Sister Susan

Interesting Facts about the Sister Susan

“Sister Susan” also known as the “Shibone Al”, is used as the hauling shanty. According to Stan Hugill is a typical West Indian or Southern States’ work-song taken to sea and turned into a shanty. The song Stan Hugill learned from shantyman, “Harry Lauder” of St. Lucia, B.W.I.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 391).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 391).

The Record of the Sister Susan

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Sister Susan - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Sister Susan - music notation

And the full lyrics

Sister Susan

Sister Susan an’ my gal Sal,
– GWINE ter git a-home by’n’BY!
All a gwine ter live down Shibone Al,
– GWINE ter git a-home by’n’BY!
We’re all gonne live down Shibone Al ley,
– GWINE ter git a-home by’n’BY!

* 2 *

Portugee Joe came down aour Al,
Portugee Joe he got my Sal,
He went an’ ran off with my Sally,

* 3 *

So I thought I’d take a trip to sea,
So I shipped aboard o’ a big Yankee,
I went an’ shipped out of Nantucket.

* 4 *

A whaler’s life is no life for me,
I jumped her an’ I left the sea,
I ran right back to Shinbone Alley.

Related to this sea shanty

As-Tu-Connu Le Per’ Lanc’lot

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De Runer Von Hamborg

Round The Corner Sally (Terry)

Interesting Facts about the Round The Corner Sally (Terry)

“Round The Corner Sally (Terry)” – the halyard song mentioned by Dana in his “Two Years Before Mast”.
This version mentioned by Stan Hugill comes from “The Shanty Book Part II” (1926) by Richard Runciman Terry. This song was Sung to Terry by one of the most famous shantymen, Mr. John Short of Watchet. In the description, we can read:
” … The first verse, as I took it down from him, had three lines for the soloist. As I knew only one other hauling shanty with this peculiarity (“Cheer’ly men”) I bided my time until Mr. Short had sung other verses. I then found that these verses were in “couplets” (the usual hauling form). I have, therefore, adhered to the couplet from throughout.”
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.
The lyrics: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 390).

The Record of the Round The Corner Sally (Terry)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Round The Corner Sally (Terry) - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Round The Corner Sally (Terry) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Round The Corner Sally

O around the corner we will go.
– ROUND th’ corner SAL-ly!
O around the corner we will go.
– ROUND th’ corner SAL-ly!

* 2 *

To Madam Gashee’s we all will go,
For Madamoiselle you all do know.

* 3 *

O Madamoiselle we’ll take her in tow,
We’ll take her in tow to Callao

* 4 *

O I wish I was at Madam Gashee’s,
It’s there we’ll sit and take our ease.

Related to this sea shanty

As-Tu-Connu Le Per’ Lanc’lot

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Round The Corner Sally (Harding)

Interesting Facts about the Round The Corner Sally (Harding)

“Round The Corner Sally” – the halyard song mentioned by Dana in his “Two Years Before Mast”. Stan Hugill tells us that:
“The term “round-the-corner-sally” is often found in “Negro” minstrelsy and means anything from a female species of “corner boy” to a fully-fledged prostitute.”
The “corner” indicated in this shanty seems to be Cape Horn. The version given to us here comes from Harding Barbadian.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 389).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 389, 390).

The Record of the Round The Corner Sally (Harding)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Round The Corner Sally (Harding) - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Round The Corner Sally (Harding) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Round The Corner Sally

Round the corner an’ away we go!
– ROUND th’ corner SAL-ly!
Round the corner where them gals do go,
– ROUND th’ corner SAL-ly!

* 2 *

Oh, Sally Brown she’s the gal for me,
She’s waitin’ there by the mango tree,

* 3 *

She loves me good, she loves me long,
She loves me hot, she loves me strong.

* 4 *

Was ye ever down in Mobile Bay?
Where the gals all spend a white man’s pay?

* 5 *

I wisht I had that gal in tow,
I’d take her in tow to Callyo.

* 6 *

To Callyo we’re bound to go,
Around that corner where there’s ice an’ snow.

* 7 *

So round ‘er up an’ stretch ‘er luff,
I think by Gawd we’ve hauled enough!

Related to this sea shanty

Coal Black Rose

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

Sing Sally O! (version B)

Interesting Facts about the Sing Sally O! (version B)

“Sing Sally O! (version B)” is a song which has two versions, capstan and halyard. Both versions Stan Hugill have from Harding Barbadian, who declared they were both used ‘ashore’ in the West Indies for any job where a work-song was needed.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 389).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 389).

The Record of the Sing Sally O! (version B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Sing Sally O! (version B) - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Sing Sally O! (version B) - music notation

And the full lyrics

Sing Sally O! (version B)

Oh, good mornin’ Mudder Dinah, What is the matter?
– SING, Sally-O! FOL-lol-de-day!
Oh, hurrah! hurrah! my Mudder Dinah,
– SING, Sally-O! FOL-lol-de-day!

