Hieland Laddie (A)

Interesting Facts about the Hieland Laddie (A)

Here the one of the most famous “stamp-‘n’-go shanty Hieland Laddie (A). The “Hieland Laddie” comes from the old Scottish march and a dance tune, very popular as walkaway and capstan shanty in old Dundee whalers. In Ferris & Tozer collection appears as a halyard shanty (in this case of course without a grand chorus). Stan Hugill learned this version from Bosun Chenoworth who had sailed for years in the hard-bitten whaling ships of Dundee. Song with this amount of verses is obvious capstan shanty, to use as walkaway it sings at the unison, and used about half of the stanzas.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 143).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 143,144).

The Record of the Hieland Laddie (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

hieland-laddie-a music notation

The full lyrics

Hieland Laddie (A)

There wuz a laddie came from Scotland,
– Hie-land laddie! Bonnie laddie!
Bonnie ladie from far Scotland,
– Me Bonnie Hie-land laddie O!

– Way, hay an’ away we go!
– Hie-land laddie, bonnie ladie!
– Way, hay, an’ away we go!
– Me bonnie Hie-land laddie O!

* 2 *

Where have ye been all the day?
Where have ye been all the day?

* 3 *

I did not see ye doon the glen,
I did not see ye near the burn,

* 4 *

‘Nay, I wuz no doon the glen,
Nay I wuz no near the burn.

* 5 *

But I went to seek a road to fortune,
Thought I’d find a road to fortune.

* 6 *

I joined a ship an’ went a-sailin’,
Sailed far north an’ went a-whalin’.

* 7 *

Shipped far north on a Dundee whaler,
Shipped far north as a whalin’ sailor.

* 8 *

Bound away to Iceland cold,
Found much ice but not much gold.

* 9 *

Greenland is a cold country,
Not the place for you and me.

* 10 *

Thought it was a way to fortune,
But whalin’s not the road to fortune.

* 11 *

Wist meself in Bonnie Scotland,
Back agen in Bonnie Scotland.

* 12 *

We caught some whales an’ boiled their blubber,
Oil an’ fat chocked every scupper,

* 13 *

We’ll soon be homeward bound to Scotland,
Homeward bound to Bonnie Scotland.

* 14 *

I’ll be glad when I get hame,
I’ll give up this whalin’ game.

* 15 *

Oh, Hieland Laddie went a-sailin’,
Oh, Hieland Laddie went a-whalin’,

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (B)

Interesting Facts about The Gals O’ Dublin Town (B)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (B) is an old Capstan song with other titles: “Harp without the Crown” or “The Shenandoah”. Miss Joanna Colcord gives it shanty to us as a forebitter. She also said it; was sung by sailors to a tune almost the same; as that of “The Banks of Newf’n’land”.
The “Harp without the Crown” is a phrase hearkening back to rebellious times in Ould Ireland. According to Miss Colcord, Captain Jim Murphy of the “Shenandoah”, in actual fact, flew the Irish flag beneath the American one aboard his ship.
Stan Hugill gives us as a capstan shanty, but because they are two versions, one I will do recreate as forebitter and another as capstan shanty. Both versions come from Stan Hugill’s shipmate Paddy Delaney (ex-blackball line sailor). So this version I will do reconstructed; as a capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141). I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill’s version from the album “Chants des Marins Anglais” (1992).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141,142).

The Record of The Gals O’ Dublin Town (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (B)

Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool; sometimes we’re bound for France,
But now we’re bound to Dublin Town to give the gals a chance.
– Hurrah! Hurrah! for the gals o’ Dub-a-lin Town,
– Hurrah for the bonnie green flag an’ the Harp without the Crown!

* 2 *

Sometimes we’re bound for furrin’ parts, sometimes we’re bound for home,
A Johnny’s always at his best whenever he may roam.

* 3 *

Sometimes the weather’s fine an’ fair, sometimes it’s darn well foul,
Sometimes it blows a Cape ‘Orn gale that freezes up yer soul.

* 4 *

Sometimes we work as hard as hell, sometimes our grub it stinks,
Enough to make a sojer curse, or make a bishop blink.

* 5 *

Sometimes we wisht we’d niver jined, sometimes we’d like to be
A-drinkin’ in a pub, me bhoys, a gal sat on each knee.

