 9).
The lyrics: “The Seven Seas Shanty Book” by John Sampson (1927 p 8, 9).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 307).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Were All Bound To Go - Sampson - music notation

The full lyrics

Were All Bound To Go – Sampson

One day as I was walking down by the Clarence Dock,
– Heave away my bullies, heave away, ay
One day as I was walking down by the Clarence Dock,
– Heave away my bully boys, Were all bound to go.

* 2 *

I met a pretty Irish girl who gave a smile to me,
I met a pretty Irish girl who gave a smile to me,

* 3 *

“Good morning dear” I said to her “Good morning, Sir” said she,
“Good morning dear” I said to her “Good morning, Sir” said she,

* 4 *

“And are you Mr Tapscott whose ships are on the sea?”
“And are you Mr Tapscott whose ships are on the sea?”

* 5 *

“And have you got a packet ship for North Americee?”
“And have you got a packet ship for North Americee?”

* 6 *

Said I “My dear, you need not fear, if you come along with me,”
Said I “My dear, you need not fear, if you come along with me,”

* 7 *

“For I have got a Packet ship to carry you over the sea,”
“For I have got a Packet ship to carry you over the sea,”

* 8 *

“With more than fifty emigrants bound for Americee,”
“With more than fifty emigrants bound for Americee,”

Related to this sea shanty

Heave Away Me Johnnies B

Leave her Johnny Leave Her – Capstan

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Heave Away Me Johnnies B

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

“Heave Away Me Johnnies B” initially was a genuine brake-windlass shanty. Brake-windlass work was too heavy to move levers up and down, so movement from top to bottom has mid-step on the waist. The usual timing used was 2/4 or 6/8. This particular version was the most popular version according to Stan Hugill, singing in the latter days of sail as the capstan shanty. “The Last Shantyman” also says usually sang at 4/4 time, apparently not in this case because the music notation says 6/8 time, but in my reconstruction will try to accommodate this tempo to reconstruct it as capstan shanty anyways.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 306).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 306, 307).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Me Johnnies B - music notation

The full lyrics

Heave Away Me Johnnies B

Now Johnny was a rover, an’ today he sailed away,
– Heave away ay ay, me Johnnies, heave away-away!
Sez She I’ll be yer sweethart dear if ye will only stay,
– An away me bully boys, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool, sometimes we’re bound for france,
But now we’re bound to New York town to give the girls a chance,

* 3 *

Our advance note’s in our pocket, boys, it sure will take us fair,
An’ now a cruise down Lime Street, boys, an’ to the American Bar.

* 4 *

In two days’ time we’ll be outward bound an’ down the Mersey we’ll clip,
The gals’ll all be waiting, boys, when get back next trip.

* 5 *

The Peter’s flyin’ at the fore, the Pilot’s waiting the tide,
An’ soon we’ll be bound out again, bound for the other side.

* 6 *

An’ when we’re homeward bound again, our pockets lined once more,
We’ll spend it all with the gals, me boys, an’ go to sea for more.

* 7 *

So gaily let yer voices ring, me bullies heave ‘n’ bust,
‘Tain’t no use a caterwaulin’ — growl yer may, but go yer must.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Leave her Johnny Leave Her – Capstan

Interesting Facts about the Leave her Johnny Leave Her – Capstan

“Leave her Johnny Leave Her” was a shanty that was used at pumps or capstan, also sometimes used as halyard shanty. However, it was mostly not used during the voyage due to the risk of being accused of mutiny by the singers, which was quite a serious risk as it was the unwritten rule of the merchant fleet that no serious complaints aloud about the captain or the job were allowed. So, due to the lyrics of this song (many verses are unprintable), it was especially used at the end of the voyage, when the (especially wooden) ship was in port, and all that was left was the final clearing and pumping out the water from the bilge, then the sailors could complain freely and it was accepted by the captain. This reconstruction will be a capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 293).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 295, 296).

The Record of the Leave her Johnny Leave Her – Capstan

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Leave her Johnny Leave Her (Capstan) - music notation

The full lyrics

Leave her Johnny Leave Her (Capstan)

Oh, the times wuz hard, an’ the wages.. low,
– leave her, Johnny, leave her!
But now once more ashore we’ll go,
– An’ it’s time for us to leave her!

– Leave her, Johnny, leave her,
– Oooh! leave her, Johnny, leave her!
– For the voyage is done and the winds don’t blow
– An it’s time for us to leave her!

