The Banks O Newfnland – Doerflinger

Interesting Facts about The Banks O Newfnland – Doerflinger

“The Banks O Newfnland – Doerflinger” – described by Doerflinger in his “Shantymen And Shantyboys” as the Deep-Water Song. According to Stan Hugill, this version is from the singing of Richard Maitland of Sailors’ Snug Harbor, and Doerflinger has given his slightly different way of singing verses 2 and 3 and their choruses. Hugill gives us only the first verse, I will reconstruct this song in full six verses as given to us in Doerflinger’s book.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the Forebitter.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
The lyrics: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 413).

The Record of The Banks O Newfnland – Doerflinger

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Banks O Newfnland (Doerflinger) - Forebitter

The musical notation

The Banks O Newfnland - Doerflinger - music notation 1
The Banks O Newfnland - Doerflinger - music notation 2
The Banks O Newfnland - Doerflinger - music notation 3

The full lyrics

The Banks O Newfnland – Doerflinger

You rambling boys of Liverpool, I’d have you to beware,
When you ship on a Yankee packet ship, no dungarees do wear,
But have a monkey pea jacket all ready at your command,
To protect you from the cold nor’-westers on the banks of Newfoundland.

– We’ll rub her down and scrub her down, with holystones and sand,
– And we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks and the banks of Newfoundland!

* 2 *

We had one Jimmy Lynch from Ballyna-hinch, Mike Murphy and Jim Moore.
‘Twas in the winter of ‘seventy-two those boys they suffered sore.
They pawned their clothes in Liverpool, then they sold them our of hand,
Never thinking of cold nor”-westers on the banks of Newfoundland.

* 3 *

We had a lady passenger, Bridget Murphy was her name.
From her I’d promised marriage; on me she had a claim.
She tore up her flannel peticoats and made stockin’s for my hands,
For she said she couldn’t see her true love freeze on the banks of Newfoundland.

* 4 *

I had a dream the other night, I dreamt that I was home.
I dreamt that me and my true love where in old Marylebone.
That we were on old England’s shore with a jug of ale in hand,
But when I woke, my heart was broke on the banks of Newfoundland.

* 5 *

It’s now we’re passing the Virgin Rocks and stormy winds do blow,
With a crowd of sailors on the deck a-shoveling off the snow.
We’ll wash her down, we’ll scrub her deck with holystone and sand,
And we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks on the Banks of Newfounland!

* 5 *

It’s now we’re passing Sandy Hook, and the cold winds they still blow.
With a tug-boat right ahead of us, into New York we’ll go.
We’ll fill our glasses brimming full, with a jug of rum in hand,
For while we’re here, we can’t be there on the Banks of Newfounland!

Related to this Forebitter

Paddy West

Jack All Alone

Paddy Lay Back – Forebitter

The Banks O Newfnland – Forebitter

Interesting Facts about The Banks O Newfnland – Forebitter

“The Banks O Newfnland” as described by Stan Hugill, is usually capstan shanty, but this version was sung as forebitter. The song was given to Stan Hugill by Mr. D. McDonald of Glasgow.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the forebitter.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 412).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 412, 413).

The Record of The Banks O Newfnland – Forebitter

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Banks O Newfnland - Forebitter

The musical notation

The Banks O Newfnland - Forebitter - music notation

The full lyrics

The Banks O Newfnland – Forebitter

Oh, come, all you roving sailors, and sporting blades, beware,
When you jump on board a packet ship, no dungaree jumpers wear,
But always have good monkey-jackets at your command
Think of the cold nor’westers on the Banks of Newf’n’land.

* 2 *

Now there was one Lynch from Ballynahinch, Jim Kane and Mick O’Moore,
It was in the year of sixty, the mariners suffered sore,
With all their clothes in Liverpool, they’d spent money with either hand,
Not thinking of the cold nor’westers on the Banks of Newf’n’land.

* 3 *

Oh, there was a girl on board that ship, Kate Conner was her name,
I promised I would marry her, for on me she had a claim.
She tore up her flannel petticoat, to make mittens for my hands,
For I won’t see my true love freezing on the Banks of Newf’n’land.

* 4 *

Oh, now we’re off the Hook, me boys, the land all covered with snow,
The towboat is achead and to New York soon we’ll go.
We’ll scrub her deck, we’ll scrub her down with holystones and sand,
So we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks on the Banks of Newf’n’land.

