Roll The Old Chariot (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about Roll The Old Chariot

Roll The Old Chariot is one of the most popular “stamp-n-go” shanties. William Main Doerflinger in his “Shantymen and Shantyboys” (1951), says that it is based on the words of a Salvation Army revivalist hymn and that the tune is a Scottish reel. It seems without any doubt that the shanty is of Negro origin.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 151 ).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 151 ).

The Record of the Roll The Old Chariot

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

roll-the-old-chariot music notation

The full lyrics

Roll The Old Chariot

0h, a drop of Nelson’s blood wouldn’t do us any harm,
Oh, a drop of Nelson’s blood wouldn’t do us any harm,
0h, a drop of Nelson’s blood wouldn’t do us any harm,
And we’ll all hang on behind!


– So we’ll … ro-o-oll the old chariot along!
– And we’ll roll the golden chariot along!
– Oh, we’ll ro-o-oll the old chariot along!
– An’ we’ll all hang on behind!

* 2 *

0h, a plate of Irish stew wouldn’t do us any harm,
Oh, a plate of Irish stew wouldn’t do us any harm,
0h, a plate of Irish stew wouldn’t do us any harm,
And we’ll all…

* 3 *

Oh, a nice fat cook wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 4 *

Oh, roll in the clover wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 5 *

Oh, a long spell in goal wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 6 *

Oh, a nice watch below wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 7 *

Oh, a night with the gals wouldn’t do us any harm.

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Donkey Riding (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about the Donkey Riding

Donkey Riding a shanty is similar to “Hieland Laddie” and the almost identical tune is that known as “Donkey Riding”. This song was also very popular among the timber droghers both in Liverpool and Canadian ports, and by sailors was used as a capstan or “stamp-n-go” shanty when working with cargo. This version Stan Hugill took from his old shipmate called Spike Sennit, who said it was just as popular at sea as in port.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 147).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 147, 148).

The Record of the Donkey Riding

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

donkey-riding music notation

The full lyrics

Donkey Riding

Wuz ye ever in Quebec,
Launchin’ timber on the deck,
Where ye’d break yer bleed-in neck,
– Riding on a donkey?

– Way, hay an’ away we go!
– Donkey riding, donkey riding!
– Way, hay an’ away we go!
– Oh riding on a donkey?

* 2 *

Wuz ye ever in Timbucktoo,
Where the gals are black an’ blue,
An’ they waggle their bustles too,
– Riding…

* 3 *

Wuz ye ever in Vallipo,
Where the gals put on a show,
Waggle an’ dance with a roll ‘n’ go?
Riding…

* 4 *

Wuz ye ever down Mobile Bay,
Screwin’ cotton all the day,
A dollar a day is a white man’s pay?
Riding…

* 5 *

Wuz ye ever in Canton,
Where the men wear pigtails long,
And the gals play hong-ki-kong?
Riding…

* 6 *

Wuz you ever in London town,
Where the gals they do come down,
See the king in a golden crown?
Riding…

* 7 *

Wuz ye ever in Miramashee,
Where ye tie up to a tree,
An’ the skeeters do bite we?
Riding…

* 8 *

Wuz ye ever on the Broomielaw,
Where the Yanks are all the go,
An’ the boys dance hell an’ toe?
Riding…

* 9 *

Wuz ye ever down ‘Frisco Bay,
Where the gals all shoun, hooray,
Here comes Johnny with his three years’ pay!
Riding…

* 10 *

Wuz ye ever off Cape Horn,
Where the weather’s niver warm,
When ye wish to hell ye’d niver bin born?
Riding…

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (B)

Roll The Old Chariot

Drunken Sailor B (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about the Drunken Sailor (B)

Drunken Sailor (B) is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-‘n’-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work song allowed in the King’s Navee. In latter days, in bigger ships with smaller crews, it was mainly used at braces when ‘going about’ or to hand aloft a light sail such as stays’l – in this latter case it would then be used as a hand-over-hand song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 135).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).

The Record of the Interesting Facts about  Drunken Sailor (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

drunken-sailor-b music notation

The full lyrics

Drunken Sailor B

What shall we do with’a drunken sailor? x3
– Earleye in the mornin!
– Way, hay ‘n’ up she rises! x3
– Earlye in the mornin!

* 2 *

Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

* 3 *

Keep him there an’ make him bale her.

* 4 *

Trice him up in a runnin’ bowline.

* 5 *

Tie him to the taffrail when she’s yard-arm under.

* 6 *

Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

* 7 *

Take him an’ shake ‘im, an’ try an’ wake ‘im.

* 8 *

Give him a dose o’ salt an’ water.

* 9 *

Give him a taste o’ the bosun’s rope-end.

* 10 *

Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

* 11 *

What’ll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

* 12 *

Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

* 13 *

Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

* 14 *

What shall we do with a drunken solider?

* 15 *

Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

* 16 *

What shall we do with the Queen o’ Sheba?

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot

Drunken Sailor A (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about the Drunken Sailor (A)

Drunken Sailor (A) is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-‘n’-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work song allowed in the King’s Navee. This shanty was very popular in ships with big crews when at halyards; the crowd would seize the fall and stamp the sail up.

It is a very old shanty, having been sung in the Indiamen of the John Company. Olmstead gives a version with its tune in his book “Incidents of a Whaling Voyage”(1839) differing very little from the modern accepted one.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).

The Record of the Drunken Sailor (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

drunken-sailor-a musical notation

The full lyrics

Drunken Sailor (A)

– Way, hay an’ up she rises!
– Patent blocks o’ diff’rent sizes,
– Way, hay ‘n’ up she rises!
– Earlye in the mornin!

What shall we do wi’a drunken sailor? x3
– Earlye in the mornin!

* 2 *

Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

* 3 *

Keep him there an’ make him bale her.

* 4 *

Trice him up in a runnin’ bowline.

* 5 *

Tie him to the taffrail when she’s yard-arm under.

* 6 *

Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

* 7 *

Take him an’ shake ‘im, an’ try an’ wake ‘im.

* 8 *

Give him a dose o’ salt an’ water.

* 9 *

Give him a taste o’ the bosun’s rope-end.

* 10 *

Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

* 11 *

What’ll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

* 12 *

Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

* 13 *

Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

* 14 *

What shall we do with a drunken solider?

* 15 *

Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

* 16 *

What shall we do with the Queen o’ Sheba?

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (B)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot