Johnny Bawker (Sweating-up)

Interesting Facts about the Johnny Bawker

“Johnny Bawker” is another shanty from Stan Hugill’s “Johnny” shanties family. It was the shanty used for sheets. It was used for ‘sweating up’, i.e. to give a final drag on a halyard to gain the last inch, at tacks and sheets. Stan Hugill also mentions that this song was used for bunting sails, quite a unique theory because this job was considered the prerogative of “Paddy Doyle” shanty (we don’t know if Stan Hugill saw this song in action when sails were bunting or if this is only the theory). Another interesting fact is that the final “DO” was grunted out staccato, or rather the word was sung to its correct note and then a rising, gasped-out ‘UGH” would follow as the pull came.

And in end due to the specifics of the “sweetening up” job (final pulls), would not take more than three or four verses at the most. For my reconstruction, I select five verses which are more than enough for the described job.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 289).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 289, 290).

The Record of  the Johnny Bawker

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Johnny Bawker - music notation

The full lyrics

Johnny Bawker

Ooh! do, me Johnny Bowker, Come rock ‘n’ roll me over,
– Oh do me Johnny Bowker do!

* 2 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, Come roll me down to Dover,

* 3 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, lets’ all go on a Jamboree.

* 4 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the watches are cala-la-shee.

* 5 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the chief mate he’s a croaker.

* 6 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the Old Man he’s a soaker.

* 7 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the bosun’s never sober.

* 8 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, I bet ye are a rover.

* 9 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the he is a tailor.

* 10 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the chips he ain’t no sailor.

* 11 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, come roll me in the clover.

* 12 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, come rock an’ roll ‘er over.

* 13 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, from Calais down to Dover.

* 14 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, in London lives yer lover.

* 15 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, the packet she is rollin’.

* 16 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, come haul away the bowline.

* 17 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, we’ll either break or bend it.

* 18 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, we’re men enough to mend it.

* 19 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, get round the corner, Sally.

* 20 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, let me an’ you live tally.

* 21 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, we’ll haul away an’ bend ‘er.

* 22 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, me sweethart’s young an’ tender.

* 23 *

O do, me Johnny Bowker, one more pull then choke ‘er.

Related to this sea shanty

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

Johnny Come-A-Long

Interesting Facts about the Johnny Come-A-Long

“Johnny Come-A-Long”, a stamp-‘n’-go shanty popular in German ships. Stan Hugill took this shanty from “Knurrhahn” Seemannslieder und Shanties (Zweiter Band) by Richard Baltzer; Klaus Prigge; Knurrhahn-Lotsen-Gesangverein (1936). In comparison, Stan Hugill’s version is slightly different in text and almost identical in music to the “Knurrhahn” version, also title “Knurrhahn” is different (The title from “Knurrhahn” is “Johnny” you can find on page 90 and 91).

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 286).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 273).

The Record of the Johnny Come-A-Long

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Johnny Come-A-Long - music notation

The full lyrics

Johnny Come-A-Long

Oh, Johnny, Johnny, John,
Come along, come along,
Oh, Johnny, Johnny, John, come along,
Dont stand there like a silly ol’ fool,
don’t stand there a lookin’ so cool,
Dont be shy of the ladies,
an’ the teeth in his mouth want bang-bang!

– Down by the sea, Where the watermelon grow,
– Back to my home, I shall not go,
– And shall I dream of love’s sweet song,
– Who can be happier than a sailor tonight?

* 2 *

Oh, Johnny, Johnny, John,
Was a sailorman,
He’d bin around all day,
Jolin’ with the ladies, playin’ hide’n’seek,
Not a penny to pay for to have a little peek,
Happy as the day went high-diddle-dee,
An’ the girls all shouted bang-bang!

* 3 *

Oh, Johnny, Johnny, John,
In the garden with his gun,
Monkey’s been a-playin’ all the day,
Johnny takes his gun and the gun was loaded,
Johnny took his gun and the gun exploded,
High-diddle-dee, high-diddle-bum,
An’ he never let it go bang-bang!

* 4 *

Oh, Johnny, Johnny, John,
Git along, git along,
Leave little ladies on the shore,
Keep off, John, leave the girls alone,
Say goodbye an’ sail away for home,
Don’t hang round any more,
An’ his ol’ knees went bang-bang!

Related to this sea shanty

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

Interesting Facts about the Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

“Rise Me Up From Down Below”, stamp-‘n’-go shanty. Doerflinger took this song from “Lemon” Curtis, and says it is one of his favored songs. Negro origin shanty which combined the functions of a regular halyard shanty and a “walk away (stamp-‘n’-go)” song. In hoisting topgallants to this shanty, the men would first take two “drags” on the rope and then “walk away” with it. The pulls came on “WHISKEY Oh, JOHNny Oh,” while the rest of the chorus was sung as the men stamped along the deck gripping the halyard.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
The lyrics: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 281, 282).

The Record of the Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Rise Me Up From Down Below - Doerflinger - music notation

The full lyrics

Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

Oh, I come from the world below.
That is where the cocks do crow.

– Whisky O, Johnny O!
– Oh, Rise me up from down below,
– Down below, Oh Oh Oh Oh!
– Up aloft this yard must go, John.
– Rise me up from down below.

* 2 *

I come from the world below!
That is where the fires do roar.

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot (Stamp-n-go)

Rise Me Up From Down Below

Interesting Facts about the Rise Me Up From Down Below

Here is another great stamp-‘n’-go shanty, “Rise Me Up From Down Below”. According to Harding Barbarian, Stan Hugill’s shipmate this song was very popular on Yankee ships with Coloured crews. Harding also said that the tune is the Jamaican work song taken to sea by West Indian seamen and modify it to their needs.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 281).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 281).

The Record of the Rise Me Up From Down Below

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Rise Me Up From Down Below - music notation

The full lyrics

Rise Me Up From Down Below

I’m just up from the world below,
That is where the cocks do crow,

– Whisky O, Johnny O!
– Rise me up from down below,
– Down below, Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh!
– Rise me up from down below, boys
– Rise me up from down below!

* 2 *

I an the ghost of the Bertie Binns,
Cut down wuz I for me ‘orrible sins.

* 3 *

Me only home is down below,
They’ve let me out for an hour or so.

* 4 *

An’ when the cocks begin to crow,
‘Tis time for me to roll ‘n’ go.

* 5 *

Back in a hurry to the southern shore,
That is where the fires do roar.

* 6 *

I’ll tell yuh, boys ’tis hot in hell,
An’ I should know the place damn well.

* 7 *

An’ now the bleedin’ sail is set,
Back to me hole I’ll have ter get.

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot (Stamp-n-go)

John Dameray (Harding)

Interesting Facts about the John Dameray (Harding)

This shanty is known as “Johnny, Come Down the Backstay” or “John Dameray”. Stan Hugill claims it was a stamp-‘n’-go shanty, and a favorite in Yankee ships according to his shipmate Harding Barbadian, the Barbarian. This song was sung at the braces.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 273).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 273).

The Record of the John Dameray (Harding)

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

John Dameray (Harding) - music description

The full lyrics

John Dameray (Harding)

Around Cape Horn we go – o,
– Johnny, come-down the backstay,
Trough wind an’ rain an’ snow – o,
Johnny, come-down the backstay,

– Johny, come down the backstay, John Damaray-ay
Johnny, come down the backstay, John Damaray-ay,
Johny, come down the backstay, John Damaray-ay,

* 2 *

Hoist her from down below,
Through wind an’ rain an’ sno-ow,

* 3 *

Oh, shake her as she ro-olls,
For John’s a bully so-oul.

* 4 *

“Tis time now for our smoko,
The Ol’ Man he’s gone loco.