* 5 *

Oh, I had a dream, a happy dream, I dreamt that I was home,
Alongside of my own true love and she in Marybone,
A jug of ale all on my knee, a glass of ale in my hand,
But when I woke my heart was broke, on the Banks of Newf’n’land.

Related to this Forebitter

Paddy West

Jack All Alone

Paddy Lay Back – Forebitter

The Banks O Newfnland

Interesting Facts about The Banks O Newfnland

“The Banks O Newfnland” as described by Stan Hugill, capstan shanty comes from his friend “Scottie” of Port Adelaide. He tells to Hugill that he heard this song when young sung at the capstan with all the twiddles and quavers seamen of the old school would adorn this type of song with.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the Capstan Shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 412).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 412).

The Record of The Banks O Newfnland

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Banks O Newfnland - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The Banks O Newfnland - music notation

The full lyrics

The Banks O Newfnland

Ye ramblin’ boys o’ Liverpool, Ye sailorman beware,
when jiz go in a Yankee pocket ship, no dungaree jumpers wear,
Buut have a monkey jacket all up to your command,
For there blown some cold nor’-westers on the Banks of Newf’nland,

– We’ll wash her an’ we’ll scrub ‘er down, wid holystone an’ sand,
– An’ we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks an’ the Banks o’ Newf’n’land.

* 2 *

We had one Lynch from Ballynahinch, Spud Murphy an’ Paddy Malone.
‘Twas in the winter of seventy-three those sea-boys suffered sore,
They popped their clothes in Liverpool, sold them all out of hand,
Not thinkin’ of the cold nor’winds on the Banks o’ Newf’n’land.

* 3 *

We had a lady fair aboard, Bridget Reilly wuz ‘er name,
To her I promised marriage an’ on me she had a claim.
She tore up her red flannel petticoats, me bhoys, to make mittens for our hands,
For she could not see them sea-boys freeze, on the Banks o’ Newf’n’land.

* 4 *

I dreamt a dream the other night, an’ t’ought I wuz at home,
I dreamt that me an’ my Judee, wuz back in Dublin Town,
We both wuz in the ale-house wi’ a jug o’ beer in hand,
But when I woke I found no jokes on the Banks o’ Newf’n’land.

Related to this sea shanty

Cant You Dance The Polka (C F Smith version)

The New York Gals

Doodle Let Me Go

Van Diemans Land

Interesting Facts about the Van Diemans Land

“Van Diemans Land” is a song often sung in Liverpool and as a forebitter, and very popular on Liverpool ships. The song was originally a shore ballad, and under the title “The banks of Newf’n’land” a parody of an older forebitter, and was sung as the capstan song. It tells of the suffering of poachers transported to Van Diemen’s Land.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the forebitter.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 411).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 411).

The Record of the Van Diemans Land

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Van Diemans Land - Forebitter

The musical notation

Van Diemans Land - music notation

The full lyrics

Van Diemans Land – Forebitter

Ye ramblin’ boys of Liverpool, I’ll have ye to be ware,
‘Tis when ye go a huntin’ wid yer dog, yer gun, yer snore,
Watch out boys for the game keepers, keep yer dog at your command,
Just think on all them hard–ships, goin’ to Van Dieman’s Land.

* 2 *

We had two Irish lads on board, Mickey Murphy an’ Paddy Malone,
And they were both the stoutest friends that ever a man could own,
But the gamekeeper he’d caught them, and from ol’ England’s strand,
They were seven years transported for plough Van Dieman’s Land.

* 3 *

We had on board a lady fair, Bridget Reilly wuz her name,
An’ she wuz sent from Liverpool for a-playin’ of the game.
Out captain fell in love wid her and he married her out of hand,
And she gave us all good usage, boys, goin’ to Van Dieman’s Land.

* 4 *

The moment that we landed there, upon that fatal shore,
The planters they inspected us, some fifty score or more,
They marched us off like hosses, an’ they sold us out of hand,
Then yoked us to the plough, me boys, for to plough Van Dieman’s Land.

* 5 *

As I lay in me bunk one night, a-dreamin’ all alone,
I dreamt I wuz in Liverpool, ‘way back in Marybone,
Wid me own true love beside me, an’ a jug o’ ale in me hand,
Then awoke so broken-hearted, lyin’ on Van Dieman’s Land.