* 2 *

Oh, I thought I heard the Ol’ Man say,
Tomorrow ye will get your pay,

* 3 *

The work wuz hard an’ the voyage wuz long,
The sea wuz high an’ the gales wuz strong.

* 4 *

The wind wuz foul an’ the sea ran high,
She shipped it green an’ none went by.

* 5 *

The grub wuz bad an’ the wages low,
But now once more ashore we’ll go.

* 6 *

Oh, our Old Man he don’t set no sail,
We’d be better off in a nice clean goal.

* 7 *

We’d be better off in a nice clean goal.
With all night in an’ plenty o’ ale.

* 8 *

She’s poverty-stricken an’ parish-rigged,
The bloomin’ crowd is fever-stricked.

* 9 *

Oh, sing that we boys will never be
In a hungry bitch the likes o’ she.

* 10 *

The mate wuz a bucko an’ the Old man a Turk,
The bosun wuz a beggar with the middle name o’, work.

* 11 *

The Old Man swears an’ the mate swears to,
The crew all swear, an’ so would you.

* 12 *

It’s growl yer may an’ go yer must,
It matters not whether yer last or fust.

* 13 *

The winds wuz foul, all work, no pay,
To Liverpool Docks from ‘Frisco Bay.

* 14 *

The ship won’t steer, nor stay, nor wear,
An’ so us shellbacks learnt to swear.

* 15 *

She will not wear, nor steer, nor stay,
Her sails an’ gear all carried away.

* 16 *

We wuz made to pump all night an’ day,
An’ we half-dead had beggar-all to say.

* 17 *

We’ll leave her tight an’ we’ll leave her trim,
We’ll heave the hungry bastard in.

* 18 *

Oh, leave her, Johnny, an’ we’ll work no more,
Of pump or drown we’ve had full stroke

* 19 *

Leave her, Johnny, an’ we’ll leave her with a grin,
There’s many a worser we’ve sailed in.

* 20 *

The sails is furled an’ our work is done,
An’ now ashore we’ll have our bit o’ fun.

* 21 *

We’ll make her fast an’ stow our gear,
The gals are a-waitin’ on the pier.

* 22 *

Leave her, Johnny, ye can leave her like a man,
Oh, leave her, Johnny, oh, leave her while yer can.

* 23 *

Now I thought I heard the Old Man say,
One more good heave an’ then belay.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Interesting Facts about the Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Here is probably one of the development stages for the very famous shanty “Leave her, Johnny, Leave here”, the “Across The Western Ocean ( I )”. Stan Hugill mentions this song just before the description of the “Leave her, Johnny, Leave here”. This is the hauling shanty and will be reconstructed as a halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 292).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 292, 293).

The Record of the Across The Western Ocean ( I )

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Across The Western Ocean - music notation

The full lyrics

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Oh, though times are hard and the wages low,
– AMELia whar yer BOUND to?,
The Rocky Mountains is me home,
– Oh, ACROSS the Western OCEAN!!

* 2 *

A land of promise there ye’ll see,
I’m bound away across that sea.

* 3 *

To Liverpool that I’ll take my way,
To Liverpool that Packet School.

* 4 *

There’s Liverpool Pat wid his tarpaulin hat,
An’ Yannkee John, the Packet Rat.

* 5 *

Beware them Packet Ships I pray,
They’ll steal yer gear an’ clothes away.

* 6 *

We are bound away from our friends and home,
We’re bound away to seek for gold.

* 7 *

Mothers and sweetharts don’t ye cry,
Sister an’ brothers say goodbye.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Supen Ut En Dram På Man

O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

Hooker John (Harding)

Interesting Facts about the Hooker John (Harding)

“Hoker John” is the capstan shanty, which comes from Harding Barbadian, probably the most recognizable source of the shanties that Stan Hugill when sailed with on merchant ships service. Harding Barbadian tells to Stan Hugill, that this song was still popular in the West Indies (1931). It probably originated as a cotton Stower’s song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 291).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 291).

The Record of the Hooker John (Harding)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hooker John (Harding) - music notation

The full lyrics

Hooker John (Harding)

Oh! me Mary she’s a sailor’s lass,
– To me Hooker John, me Hoojohn!
Oh, we courted all day on the grass,
– to me Hooker John, me Hoojohn!

– ‘Way Susanna–oh, way, hay, high, high ya!
– Johnny’s on the foreyard,
– Yonder, way up yonder.

* 2 *

Oh, my Susie she’s a nigger’s gal,
She’s nine foot high–that gal’s so taall.

* 3 *

Oh, my Flora she’s a hoosier’s frien’,
She’s beamy round the ol’ beam-end.

