Blow Ye Winds (C)

Interesting Facts about the Blow Ye Winds (C)

Blow Ye Winds (C) is Joanna C. Colcord’s from the “Songs of American Sailormen” (1938), it is the whaling version, and the last line has been camouflaged. It was a common line in shanties, forebitters, and whaling songs:
Where the Old Man bought a whore-house out for half a barrel o’ flour.
Joanna C. Colcord obtained this song from an old logbook in the New Bedford Public Library.
Because music notation has a lot of differences, instead of Stan Hugill’s version “A”, I took melody straight from Miss Colcord’s book. This song will be reconstructed as a forebitter.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 219).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 223, 224).

The Record of the Blow Ye Winds (C)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Blow Ye Winds (C) - musical notation

The full lyrics

Blow Ye Winds (C)

‘Tis advertised in Boston, New York, and Buffalo,
Five hundred brave Americans a-whaling for to go.

– Singing blow, ye winds, in the morning,
– And blow, ye winds, high-O!
– Clear away yer running gear,
– And blow, ye winds, high-O!

* 2 *

They send you to New Bedford, that famous whaling port,
And give you to some land-sharks to board and fit you out.

* 3 *

They send you to a boarding house,there for a time to dwell;
The thieves they there are thicker than the other side of hell!

* 4 *

They tell you of the clipper ships a-going in and out,
And say you’ll take five hundred sperm, before you’re six months out.

* 5 *

It’s now we’re out to sea, my boys, the wind comes on to blow;
One half the watch is sick on deck, the other half below.

* 6 *

But as for the provisions, we don’t get half enough;
A little piece of stinking beef, and a blamed small bag of duff.

* 7 *

Now comes that damned old compass, it will grieve your heart full sore.
For theirs is two and thirty points, and we have forty four.

* 8 *

Next comes the running rigging, which you’re all supposed to know;
‘Tis “Lay aloft, you son of a gun, or overboard you go!”

* 9 *

The coopers’s at the vise bench, a-making iron poles,
And the mate’s upon the main hatch, a-cursing all our souls.

* 10 *

The Skipper’s on the quarterdeck, a-squinting at the sails,
When up aloft the lookout sights a school of whales.

* 11 *

“Now clear away the boats, my boys, And after him we’ll travel,
But if you get too near his fluke, he’ll kick you to the devil!”

* 12 *

Now we have got him turned up, we tow him alongside;
We over with our blubber hooks, and rob him of his hide.

* 13 *

Now the boat-steerer overside the tackle overhauls,
The Skipper’s in the main-chains, so loudly he does bawl!

* 14 *

Next comes the stowing down, my boys, ’twill take both night and day,
And you’ll all have fifty cents apiece on the hundred and ninetieth lay.

* 15 *

Now we are bound into Tonbas, that blasted whaling port,
And if you run away, my boys, you surely will get caught.

* 16 *

Now we are bound into Tuckoona, full more in their power,
Where the skippers can buy the Consul up for half a barrel of flour!

* 17 *

But now that our old ship is full and we don’t give a damn,
We’ll bend on all our stu’nsails and sail for Yankee land.

* 18 *

When we get home, our ship made fast, and we get through our sailing,
A winding glass around we’ll pass and damn this blubber whaling!

Related to this Forebitter

Ratcliffe Highway

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning

Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning

Interesting Facts about the Blow Ye Winds in the Morning

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, This song mentioned by Stan Hugill – “Shanties from the Seven Seas” (1961) on page 220, comes from W. B. Whall – “Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties” (1913, 3rd edition). As W. B. Whall mentioned in his book: “This was a song of the midshipman’s berth rather than the forecastle… “. In Captain Whall’s book we can find four stanzas for this song, and also commented, that other (that Captain Whall omitted), stanzas we can find in the ballad of Percy’s Reliques, “The Baffled Knight,” which this song is based on.
This song will be reconstructed as the Forebitter, which I think is not have a big difference from the musical point of view from a midshipman’s berth.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by W. B. Whall (4th extended edition 1913).

The lyrics:  “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by W. B. Whall (4th extended edition 1913).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 220).

The Record of the Blow Ye Winds in the Morning

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning - music notation

The full lyrics

Blow Ye Winds, in the Morning

As I walked out one sunny morn to view the meadows round,
I spied a preatty primose lass come tripping o’er the ground,

– Singing blow, ye winds, in the morning,
– Blow, ye winds, Hi! Ho!
– Brush away the morning dew,
– Blow, ye winds, Hi! Ho!