Related to this Forebitter

Paddy West

Jack All Alone

Paddy Lay Back – Forebitter

Ten Thousand Miles Away

Interesting Facts about the Ten Thousand Miles Away

“Ten Thousand Miles Away” is originally a shore ballad and later a forebitter. Stan Hugill also tells us it was used at times as a capstan shanty. Song was sung first by street singers in Ireland in the early years of the XIX century. Under the name “Botany Bay” was a favorite song of the old London music halls of the 50s and 60s of the XX century. This version is given it comes from the mother’s father (J. Southwood) of Stan Hugill and it was a usual version that was sung as the capstan shanty or forebitter.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the Forebitter.

The source of this Forebitter

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 409).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 409,410).

The Record of the Ten Thousand Miles Away

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Ten Thousand Miles Away - Forebitter

The musical notation

Ten Thousand Miles Away - music notation

The full lyrics

Ten Thousand Miles Away

Sing ho! for a brave an’ a gallant ship,
an’ a fair an’ fair’-rin’ breeze,
Wi’ a bully crew an’ a cap’-n too,
to carry me over the seas.
To carry me over the seas me boys,
To me true love for away,
For I’m taking a trip in a Government ship,
Ten thousands miles away!

– Then–blow, ye winds, an’ blow!
– An’ a-rovin’ I will go,
– I’ll stay no more on England’s shore,
– To hear sweet music play, ay, ay, ay,
– For I’m on the move to me own true love,
– Ten thousand miles away!

* 2 *

My true love wuz beautiful,
An’ my true love wuz gay,
But she’s taken a trip on a Government ship,
Bound out to Botany Bay,
Bound out to Botany Bay, m’boys,
An’ though she’s far away,
I’ll never forget me own true love,
Ten thousand miles away!

* 3 *

Oh, it wuz a summer’s mornin’,
When last I seed my Meg,
She’d a Government band around each hand,
An’ another one round her leg,
An’ another one round her leg, m’ boys,
As the big ship left the Bay,
Adieu she sez remember me,
Ten thousand miles away!

* 4 *

I wisht I wuz a bosun bold,
Or a sailor widout fear
I-d man a boat an’ away I’d float,
An’ straight for me true love steer.
An’ straight for me true love steer, m’ boys,
Where the whales an’ dolphins play,
Where the whales an’ sharks are havin’ their larks,
Ten thousand miles away!

* 5 *

Oh, the sun may shine through the London fog,
Or the river run quite clear,
Or the ocean brine turn into wine,
or I forget me beer,
Or I forget me beer, m’ boys,
Or the landlord’s quarter-day,
But I’ll never forget me own true love,
Ten thousand miles away!

Related to this Forebitter

Ratcliffe Highway

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning

Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

Maggie May

Interesting Facts about the Maggie May

“Maggie May” was sung at the capstan in many Liverpool ships. The song tells the story of one of the most famous Liverpool ‘judy’ called Maggie May. We don’t know if it is a historical or fictitious character. According to stan Hugill, no other collector has mentioned this song, which was probably forebitter as well as a sea shanty. Words given by Stan Hugill are modified slightly, possibly due to bawdyness here and there.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the forebitter.

The source of this Forebitter

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 404).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 404,405).

The Record of the Maggie May

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Maggie May - Forebitter

The musical notation

Maggie May - music notation

The full lyrics

Jack All Alone

Come all ye sailors bold, an’ when me tale is told,
I know ye all will sadly pity me,
For I was a god damn fool in the port o’ Liverpool,
an the voyage when I first paid off from sea.

– Ooh, Maggie, Maggie May,
– They have taken you away,
– For to slave upon Van Dieman’s cruel shore,
– Oh, you robbed many a whaler an’ many a drunken sailor,
– But you’ll never cruise round Liverpool no more!

* 2 *

I paid off at the Home, after a voyage from Sierre Leone,
Two pound ten a month had been my pay;
As I jingled in me tin, I wuz sadly taken in,
By a lady of the name of Mggie may,

* 3 *

When I steered into her, I hadn’t got a care,
I wuz cruisin’ up an’ down ol’ Canning Place;
She wuz dressed in a gown so fine, like a frigate of the line,
An’ I bein’ a sailorman gave chase.

* 4 *

She gave me a saucy nod, an’ I like a farmer’s clod,
Let her take me line abreast in tow;
An’ under all plain sail, we ran before the gale,
An’ to the Crow’s Nest Tavern Tavern we did go.

* 5 *

Next mornin’ when I woke, I found that I wuz broke,
I hadn’t got a penny to me nyme;
So I had to pop me suit, me John L’s an’ me boots,
Down in the Park Lane pawn shop Number Nine.

* 6 *

Oh, you thievin’ Maggie May, ye robbed me of me pay,
When I slept wid you last night ashore,
Oh, guilty the jury found her, for robbin’ a homeward-bounder,
An’ she’ll never roll down Park Lane no more.