* 6 *

Sometimes we are a happy crowd, sometimes we’ll sing a song,
Sometimes we wish we’d niver bin born, but we do not grouse for long.

* 7 *

An’ when the voyage is all done, an’ we go away on shore,
We’ll spend our money on the gals, ‘n’ go to sea for more!

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Interesting Facts about The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A) is an old Capstan song with other titles: “Harp without the Crown” or “The Shenandoah”. Miss Joanna Colcord gives it as a forebitter, and she says it was sung to a tune almost the same as that of “The Banks of Newf’n’land”.
The “Harp without the Crown” is a phrase hearkening back to rebellious times in Ould Ireland. According to Miss Colcord, Captain Jim Murphy of the “Shenandoah”, in actual fact, flew the Irish flag beneath the American one aboard his ship.

Stan Hugill gives us as a capstan shanty but because they are two versions, one I will do recreate as forebitter and another as capstan shanty. Both versions come from Stan Hugill’s shipmate Paddy Delaney (ex-blackball line sailor). So this version will be reconstructed as a forebitter.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141). I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill’s version from the album “Chants des Marins Anglais” (1992).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141).

The Record The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-gals-o-dublin-town-a music notation

The full lyrics

Naow, ’tis of a famous Yankee ship, to New York we wuz bound,
An’our cap’-n be-in’ an Oirish man, belongin’ to Dubalin Town,
– Hurrah! Hurrah! for the gals o’ Dub-a-lin Town,
– Hurrah for the bonnie green flag an’ the Harp without the Crown!

* 2 *

An’ when he gazes on that land, that town of high renown,
Oh, it’s away the green burgee and the Harp without the Crown.

* 3 *

‘Twas on the seventeenth o’ March, we arrived in New York Bay,
Our Capen bein’ an Irishman must celebrate the day.

* 4 *

With the Stars an’ Stripes ‘way high aloft, an’ flutterin’ all around,
But underneath his monkey-gaff flew the Harp without the Crown.

* 5 *

Now we’re bound for ‘Frisco, boys, an’ things is runnin’ wild,
The officers an’ men dead drunk, around the decks they pile.

* 6 *

But by termorrer mornin’, boys, we’ll work without a frown,
For on board the saucy ‘Shenandoah’ flies the Harp without the Crown!

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Limejuice Ship (Long Chorus)

Oh, Aye, Rio

Hurrah Hurrah Hurrah!

Interesting Facts about the Hurrah Hurrah Hurrah!

Here is the Hurrah Hurrah Hurrah! “Gangspill” or capstan shanty is very popular on german crew ships. A couple of words of description from the text: David Straat was well known in Hamburg “Sailortown”, where seamen used to congregate at the end of the voyage; The Groote Freiheit is an adjacent street off the Ripabahn.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 138). Stan Hugill took text from “Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag” Hans Sikorski (1936).

The lyrics: “Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag” Hans Sikorski (1936). After review of text i found couple spelling diferences, for reconstruction i used text from “Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag”.

The Record of the Hurrah Hurrah Hurrah!

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

hurrah-hurrah-hurrah music notation

The full lyrics

Hurrrah Hurrrah Hurrrah!

Un wenn wi nu na Hamborg Kamt, Denn went wi, wat wi doht,
denn kopt wi een for fiv Penn an’ne, Eck von’ne David-Straat,
– Hurrrah!Hur
rrah, Hurrrah, Hurrrah, Hurrrah!
denn kopt wi een for fiv Pennan’ne, Eck von’ne Davidstraat.

* 2 *

Un ok de luttje Mary, dat is ne fixe Deern,
Kriegst du de mol det Obends fot, denn kannst di nich besweern.
– Hur
rrah! Hurrrah, Hurrrah, Hurrrah, -Hurrrah!
denn kopt wi een for fiv Penn An’ne, Eck von’ne David Straat.

* 3 *

Un ok de dicke Anna, dat is ne feine Popp,
Kummt Janmaat von lang’ Reis’ torug, denn passt se em gliks op.
– Hurrrah! Hurrah…

* 4 *

Denn goht wi no St. Pauli rop, dor geiht dat lusting her.
Wenn se di seet, denn schreet se all: Du, Fitje, kumm mol her!

* 5 *

Un op de Groote Freiheit, wat is di dor en Larm,
Ear du di dat versehn deist, hest gliks ne Deern in’n Arm.