* 2 *

I saddled me an Arab steed and saddled her another,
And off we rode together just like sister and like brother.

* 3 *

We rode along untill we came to a field of new-mown hay,
Says she, “Young man this pis the place for men and maid to play.”

* 4 *

I took her from her Arab steed and gently laid her down,
Says she, “Young man, oh pray take care, you’ll spoil my new silk gown.”

Related to this Forebitter

Oh Susanna

Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

Roll Alabama Roll! – Forebitter

Ratcliffe Highway

Interesting Facts about the Ratcliffe Highway

Here is the old forebitter “Ratcliffe Highway”, which was sometimes sung at the pumps and the capstan, as told to Stan Hugill, his fellow sailor Paddy Delaney, who used to sail in the old days on the Packet Ships. As Stan Hugill tells us, regarding the words of this song, they were used in the first version of “Blow the Man Down”, which Stan Hugill calls in his book the “Blow the Man Down – A”.
As one of these Western Ocean shanties, I will reconstruct with a common introductory verse (first verse at the beginning).
I would also like to thank Artur Pietrzykowski for the wonderful illustration that you can find at the beginning of the record.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 200).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 200, 201).

The Record of the Ratcliffe Highway

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Ratcliffe Highway - music notation

The full lyrics

Ratcliffe Highway

    *introductory verse*

Come all ye young sailors an’ listen to me,
I’ll sing ye a song all about the high sea,
Now it tain’t very short, nor it tain’t very long,
‘Tis of a Flyin’ Fish Sailor just home from Hong Kong.

– Singin’ too-relye-addie, too-relye-addie,
– Singin’ too-relye-addie, aye, too-relye-ay!

* 1 *

Now as I wuz a walkin’ down Ratcliffe Highway,
A flash lookin’ packet I chanet for to say,
Of the port that she hailed from I cannot say much,
But by her appearance I took her for Dutch,

* 2 *

Her flag wuz three colours, her masthead wuz low,
She wuz round the counter an’ bluff at the bow.
From larboard to starboard an’ so sailed she,
She wuz sailing at large, she wuz runnin’ free.

* 3 *

She wuz bowlin’ along wid her wind blowin’ free;
She clewed up her courses an’ waited for me.
I fired me bow-chaser, the signal she knew,
She backed her maintops’l an’ for me hove to.

* 4 *

I hailed her in ENglish, she answered me clear,
I’m from the Black Arrow, bound to the Shakespeare,
So I wore ship an’ with a ‘What d’ya know?’
I passed ‘er me hawser an’ took ‘er in tow.

* 5 *

I tipped up my flipper an’ took her in tow,
And yard-arm to yard-arm away we did go,
She then took me up her lily-white room,
An’ there all the evening we drank and we spooned.

(Verses 6 and 7 omitted.)

* 6 *

Soon the evening did pass, boys, I lashed up an’ stowed,
I gave her some shillings ‘fore I left her abode,
But it ‘twarn’t quite enough, boys, she wanted some more,
She cursed me an’ called me a son-o’-a-whore.

She blazed like a frigate, at me she let fire,
An’ nothing could stem, boys, that Irish tart’s ire,
She kicked me an’ cursed me an’ stove in me jaw,
An’ I beat retreat through her open back-door.

* 7 *

I’ve fought wid the Russians, the Prussians also,
I’ve fought wid the Dutch, an’ wid Johnny Crapo,
But of all the fine fights that I ever did see,
She beat all the fights o’ the heathen Chinee.

* 8 *

Now all ye young sailors take a warnin’ I say,
Take it aisy, me boys, when yer down that Highway,
Steer clear of them flash gals, on the Highway do dwell,
Or they’ll take up yer flipper an’ yer soon bound ter Hell!

Related to this Forebitter

The Fishes – W. B. Whall

The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus)

Oh, Aye, Rio

The Fishes – W. B. Whall

Interesting Facts about The Fishes – W. B Whall

Here are The Fishes – W B Whall, forebitter version of the great shanty, sang usually at the capstan and at the pumps “The Fishes”. This version mentioned by Stan Hugill belonging to the W. B. Whall, and comes from his book “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” (4th extended edition 1913). According to Captain Whall:
…”this song, probably owed much of its popularity to the good chorus. This song has a good opportunity for the improviser. Even if he got off the beaten track it did not matter much, as any verse gave an opportunity for the chorus. Out
of many such I remember hearing:

” The next came the conger as long as a mile,
He gave a broad grin and continued to smile.”