* 2 *

The news is goin’ round, the packet’s homeward bound,
O kiss yer gals an’ drinks all round, boys,

* 3 *

We’ll drink hot rum an’ let’s all have some fun,
We’ll soon be headin’ for the homeward run.

* 4 *

Goodbye to Mudder Dinah, there ain’t no gal finer,
Goodbye, goodbye to all the gals.

Related to this sea shanty

Coal Black Rose

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

Do Let Me Lone Susan

Interesting Facts about the Do Let Me Lone Susan

“Do Let Me Lone Susan” Halyard shanty comes from Harding Barbadian, a shipmate of Stan Hugill used in both American and British ships. Stan Hugill claims that “Shanties From the Seven Seas”, is the first place where this song is in print. The song is of Spanish-American origin with similar timing to calypso.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 379).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 379, 380).

The Record of the Do Let Me Lone Susan

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Do Let Me Lone Susan - music notation

And the full lyrics

Do Let Me Lone Susan

Do let me lone, Susan, Och! do let me lone!
– HooRAW! me loo-loo boys, Do let me lone!
When I put me arm round Jinny’s waist,
oh, Jinny jump about,
– HooRAW! me loo-loo boys, Do let me lone!
When I put me hand on Jinny’s head,
oh, Jinny jumps away,
– HooRAW! me loo-loo boys!

* 2 *

Do let me lone, Flora, oh, do let me lone.
– HooRAW …
When I put me hand on Jinny’s cheek,
oh, Jinny jumps about,
– HooRAW …
When I try to play with Jinny’s ear,
oh, Jinny jumps away,
– HooRAW …

* 3 *

Do let me lone, Rosy, oh, do let me lone.
– HooRAW …
When I put me hand on Jinny’s waist,
oh, Jinny jump about,
– HooRAW …
When I Stroke my Jinny on the back,
oh, Jinny jumps away,
– HooRAW …

* 4 *

Do let me lone, Judy, oh, do let me lone.
– HooRAW …
When I put me hand on Jinny’s lap,
oh, Jinny jump about,
– HooRAW …
When I kiss my Jinny on the lips,
oh, Jinny jump away,
– HooRAW …

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Coal Black Rose

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

Interesting Facts about the Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

“Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)” halyard shanty which Stan Hugill called real “Cape Horner”, very popular in Liverpool ships, and yet overlooked by most collectors. The “Blood red roses” are related to Napoleon and the British soldiers – “Redcoats” or “Blood-red Roses” as they were called on account of the red jackets they invariably wore. This version comes from Hugill’s shipmate Harding Barbadian.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 365).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 365, 366).

The Record of the Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2) - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2) - music notation

The full lyrics

Bunch O Roses (tune version 2)

Me Bonnie bunch o’ roses, o!
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!
Time for us to roll ‘n’ go!
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!

– Oooh, ye pinks an’ poses,
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!
– Oooh, ye pinks an’ poses,
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!

* 2 *

We’re bound out to Iquique Bay,
We’re bound away at the break o’ day,

* 3 *

We’re bound away around Cape Horn,
We wisht ter hell we’d niver bin born.

* 4 *

Around Cape Stiff we all must go,
Around Cape Sriff through the ice an’ snow.

* 5 *

Me boots an’ clothes are all in pawn,
An’ it’s bleedin’ draughty around Cape Horn.

* 6 *

‘Tis growl ye may but go ye must,
If ye growl too hard yer head they’ll bust.

* 7 *

The gals are waitin’ right ahead,
A long strong pull should shift the dead.

* 8 *

Them Spanish gals are pullin’ strong,
Hang down, me boys, it won’t take long.

* 9 *

Oh, rock an’ shake ‘er is the cry,
The bleedin’ topm’st sheave is dry.

* 10 *

Just one more pull an’ that’ll do,
We’re the bullies for ter kick ‘er through.

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Blow The Man Down (B2 – second method)

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Walk him along Johnny

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

Interesting Facts about the Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

“Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)” halyard shanty which Stan Hugill called real “Cape Horner”, very popular in Liverpool ships, and yet overlooked by most collectors. The “Blood red roses” are related to Napoleon and the British soldiers – “Redcoats” or “Blood-red Roses” as they were called on account of the red jackets they invariably wore. This version comes from Hugill’s shipmate Harding Barbadian.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 365).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 365, 366).

The Record of the Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1) - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1) - music notation

The full lyrics

Bunch O Roses (tune version 1)

Me Bonnie bunch o’ roses, o!
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!
Time for us to roll ‘n’ go!
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!

– Oooh, ye pinks an’ poses,
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!
– Oooh, ye pinks an’ poses,
– COME down ye bunch o’ roses, COME down!

* 2 *

We’re bound out to Iquique Bay,
We’re bound away at the break o’ day,

* 3 *

We’re bound away around Cape Horn,
We wisht ter hell we’d niver bin born.