* 5 *

When I gits me feet ashore,
From sea I won’t go mo-ore.

* 6 *

From sea I will steer cle-ear,
An’ stick to drinkin’ beer.

Related to this sea shanty

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Young Girls Cant You Hilo? (short drag)

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Interesting Facts about the John Dameray (Silsbee)

This shanty is known as “Johnny, Come Down the Backstay” or “John Dameray”. Stan Hugill claims it was a stamp-‘n’-go shanty, and a favorite in Yankee ships according to his shipmate Harding Barbadian, the Barbarian. This particular version comes from William Main Doerflinger in his “Shantymen And Shantyboys” (1951). William Doerflinger mentioned this song was sung at the braces, on American vessels, according to a manuscript by the late Nathaniel Silsbee of Cohasset, Massachusetts. Mr. Silsbee learned this shanty at sea in the 1880s and set down the words in 1893. Song refers to the sailor stunt of sliding down the backstays – a quick way of getting on deck from high aloft.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
The lyrics: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 272).

The Record of the John Dameray (Silsbee)

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

John Dameray (Silsbee) - music notation

The full lyrics

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Aloft we all must go-oh,
– John come down the backstay,
In hail and frost and snow-oh,
– John come down the backstay,
John Dameray!

– John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John-Dameray!

– John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John
Dameray!

* 2 *

My ma she wrote to me,
“My son, come home from sea.”

* 3 *

Got no monay and no clo’es,
Am knocking out of doors.

* 4 *

My home I soon will be in,
And then we’ll have some gin.

* 5 *

From sea I will keep clear,
And live by selling beer.

Related to this sea shanty

Donkey Riding (Stamp-n-go)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Young Girls Cant You Hilo? (short drag)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Interesting Facts about Young Girls Cant You Hilo

The “Cant Ye Hilo” is a hauling shanty. According to Stan Hugill, it has West Indian origin, and he gets this shanty from his West Indian friend Harding the Barbarian, Barbadian.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 265).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 265).

The Record of the Cant Ye Hilo?

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Cant Ye Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Cant Ye Hilo?

Young gals love to dance wi’ Jack,
– Young gals can’t ye Hilo?
I have al-ways had me whack,
– Young gals can’t ye Hilo?

* 2 *

Youn gals, good gals, bad gals, O!
I will take ’em all in tow,

* 3 *

Love ’em both old an’ young,
Thin gals, fat gals, let ’em all come.

* 4 *

When I wuz a young man in me prime,
I chased them coloured gals all the time.

* 5 *

Dance, gals dance, till the break o’ day,
Let’s all dance our cares away.

* 6 *

High brown, dark brown, yeller gals, O!
Let’s all go on a big Hilo!

* 7 *

Young gals, young gals, young gals, O,
Rouse ‘er up an’ let’s Hilo!

Related to this sea shanty

Donkey Riding (Stamp-n-go)

Drunken Sailor A (Stamp-n-go)

Young Girls Cant You Hilo? (short drag)

Young Girls Cant You Hilo? (short drag)

Interesting Facts about Young Girls Cant You Hilo

Here hauling shanty “Young Girls, Cant You Hilo?”, this particular version comes from Captain Robinson from his article in “The Bellman” magazine (1917, July 28). Judging from the shanties of Capitan Robinson, Stan Hugill claims that Captain John Robinson spent most of his time in the West Indian, Gulf Ports, and West Coast of South America Trades.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Bellman” magazine (1917, July 28) by Capitan Robinson (1st ed: p 264).
The lyrics: “The Bellman” magazine (1917, July 28) by Capitan Robinson (1st ed: p 264).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 264).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Young Girls Cant You Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Young Girls, Cant You Hilo?

Young-girls, Young Girls, Young Girls, Ho!
– Young Girls, Can’t You Hilo!?
Young-girls, Young Girls, Young Girls, Ho!
– Young Girls, Can’t You Hilo!?