Sometimes the improviser broke down, but the chorus promptly chipped in and saved the situation.
According to Stan Hugill, the version of W. B. Whall appears to have been used as a forebitter rather than as a shanty, and in this way, I will reconstruct it.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 198).

The lyrics:  “Sea Songs Ships & Shanties” by W. B. Whall (4th extended edition 1913).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 197,198).

The Record of The Fishes – W. B Whall

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Fishes (Whall) - music notation

The full lyrics

The Fishes (Whall)

Oh, a ship she was rigg’d, and ready for sea,
And all of her sailors were fishes to be

– Windy weather! Stormy weather!
– When the wind blows we’re all together.

* 2 *

O, the first came the herring, the king of the sea,
He jumped on the poop, “I’ll be captain,” said he.

* 3 *

The next was a flat-fish, they call him the skate,
“If you be the captain, why sure, I’m the mate.”

* 4 *

The next came the hake, as black as a rook,
Says he, “I’m no sailor, I’ll ship as the cook.”

* 5 *

The next came the shark, with his two rows of teeth,
“Cook, mind the cabbage and I’ll mind the beef.”

* 6 *

And then came the codfish, with his chuckle-head,
He jumped in the chains: began heaving the lead.

* 7 *

The next came the flounder, as flat as the ground,
“Chuckle-head, damn your eyes, mind how you sound.”

* 8 *

The next comes the mack’rel, with his stri-ped back,
He jumped to the waist for to board the main tack.

* 9 *

And then came the sprat, the smallest of all,
He jumped on the poop, and cried, “main topsail haul.”

Related to this Forebitter

Roll Alabama Roll! – Forebitter

Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

The Limejuice Ship (Long Chorus)

Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

Interesting Facts about The Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

Rolling Home – W. B. Whall, this time the forebitter version of the “Rolling Home”, this manner this forebitter has been sung. Version mentioned by Stan Hugill comes from Sea “Songs and Shanties” – Collected by W. B. Whall (1927), which is the sixth edition of this book. For more curious shanty lovers is worth noting that I have owned the second edition of the mentioned book, and by comparing I can say both descriptions and text are identical. Here is what Capitan Whall wrote about Rolling Home – W. B. Whall:
“There are numerous versions both on words and music: I have one such in an American book of sea songs dated 1876; Mr. Mansfield gives another version in his “Garland”; two other versions appeared some time back in the “Shipping Gazette”, and I have still another. I have legitimately, I think — chosen from all these the lines common to all, and for the rest have taken those that seemed to be the best. The tune I give–out of several variants–is the one familiar to me, though, as I have said, there are others”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Songs and Shanties” Collected by W. B. Whall (1927) 6th edition.

The lyrics:  “Songs and Shanties” Collected by W. B. Whall (1927) 6th edition.

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 187).

The Record of the Rolling Home – W. B. Whall

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Rolling Home - W. B. Whall - music notation

The full lyrics

Rolling Home (W. B. Whall)

Call all hands to man the capstan,
See the cable run down clear,
Heave away, and with the will, boys,
For old England, we will steer,

And We’ll sing in joyful chorus,
In the watches of the night,
And we,ll sight the shores of England,
When the grey dawn breaks the light.

– Rol-ling home, rolling home
– Rol
ling home across the sea,
– Rolling home to dear Old England,
– Rolling home, dear land, to thee.

* 2 *

Up aloft amid the rigging,
Blows the loud exulting gale;
Like a bird’s wide out-stretched pinions
Spreads on high each swelling sail;

And the wild waves cleft behind us,
Seem to murmur as they flow
There are loving hearts that wait you
In the land to which you go.

* 3 *

Many thousand miles behind us,
Many thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean heave to waft us
To the well-remembered shore.

Cheer up, Jack, bright smiles await you
From the fairest of the fair,
And her loving eyes will greet you
With kind welcomes everywhere.

Related to this Forebitter

The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus)

Oh Susanna

Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

Roll Alabama Roll! – Forebitter

Interesting Facts about Roll Alabama Roll! – Forebitter

This forebitter has a very similar tune to “Roll The Cotton Down”, “Roll Alabama Roll! – Forebitter”. Stan Hugill has “Roll The Cotton Down” – Forebitter version, from New Zeland Lady which he met, in New Zeland in 1925, whose husband had been a seaman in “Alabama”.