* 4 *

Oh, Sally Brown she’s the gal for me,
She courts a bit when her man’s at sea.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Supen Ut En Dram På Man

O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

Ooker John

Interesting Facts about the Ooker John

“Ooker John” is the shanty mentioned by Stan Hugill in his biggest book, when he describes the shanty with the title “Hooker John”. A couple of issues that this shanty has are that fact is, that was never directly told for what work was used this shanty for, however, was mentioned is similar to other capstan shanties, so by this and by the construction of verse and chorus with good probability we can say it is capstan shanty.
Another issue is that Captain Whall in his book “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” (4th enlarged edition 1913 page 101), which Stan Hugill refers to, doesn’t even give to us the title of this song, so actually, the title comes from Stan Hugill. Harding Barbadian tells to Stan Hugill, it was still popular in the West Indies (1931). It probably originated as a cotton Stower’s song.

The source of this sea shanty

The lyrics: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by W. B. Whall (4th enlarged edition 1913 page 101).
The lyrics: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by W. B. Whall (4th enlarged edition 1913 page 101).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 290).

The Record of the Ooker John

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Ooker John - music notation

The full lyrics

Ooker John

O my Mary she’s a blooming lass,
– To my Ooker John, my Oo-John,
O my Mary she’s a blooming lass,
– To my Ooker John, my Oo-John,

– Way, fair lady, O way-ay-ay-ay-ay,
– My Mary’s on the highland,
– O yonder’s Mary–yonder….

Related to this sea shanty

O Johnny Come To Hilo – Cecil Sharp

The Hawks-Eye Man (Bolton)

O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

Supen Ut En Dram På Man

Interesting Facts about the Supen Ut En Dram På Man

The “Supen Ut, En Dram Pa Man”, a fantastic Swedish Capstan shanty from “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935) (1st ed p 322, 323). is the shanty which also we can include in the Hugill family of shanties with the words “Whisky Johnny” in the theme. It comes from recollections of sailmaker Oskar Johansosson of Masthugget in Gothenburg. According to the footnotes from the original book it was very popular among all the Scandinavian vessels lying in Delagoa Bay, Portuguese East Africa, in the year 1904.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 282).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 282, 283).

The Record of the Supen Ut En Dram På Man

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Supen Ut, En Dtam På Man - music notation

The full lyrics

Supen Ut, En Dram På Man

Å, supen ut, en dram på man!
Väl klarar skutan sig från land.
om blott I hugger i med kläm.
– En dram för oss Johnnies!

– Kom hör, kom hör, kom hör oss nu!
– Ur djupa strupar kallas du.
– En tår som går från lår till lår,
– en dram för oss Johnnies!

* 2 *

Du stewart, fram med flaska grann!
Fyll i en peg till varje man!
De ä långt till Rio som ni vet.

* 3 *

Slå pall i spelet, vinda hem!
Nu går det med en väldans kläm,
slik olja nyttar som I ser.

* 4 *

Den stewart kommer snart igen,
så fort vårt ankar vindats hem.
Ligg an på spaken, alle man!

* 5 *

Fast heaven, gubbar, klart vid fall!
Nu alla segel sättas skall,
stolt skutan faller av för vind.

Related to this sea shanty

O Johnny Come To Hilo – Cecil Sharp

The Hawks-Eye Man (Bolton)

O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

“O Whos Been Here” is a shanty mentioned by Stan Hugill when He described the “Hog-eye Man” shanty. This song (unfortunately not even a bit of the verse more), we can find in the “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January 1914 page 42). Song was noted by Cecil J. Sharp, sung by Mr. John Allen (aged 67), 183, Adelaide Road, Feb, 18th, 1909. Cecil Sharp tells us that this song is evidently a version of the “Hog-eyed” or “Hawk’s-eyed Man”. The words of this shanty (a favorite when the ship was being hauled into the dock), refers to life ashore, and this verse may belong to other printed fragments. A reference to the Yankee sailor’s sea boots (as contrasted with the pumps or bare feet of English sailors) occurs also in a version of “John’s gone to Hilo”.

The source of the O Whos Been Here

The music: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January, 1914 page 42).
The lyrics: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January, 1914 page 42).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 272).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

O Whos Been Here - music notation

The full lyrics

O Whos Been Here

O who’s been here since I’ve been gone,
A Yankee boy with his sea boots on,

– Ha Ha!
– Ha Ha!

Related to this sea shanty

Johnny Come Down To Hilo

Ten Stone

The Hog-eye Man