* 7 *

She wuz chained and sent away, from Liverpool one day,
The lads they cheered as she sailed down the Bay,
An’ every sailor lad, he only wuz too glad,
They’d sent the ol’ whore out to Botany Bay.

Related to this Forebitter

Ratcliffe Highway

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning

Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

The Liverpool Judies C

Interesting Facts about The Liverpool Judies C

“The Liverpool Judies C” was a very favorite capstan shanty among Liverpool ships. According to Stan Hugill, the song was of Irish origin and was sung in imitative Irish or Liverpool-Irish fashion. The song probably dates from the forties of the nineteenth century, since was popular in the Western Ocean Packets. Tune of this version Stan Hugill has from Spike Senit.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 402).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 402,403).

The Record of The Liverpool Judies C

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Liverpool Judies C - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The Liverpool Judies C - music notation

And the full lyrics

The Liverpool Judies C

When I wuz a youngster I sailed wid de rest,
On a Liverpool packet bound out ter the West,
We anchored wan day in the harbour o’ Cork,
Den we put art ter sea fer de port o’ New York.
– Singin’ ho! ro! ho! bullies ho!
– Them Liverpool judies have got us in tow.

* 2 *

For forty-two days we wuz hungry an’ sore,
Oh, the winds wuz agin us, the gales they did roar,
Off Battery Point we did anchor at last,
Wid our jibboom hove in an’ the canvas all fast.

* 3 *

De boardin’ house masters wuz off in a trice,
A-shoutin’ an’ promisin’ all that wuz nice,
An’ one fat ol’ crimp he got cottoned to me,
Sez he, ‘Yer a fool, lad, ter follow the sea.’

* 4 *

Sez, he ‘There’s a job as is waitin’ for you,
Wid lashin’s o’ liquor an’ beggar-all to do.’
Sez he, ‘What d’yer say, lad, will you jump her too?
Sez I, “Ye ol’ bastard, I’m damned if I do.’

* 5 *

But the best o’ intentions dey niver gits far,
After forty-two days at the door of a bar,
I tossed off me liquor an’ what d’yer think?
Why the lousy ol’ bastard had drugs in me drink.

* 6 *

The next I remembers I woke in the morn,
On a tree-skys’l yarder bound south round Cape Horn,
Wid an ol’ suit of oilskins an’ two pair of sox,
An’ a bloomin’ big head, an’ a sea-chest o’ rocks.

* 7 *

Now all ye young sailors take a warnin’ by me,
Keep a watch on yer drinks whin de liquor is free,
An’ pay no attintion to runner or whore,
Or yer head’ll be thick an’ yer throat’ll be sore.

Related to this sea shanty

Seafarers

Away Susanna!

Cant Ye Dance The Polka B

The Liverpool Judies B

Interesting Facts about The Liverpool Judies B

“The Liverpool Judies B” was a very favorite capstan shanty among Liverpool ships. According to Stan Hugill, the song was of Irish origin and was sung in imitative Irish or Liverpool-Irish fashion. The song probably dates from the forties of the nineteenth century, since was popular in the Western Ocean Packets. This version has the same theme but a different tune. Stan Hugill took this version from the old Irish seamen Paddy Delaney.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 402).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 401,402).

The Record of The Liverpool Judies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Liverpool Judies B - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The Liverpool Judies B - music notation

And the full lyrics

The Liverpool Judies B

From Liverpool to ‘Frisco a rovin’ I went,
For to stay in that country wuz my good intent,
But drinkin’ strong whisky like other damn fools,
Oh I soon got transported back to Liverpool,
– Singin’ ro-o-o-oll, o-o-o-oll, roll, bullies, roll!
– Them Liverpool judies have got us in tow!

* 2 *

A smart Yankee packet lies out in the Bay,
A-waitin’ a fair wind to get under way,
With all of her sailors so sick and sore,
They’d drunk all their limejuice and can’t git no more.

* 3 *

Oh, here comes the in a hell of a stew,
He’s lookin’ for graft for us sailors to do,
Oh, it’s ‘Fore tops’l halyards!’ he loudly does roar,
An’ it’s lay along Paddy, ye son-o’ -a-whore!

* 4 *

One night off Cape Horn I shall never forget,
‘Tis oft-times I sighs when I think o’ it yet,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn with her main-skys’l’set,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn wid us all wringin’ wet.