The source of this forebitter

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 159).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 159).

The Record of the Roll Alabama Roll! – Forebitter

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

roll-alabama-roll music notation

The full lyrics

Roll, Alabama, Roll!

Oh, in eighteen hundread an’ sixty one,
– ROLL, alabama, ROLL!
This ship her building wuz begun.
– Oh ROLL, alabama, ROLL!

* 2 *

When the Alabama’s keel was laid,
This ship her building was begun.

* 3 *

Oh, she was build in Birkenhead,
Built in the yard of Jonathan Laird

* 4 *

And down the Mersey she rolled one day,
An’ across the western she ploughed her way

* 5 *

With British guns, oh, she was stocked,
She sail from Fayal – in Cherbourg she docked.

* 6 *

To fight the North, Semmes did employ,
Any method to kill an’ destroy.

* 7 *

But off Cherbourg, the Kearsage lay tight,
Awaiting was Winslow to start a good fight.

* 8 *

Outside the three-mile limit they fought,
An’ Semmes escaped on a fine British yacht.

* 9 *

The Kersarge won – Alabama so brave,
Sank to the bottom to a watery grave.

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Interesting Facts about The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A) is an old Capstan song with other titles: “Harp without the Crown” or “The Shenandoah”. Miss Joanna Colcord gives it as a forebitter, and she says it was sung to a tune almost the same as that of “The Banks of Newf’n’land”.
The “Harp without the Crown” is a phrase hearkening back to rebellious times in Ould Ireland. According to Miss Colcord, Captain Jim Murphy of the “Shenandoah”, in actual fact, flew the Irish flag beneath the American one aboard his ship.

Stan Hugill gives us as a capstan shanty but because they are two versions, one I will do recreate as forebitter and another as capstan shanty. Both versions come from Stan Hugill’s shipmate Paddy Delaney (ex-blackball line sailor). So this version will be reconstructed as a forebitter.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141). I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill’s version from the album “Chants des Marins Anglais” (1992).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141).

The Record The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-gals-o-dublin-town-a music notation

The full lyrics

Naow, ’tis of a famous Yankee ship, to New York we wuz bound,
An’our cap’-n be-in’ an Oirish man, belongin’ to Dubalin Town,
– Hurrah! Hurrah! for the gals o’ Dub-a-lin Town,
– Hurrah for the bonnie green flag an’ the Harp without the Crown!

* 2 *

An’ when he gazes on that land, that town of high renown,
Oh, it’s away the green burgee and the Harp without the Crown.

* 3 *

‘Twas on the seventeenth o’ March, we arrived in New York Bay,
Our Capen bein’ an Irishman must celebrate the day.

* 4 *

With the Stars an’ Stripes ‘way high aloft, an’ flutterin’ all around,
But underneath his monkey-gaff flew the Harp without the Crown.

* 5 *

Now we’re bound for ‘Frisco, boys, an’ things is runnin’ wild,
The officers an’ men dead drunk, around the decks they pile.

* 6 *

But by termorrer mornin’, boys, we’ll work without a frown,
For on board the saucy ‘Shenandoah’ flies the Harp without the Crown!

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Limejuice Ship (Long Chorus)

Oh, Aye, Rio

Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

Interesting Facts about Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

In the case of Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation) song, Stan Hugill again mentioned the source “Sang under Segel” Sigurd’s Sternwall’s Swedish shanty book (Reference to its being sung at the capstan is to be found in the Preface, page 12). From this book, Stan Hugill gives us two verses and melody to this beautiful song, the construction of the verses is really close to Stephen Foster’s version of “Oh Susanna”. Additionally, worth noting this version is a personal translation of Stan Hugill, so I think it deserves to sing it.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 117).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 117).

The Record of the Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

Oh, I was born on Sweden’s Coast,
Where the fine ships sail along,
And a fine ship was my heart’s desire,
Since I was very young.

But the first time that he went aboard,
He kissed me tenderly,
And unto me he said these words,
‘You are all the word to me.’

– Oh, Susanna, now don’t ye cry for me,
– Be faithful to your sailor boy
– Till I come home from sea.