* 4 *

Around Cape Stiff we all must go,
Around Cape Sriff through the ice an’ snow.

* 5 *

Me boots an’ clothes are all in pawn,
An’ it’s bleedin’ draughty around Cape Horn.

* 6 *

‘Tis growl ye may but go ye must,
If ye growl too hard yer head they’ll bust.

* 7 *

The gals are waitin’ right ahead,
A long strong pull should shift the dead.

* 8 *

Them Spanish gals are pullin’ strong,
Hang down, me boys, it won’t take long.

* 9 *

Oh, rock an’ shake ‘er is the cry,
The bleedin’ topm’st sheave is dry.

* 10 *

Just one more pull an’ that’ll do,
We’re the bullies for ter kick ‘er through.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow The Man Down (B2 – second method)

Blow The Man Down (E)

Walk him along Johnny

Coal Black Rose

Interesting Facts about the Coal Black Rose

“Coal Black Rose” is another halyard shanty, also given by Frank T. Bullen. According to Stan Hugill, it definitely has Negro origin. Hugill tells us that his informant Harding Barbadian said that the final line was the only chorus and the only place where the pull came.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 364).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 364).

The Record of the Coal Black Rose

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Coal Black Rose - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Coal Black Rose - music notation

The full lyrics

Coal Black Rose

Oh, me Rosie, Coal Black Roose,
Don’t ye hear the banjo,
ping-a-pong a-pong!
– Oh, me Rosie, COAL Black Roose!

* 2 *

Oh, me Rosie, Coal Black Roose,
Strung up like a banjo,
Allus taut an’ long,
– Oh, me Rosie, COAL Black Roose!

* 3 *

Oh, me Rosie, Coal Black Roose,
The yard is now a-movin’,
Hauley-hauley ho!
– Oh, me Rosie, COAL Black Roose!

* 4 *

The Mate he comes around, boys,
Dining an’ a dang.
Hauley-hauley ho!
– Oh, me Rosie, COAL Black Roose!

* 5 *

Give her one more pull, boys,
Rock an’ roll ‘er high.
Hauley-hauley ho!
– Oh, me Rosie, COAL Black Roose!

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Walkalong My Rosie

Interesting Facts about the Walkalong My Rosie

“Walkalong My Rosie” is another halyard shanty singing about the “Rosy”. Frank T. Bullen also gave us this shanty and classify it as a capstan shanty. But Stan Hugill’s friend Harding Barbadian declared that he had never heard it at any other job than the halyards. It is pure Negro orygin shanty.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 363).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 363).

The Record of the Walkalong My Rosie

“Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 203, 204).

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Walkalong My Rosie - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Walkalong My Rosie - music notation

The full lyrics

Walkalong My Rosie

Oh, I am here, an’ Rosie there.
– AWAY you Rosie – WALK along!
Oh, I am here, an’ Rosie there.
– WALKalong my ROSIE!

* 2 *

Oh, Rosie! she’m the gal fer me,
She hangs around the big levee,

* 3 *

My Rosie’s a young, my Rosie’s kind,
A better gal you’ll niver find.

* 4 *

So haul me up and hang me off,
The mate he says we’ve hauled enough.

Related to this sea shanty

Haul Er Away! A

Haul Er Away! B

So Heave Away

Haul Away Old Fellow Away

Interesting Facts about the Haul Away Old Fellow Away

According to Stan Hugill, “Haul Away Old Fellow Away” is the French halyard shanty related to “Haul Away Joe”. Stan Hugill took this song from Captain Hayet’s “Chansons de board” (1927).
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 362).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 362).

The Record of the Haul Away Old Fellow Away

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Haul Away Old Fellow Away - Halyard Shanty

The musical notation

Haul Away Old Fellow Away - music notation

The full lyrics

Haul Away Old Fellow Away

C’est en passant sur l’pont d’Morlaix
– Haul away ! Old fellow away !
La belle Hélène j’ai rencontrée
– Haul away ! Old fellow away !

* 2 *

Bien humblement j’l’ai saluée,
D’un doux sourire ell’ m’a remercié.

* 3 *

Mais j’ai bien vu qu’c’est charité,
Car c’est une dame de qualité

* 4 *

C’est la fille d’un cap’taine nantais,
Un matelot ne s’ra jamais.

* 5 *

Pour nous sont les garces des quais,
Qui vol’nt, qui mentent, qui font tuer!

* 6 *

Je n’étale plus, j’vais tout larguer,
J’vas faire mon trou dans la salée.

* 7 *

Mat’lots, mon coeur est embrumé,
Buvons quand même à sa beauté.

* 8 *

Encore un coup pour étarquer,
Hisse le grand foc, tout est payé!

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Heave Away Boys Heave Away A

Leave Her Johnny – Halyard

John Kanaka