* 5 *

An’ now we are haulin’ ‘way on to the Line,
When I thinks o’ it now, sure, we had a good time,
Them sea-boys box-haulin’ their yards all around,
For to beat that flash packet called the ‘Thatcher MacGawn’

* 6 *

An’ now we’ve arrived in the Bramleymoor Dock,
An’ all them flash judies on the pierhead do flock,
The barrel’s run dry an’ our five quid advance,
An’ I guess it’s high timefor to git up an’ dance.

* 7 *

Here’s a health to the Capen wherever he may be,
A friend to the sailor on land or on sea,
But as for the chief mate, the dirty ol’ brute,
We hope when he dies straight to hell he’ll skyhoot.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

The Liverpool Judies A

Interesting Facts about The Liverpool Judies A

“The Liverpool Judies A” was a very favorite capstan shanty among Liverpool ships. According to Stan Hugill, the song was of Irish origin and was sung in imitative Irish or Liverpool-Irish fashion. The song probably dates from the forties of the nineteenth century, since was popular in the Western Ocean Packets.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 401).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 401,402).

The Record of The Liverpool Judies A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Liverpool Judies A - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The Liverpool Judies A - music notation

And the full lyrics

The Liverpool Judies A

From Liverpool to ‘Frisco a rovin’ I went,
For to stay in that country wuz my good intent,
But drinkin’ strong whisky like other damn fools,
Oh I soon got transported back to Liverpool,
– Singin’ ro-o-o-oll, o-o-o-oll, roll, bullies, roll!
– Them Liverpool judies have got us in tow!

* 2 *

A smart Yankee packet lies out in the Bay,
A-waitin’ a fair wind to get under way,
With all of her sailors so sick and sore,
They’d drunk all their limejuice and can’t git no more.

* 3 *

Oh, here comes the in a hell of a stew,
He’s lookin’ for graft for us sailors to do,
Oh, it’s ‘Fore tops’l halyards!’ he loudly does roar,
An’ it’s lay along Paddy, ye son-o’ -a-whore!

* 4 *

One night off Cape Horn I shall never forget,
‘Tis oft-times I sighs when I think o’ it yet,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn with her main-skys’l’set,
She was roundin’ Cape Horn wid us all wringin’ wet.

* 5 *

An’ now we are haulin’ ‘way on to the Line,
When I thinks o’ it now, sure, we had a good time,
Them sea-boys box-haulin’ their yards all around,
For to beat that flash packet called the ‘Thatcher MacGawn’

* 6 *

An’ now we’ve arrived in the Bramleymoor Dock,
An’ all them flash judies on the pierhead do flock,
The barrel’s run dry an’ our five quid advance,
An’ I guess it’s high timefor to git up an’ dance.

* 7 *

Here’s a health to the Capen wherever he may be,
A friend to the sailor on land or on sea,
But as for the chief mate, the dirty ol’ brute,
We hope when he dies straight to hell he’ll skyhoot.

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

La Margot

Interesting Facts about the La Margot

“La Margot” is the French capstan song. We can find this song in Hayet’s book “Chansons de bord” (1927). Stan Hugill tells us that Hayet under the name “Le Bihor”, in his other book “Chansons de la voile ‘Sans Voile'” gives uncamouflaged French matelot’s version, which has bawdy refrains and solos.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 398).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 398 – 400).

The Record of the La Margot

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

La Margot - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

La Margot - music notation

And the full lyrics

La Margot

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
Un’ jolie p’tit navire,
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
le captaine qui levi!
C’est mes mains qui sont,
De belle façon,
Les gabiers d’en-poin-tu-res
– Oh! hisse! et ho!
– Tire larigot,
– Hourra pour la Margot!

* 2 *

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
Un’ jolie p’tite énglise,
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
La recteur qui baptise!
C’est mes main qui sont,
De belle façon,
Les donners d’eau bénite.

* 3 *

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
Un’ jolie p’tite auberge,
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
La patron qui s’oberge!
C’est mes main qui sont,
De belle façon,
Las servants qui caressant.

* 4 *

Margot qu’est venue biribi,
La Reine de l’Empire!
Et c’est moi qui suis biribi,
Le Roi qu’elle soupire!
C’est mes main qui sont,
De belle façon,
Les pages qui lévent as jupe.

* 5 *

C’est Margot qu’aura biribi,
Mes louis, mes pistoles,
Mais si c’est moi qu’ai biribi,
Le malqui ne s’envole!
C’est mes mains qui s’ront,
De belle façon,
Un collier pour sa gorge!

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C