* 2 *

On a long voyage he went away,
I sat alone and sighed.
And when the wind was howling wild,
‘Tis oft at night I cried.

But when the tears ran down my cheecks,
My sailor boy came home.
He sang to me in deep content,
From these arms I’ll never roam.

– Oh, Susanna, oh, don’t ye cry for me,
– I’m homeward bound to you at last,
– And now I’m safe with thee.

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Susannavisan

Susannavisan (Swedish)

Interesting Facts about the Susannavisan

In the case of Susannavisan song, Stan Hugill again mentioned the source: “Sang under Segel”, Sigurd’s Sternwall’s Swedish shanty book (Reference to its being sung at the capstan is to be found in the Preface, page 12). From this book, Stan Hugill gives us two verses and melody to this beautiful song, the construction of the verses is really close to Stephen Foster’s version of “Oh Susanna”. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the “Sang under Segel”, but what I found in another book “Flottans Män Malmö visbok” (1942). In this book, I found another two verses of this great song, so my reconstruction will contain four verses. In „Flottans Män Malmö visbok”, I found another two verses of this great song, so my reconstruction will contain four verses.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 116).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 116). and “Flottans Män Malmö visbok” (1942) – last two verses.

The Record of the Susannavisan

I want to make a special thanks to Pontus Wallgren, who helped me with pronunciation to make it possible to sing this beautiful forebitter in the Swedish language.
“Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 116).

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

susannavisan music notation

The full lyrics

Susannavisan

Jag är född vid gamla Sveriges kust,
där den stolta skutan går,
och den stolta skutan, var min lust
från jag blott var sjutton år.

Men den första gång han gick ombord,
kysste han mig ven och huld,
och han sade vänligt dessa ord:
“Du är allt mitt hjärtas guld”.

– O Susanna, gråt inte för din vän,
– men bli mig alltid städse tro,
– tills jag kommer hem igen!

* 2 *

På den långa resan drog han bort,
jag satt ensam. O, min skatt!
Och när vädret det var riktigt hårt,
låg jag vaken mången natt.

Men när tåren bittert flöt på kind,
kom min sjöman hem i hamn
och så sjöng han med ett nöjsamt sinn´,
då han tryckte mig i famn:

– O Susanna, gråt inte för din vän!
– Jag gungat har uppå böljan blå,
– och här har du mig igen.

* 3 *

Och så talte vi så månget ord,
Vi förglömde storm och blåst,
Men en dag han sa: “Min tös, jag tror,
Vi behöver snart en präst.

Jag får ta en tur på två års tid,
Men är lyckan med din vän,
Kommer jag med rik’dom åter hit,
Och vi går till prästen hän.

– O, Susanna, gråt dock ej för mig!
– Jag till Kalifornien far
– Och gräver guld för dig.”

* 4 *

I ett litet hus vid kusten bor
Vi som lyckligt äkta par.
Han kom hem igen, han höll sitt ord.
Fyra raska barn vi har.

Han går icke mer på resor, nej!
Men när stormen rasar vild,
Han till barmen älskligt trycker mej
Och så säger han så mild:

– “O, Susanna, mitt allt, min fröjd och lust,
– Där finns ej man så glad som jag
– På hela Sveriges kust!”

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Blow Ye Winds (C)

Oh Susanna

Interesting Facts about the Oh Susanna

Oh, Susanna, another song from the time when the Gold Rush of 1849 happens was “Oh, Susanna”. Stan Hugill says, is that this song has never been in print, with exception of Miss Colcord’s fragmentary version listed in her book as a fo’c’sle song.

So this is what Joanna C. Colcord gives us in her book (“Songs of American Sailormen” – 1938, in the “Roll & Go” – 1924, in both books we can find, the same amount of verses):
“It was singular that with all the vast pride and delight of the sailor in his ship, so few songs were sung in celebration of the qualities of individual vessels. There was about California clipper “Sovereign of the Seas”, which went to the same tune as the ‘fourty-niners’ song”…

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Songs of American Sailormen” – by Joanna C. Colcord (1938).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 116).

The Record of the Oh Susanna

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

oh-susanna music notation

The full lyrics

Oh, Susanna

* 1 *

Holystone the cabin,
And get down on your knees,
None of your limejuice touches,
In the Sovereign of the Seas!

* 2 *

Oh, Susanna,
Darling, take your ease,
For we have beat the clipper fleet,
The Sovereign of the Seas!

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Susannavisan