Related to this sea shanty

Donkey Riding (Stamp-n-go)

Drunken Sailor A (Stamp-n-go)

Drunken Sailor B (Stamp-n-go)

Roll The Old Chariot (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about Roll The Old Chariot

Roll The Old Chariot is one of the most popular “stamp-n-go” shanties. William Main Doerflinger in his “Shantymen and Shantyboys” (1951), says that it is based on the words of a Salvation Army revivalist hymn and that the tune is a Scottish reel. It seems without any doubt that the shanty is of Negro origin.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 151 ).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 151 ).

The Record of the Roll The Old Chariot

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

roll-the-old-chariot music notation

The full lyrics

Roll The Old Chariot

0h, a drop of Nelson’s blood wouldn’t do us any harm,
Oh, a drop of Nelson’s blood wouldn’t do us any harm,
0h, a drop of Nelson’s blood wouldn’t do us any harm,
And we’ll all hang on behind!


– So we’ll … ro-o-oll the old chariot along!
– And we’ll roll the golden chariot along!
– Oh, we’ll ro-o-oll the old chariot along!
– An’ we’ll all hang on behind!

* 2 *

0h, a plate of Irish stew wouldn’t do us any harm,
Oh, a plate of Irish stew wouldn’t do us any harm,
0h, a plate of Irish stew wouldn’t do us any harm,
And we’ll all…

* 3 *

Oh, a nice fat cook wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 4 *

Oh, roll in the clover wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 5 *

Oh, a long spell in goal wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 6 *

Oh, a nice watch below wouldn’t do us any harm.

* 7 *

Oh, a night with the gals wouldn’t do us any harm.

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Donkey Riding (Stamp-n-go)

Interesting Facts about the Donkey Riding

Donkey Riding a shanty is similar to “Hieland Laddie” and the almost identical tune is that known as “Donkey Riding”. This song was also very popular among the timber droghers both in Liverpool and Canadian ports, and by sailors was used as a capstan or “stamp-n-go” shanty when working with cargo. This version Stan Hugill took from his old shipmate called Spike Sennit, who said it was just as popular at sea as in port.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 147).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 147, 148).

The Record of the Donkey Riding

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

donkey-riding music notation

The full lyrics

Donkey Riding

Wuz ye ever in Quebec,
Launchin’ timber on the deck,
Where ye’d break yer bleed-in neck,
– Riding on a donkey?

– Way, hay an’ away we go!
– Donkey riding, donkey riding!
– Way, hay an’ away we go!
– Oh riding on a donkey?

* 2 *

Wuz ye ever in Timbucktoo,
Where the gals are black an’ blue,
An’ they waggle their bustles too,
– Riding…

* 3 *

Wuz ye ever in Vallipo,
Where the gals put on a show,
Waggle an’ dance with a roll ‘n’ go?
Riding…

* 4 *

Wuz ye ever down Mobile Bay,
Screwin’ cotton all the day,
A dollar a day is a white man’s pay?
Riding…

* 5 *

Wuz ye ever in Canton,
Where the men wear pigtails long,
And the gals play hong-ki-kong?
Riding…

* 6 *

Wuz you ever in London town,
Where the gals they do come down,
See the king in a golden crown?
Riding…

* 7 *

Wuz ye ever in Miramashee,
Where ye tie up to a tree,
An’ the skeeters do bite we?
Riding…

* 8 *

Wuz ye ever on the Broomielaw,
Where the Yanks are all the go,
An’ the boys dance hell an’ toe?
Riding…

* 9 *

Wuz ye ever down ‘Frisco Bay,
Where the gals all shoun, hooray,
Here comes Johnny with his three years’ pay!
Riding…

* 10 *

Wuz ye ever off Cape Horn,
Where the weather’s niver warm,
When ye wish to hell ye’d niver bin born?
Riding…

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (B)

Roll The Old Chariot