* 6 *

Un wenn de Huer verjuchheit is, denn weet ik wat ik do,
Ji kont mi alltosom mol fix, ik go no See hento.

Related to this sea shanty

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (B)

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Hourra Mes Boués Hourra! (French)

Interesting Facts about the Hourra Mes Boués Hourra!

Two french “Hourra” shanty include Hourra Mes Boués Hourra! give us Stan Hugill this one “Hourra, Mes Boues, Hurra!”, can be found in several french collections, Hayet, Bernard Roy, etc…, but Stan Hugill seems to favor Captain Hayet, and decided to give credit for saving this fantastic shanty from oblivion. Jean Loro, one of his friends of Stan Hugill teaches him to sing the second refrain often sung as: “Hourra, mes boues, hourra!”. This is a hauling shanty (chanson a hisser).

The source of this sea shanty

In comparing to the original text from Captain Hayet’s “Chansons De Bord”(1934), Stan Hugill gives nine verses instead of the original eleven, also the melody is a little bit different, but of course keeps the same dynamics. Due to the involvement of Jean Loro, I decided to reconstruct Stan Hugill’s melody and version, to keep the uniqueness of the song which seems to be known from the personal experience of Stan Hugill.

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 137).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 137).

The Record of the Hourra Mes Boués Hourra!

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

hourra-mes-boues-hourra music notation

The full lyrics

Hourra, Mes Boués, Hourra!

Derrière chez nous y’a un petit bois
– Hour-RA, mes boues, hour
RA!
Cueillis deux fraises, en mangis trois
– TRA la, la la, la la LA, la la!

* 2 *

Avec une fillett’ de quinze ans.
Sa mere arrive au meme instant,

* 3 *

Que faites-vous a mon enfant?
J’suis en train d’ lui compter les dents.

* 4 *

Il lui en manqu’ une sur le d’vant
Il lui en manqu’ une sur le d’vant

* 5 *

Que je lui pose bellement.
Que je lui pose bellement

* 6 *

Il m’en manqu’une egalement!
Il m’en manqu’une egalement!

* 7 *

Donnez-moi z’en, marin galant.
Donnez-moi z’en, marin galant

* 8 *

J’les pose qu’a cells de quinze ans.
J’les pose qu’a cells de quinze ans

* 9 *

Le vieilles pour le commandant!
Le vieilles pour le commandant!

Related to this sea shanty

A Long Time Ago (E)

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De Runer Von Hamborg

Drunken Sailor B (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about the Drunken Sailor (B)

Drunken Sailor (B) is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-‘n’-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work song allowed in the King’s Navee. In latter days, in bigger ships with smaller crews, it was mainly used at braces when ‘going about’ or to hand aloft a light sail such as stays’l – in this latter case it would then be used as a hand-over-hand song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 135).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).

The Record of the Interesting Facts about  Drunken Sailor (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

drunken-sailor-b music notation

The full lyrics

Drunken Sailor B

What shall we do with’a drunken sailor? x3
– Earleye in the mornin!
– Way, hay ‘n’ up she rises! x3
– Earlye in the mornin!

* 2 *

Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

* 3 *

Keep him there an’ make him bale her.

* 4 *

Trice him up in a runnin’ bowline.

* 5 *

Tie him to the taffrail when she’s yard-arm under.

* 6 *

Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

* 7 *

Take him an’ shake ‘im, an’ try an’ wake ‘im.

* 8 *

Give him a dose o’ salt an’ water.

* 9 *

Give him a taste o’ the bosun’s rope-end.

* 10 *

Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

* 11 *

What’ll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

* 12 *

Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

* 13 *

Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

* 14 *

What shall we do with a drunken solider?

* 15 *

Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

* 16 *

What shall we do with the Queen o’ Sheba?

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot

Drunken Sailor A (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about the Drunken Sailor (A)

Drunken Sailor (A) is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-‘n’-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work song allowed in the King’s Navee. This shanty was very popular in ships with big crews when at halyards; the crowd would seize the fall and stamp the sail up.

It is a very old shanty, having been sung in the Indiamen of the John Company. Olmstead gives a version with its tune in his book “Incidents of a Whaling Voyage”(1839) differing very little from the modern accepted one.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).

The Record of the Drunken Sailor (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

drunken-sailor-a musical notation

The full lyrics

Drunken Sailor (A)

– Way, hay an’ up she rises!
– Patent blocks o’ diff’rent sizes,
– Way, hay ‘n’ up she rises!
– Earlye in the mornin!

What shall we do wi’a drunken sailor? x3
– Earlye in the mornin!

* 2 *

Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

* 3 *

Keep him there an’ make him bale her.

* 4 *

Trice him up in a runnin’ bowline.

* 5 *

Tie him to the taffrail when she’s yard-arm under.

* 6 *

Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

* 7 *

Take him an’ shake ‘im, an’ try an’ wake ‘im.

* 8 *

Give him a dose o’ salt an’ water.

* 9 *

Give him a taste o’ the bosun’s rope-end.

* 10 *

Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

* 11 *

What’ll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

* 12 *

Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

* 13 *

Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

* 14 *

What shall we do with a drunken solider?

* 15 *

Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

* 16 *

What shall we do with the Queen o’ Sheba?

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (B)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot

Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations)

Interesting Facts about the Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations) …

Stan Hugill in his book apart from the two versions of this spectacular song gives us also additional, three variations of the first solo and refrains. Here they are. This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).

The Record of the Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notations

Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations) musical noration A
Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations) musical noration B
Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations) musical noration C

The full lyrics

Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation A)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
– To me way – ay – ay – hay – ho!

Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation B)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
– A.. ah – way – ay – ay, hoo – ray – ya!

Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation C)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
– To me way – ay – ay, hoo, ro, ya!

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)

Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)

Interesting Facts about Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)

The Blackball Line of packet ships started in 1816 as an American line running between New York and Liverpool. The ships were small roughly 300 to 400 tons. After 1850 were added ships over a thousand tonnes. Here Horraw version with the melody of a very popular tune with Liverpool Jacks. For this version, I will utilize the first verse from music notation and verses from page 132 of the first edition of “Shanties From The Seven Seas”. This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).

The Record of the Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

horraw-for-the-blackball-line-liverpool-jacks-tune music notation

The full lyrics

Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)

I served me time in the Blackball Line,
– Timme way, hay, a-way, yah!
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
– Hurraw for the Blackball Line!

* 2 *

Oh, around Cape Horn with a mainskys’l set,
Around Cape Stiff an’ we’re all wringing wet.

* 3 *

Oh, around Cape Stiff in the month o’ May,
Oh, around Cape Horn is a very long way.

* 4 *

It’s when the Blackballer is ready for sea,
The sights in the fo’c’sle is funny to see.

* 5 *

There’s tinkers and sogers an’ fakirs an’ all
All ship for prime sailors aboard the Blackball.

* 6 *

Now the packet ship she is crowdin’ on sail,
The wind from the south’ard is blowin’ a gale.

* 7 *

An’ when we git to ol’ New York Town,
We’ll meet ol’ Patrick an’ drink till we drown.

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Interesting Facts about the Horraw For The Blackball Line

Horraw For The Blackball Line was sung at the capstan or windlass All those shanties with words “Hurrah”, “Horray”, or “Horraw” in the refrain or chorus were known by sailors as “horraw choruses” and very often was said that “our wild horraw chorus soon raised the mud hook (or hoisted the tops’l)”. Here is one of the best “horraw choruses” shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 131).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 131).

The Record of the Horraw For The Blackball Line

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

horraw-for-the-blackball-line music notation

The full lyrics

Horraw For The Blackball Line

In the Blackball Line I served me time,
– To me way, hay, hoo, ro, yah
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
– Hooraw for the Blackball Line!

* 2 *

Blackball ships are good an’ true
They are the ships for me an’ you

* 3 *

That’s the Line where ye can shine
That’s the Line where I wasted me prime.

* 4 *

If yer wish to find a real goldmine,
Just take a trip on a Blackball ship

* 5 *

Just take a trip to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that Yankee school

* 6 *

Yankee sailors ye’ll see there,
With red-topped boots an’ short-cut hair.

* 7 *

There’s Liverpool Pat with his tarpaulin hat,
An’ Paddy Magee the Packet Rat

* 8 *

There was once a Blackball ship,
That fourteen knots an hour could slip.

* 9 *

They’ll carry ye along through the ice an’ snow,
They’ll thake ye where the winds don’t blow.

* 10 *

I’ve seen the Line both rise an’ shine,
An’ crossed the line in ’em many a time.

* 11 *

Oh, drink a health to the Blackball Line,
Their ships are stout an’ their men are fine.

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)