As Off to The South’ard We Go – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the As Off to The South’ard We Go

“As Off to The Southard We Go” is the shanty from the “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906), mentioned by Stan Hugill on the occasion of the description of the “Heave Away Cheerily O!” shanty. I have to mention Stan Hugill’s description that which says the song is the capstan song, but In Ferris & Tozer’s book is in the chapter “Anchor Songs”. So what is the difference? Well, the “capstan songs” is a more general term, due to the capstan can be used in many more sailor works than raise the anchor.

Raising the anchor happens only on the main capstan, and the tempo is quite established. But the term anchor song is ambiguous as well because the anchor can be raised by using the capstan or brake windlass. The song can be sung for both due to the usual timing used for brake-windlass work being 2/4 or 6/8 (same as on the music notation), so I decided to reconstruct this song as the Brake Windlass Shanty.


One more issue is that Stan Hugill suggested that this song was published in the first edition of the Davis & Tozer book, which is not true because I have a copy of this book and in the first set of 24 shanties from the book this shanty not appeared. I cannot confirm that song is on the second edition, but also I have the third edition of the book which contains a set of 50 shanties, and the song appear on page 28 and 29, the third edition has been in print in 1906.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906).
The lyrics: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 309, 310).

The Record of the As Off to The South’ard We Go

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

As Off to The South'ard We Go - music notation

And the full lyrics

As Off to The South’ard We Go

The wind is free, and we’re bound for sea,
– Heave away cheerily, ho, oh!
The lasses are waving to you and to me,
– As off to the South’ard we go-o,
– As off to the South’ard we go.

– Sing, my lads, cheerily,
– Heave, my lads, cheerily,
– Heave away cheerily, oh, oh!
– For gold that we prize, And sunier skies,
– Away to the South’ard we go.

* 2 *

They’re waving good-bye and with tearful eye,
Sing cheer up, my darling, and wipe your tears dry,

* 3 *

They’re crying “Come back, my dear Tom or dear Jack!
There’s water in front, and no door at the back,

* 4 *

We want sailors bold, who can work for their gold,
And stand a good wetting without catching cold,

* 5 *

The sailor is true to his Sal or his Sue,
As long as he’s able to keep ’em in view,

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Heave Away Me Johnnies C – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies C

“Heave Away Me Johnnies C” initially was a genuine brake-windlass shanty. Brake-windlass work was too heavy to move levers up and down, so movement from top to bottom has mid-step on the waist. The usual timing used was 2/4 or 6/8. This particular version is the ‘milkmaid’ version, a very popular theme in many shanties. This milkmaid version is very close to Cecil Sharp ones. Stan Hugill gives to us only five verses due to most of the verses from this version were unprintable.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 303).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 307).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies C

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Me Johnnies C - music notation

And the full lyrics

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

As I walked out one mornin’ fair, all in the month of May,
– Heave away ay ay, me Johnnies, heave away-away!
I overhauled a pretty maid and unto her did say,
– An away me bully boys, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

‘Oh, where are ye goin’ to, my pretty maid?’ I unto her did say.
‘I’m going a milking, sir,’ she said, all in the month of May.

* 3 *

‘Shall I go with you, my pretty maid?’ I unto her did say.
‘Oh, yes, if you please, kind sir,’ she said, all in the month of May.

* 4 *

‘Oh, what is your father, my pretty maid?, I unto her did say.
‘My father’s farmer, kind sir,’ she said, all in the month of May.

* 5 *

‘Oh, what is your fortune, my pretty maid? I unto her did say.
‘My face is my fortune, sir,’ she said, all in the month of May.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Heave Away Me Johnnies A – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies A

“Heave Away Me Johnnies A” initially was a genuine brake-windlass shanty. Brake-windlass work was too heavy to move levers up and down, so movement from top to bottom has mid-step on the waist. The usual timing used was 2/4 or 6/8. This song is one of My first recorded shanties from Stan Hugill’s “Shanties From the Seven Seas” book I recorded.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 303).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 303, 304).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Me Johnnies A - music notation

And the full lyrics

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Oh as I walked out one summer’s morn, (SLOW)
Down by the Salthouse Docks, (QUICKER)
– Heave away, me Johnnies, heave away-away!
I met an emigrant Irish gal, (SLOW)
conversin’ with Tapscott, (QUICKER)
– An away me bully boys, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

‘Good mornin’, Mister Tapscott, sir’, ‘Good-mornin, me gal,’ sez he,
‘Oh, it’s have jiz got a packet-ship, All bound for Amerikee?’

* 3 *

‘Oh, yes I have got a packet-ship, I have got one or two,
I’ve got the Jinny Walker and I’ve got the Kangaroo.

* 4 *

‘I’ve got the Jinny Walker and today she does set sail,
With five an’ fifty emigrants an’ a thousands bags o’ meal.’

* 5 *

The day was fine when we set sail, but night had barely come,
An’ every lubber never ceased to wish himself at home.

* 6 *

That night as we was sailin’ through the Channel of St. James,
A dirty nor’west wind came up an’ druv us back again.

* 7 *

We snugged her down an’ we laid her to, with reefed main tops’l set,
It was no joke I tell you, ‘cos our bunks an’ clothes wuz wet.

* 8 *

It cleared up fine at break o’ day, an’ we set sail once more,
An’ every son-o’-a-gun wuz glad when we reached Amerikee’s shore.

* 9 *

Bad luck to them Irish sailor-boys, bad luck to them I sais,
For they all got drunk, broke into me bunk, an’ stole me clothes away.

* 10 *

‘Twas at the Castle Gardens, oh, they landed me ashore,
An’ if I marry a Yankee boy, I’ll cross the seas no more.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French) – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso is another French hauling shanty that originally comes from Captain A. Hayet’s version (Chansons de Board; 1927). Fortunately, I found the book by A. Hayet mentioned by Stan Hugill. This song is the combination of “Goodbye, Fare-ye-well” and “Blow The Man Down”. Unusually consist of four solos and for refrains. H. Jacques says that this shanty was a traditional one among the seamen of the sailing ships which loaded saltpeter in Chilean ports, but the song is much older, potentially beginning of the nineteenth century, sang by whalers of the south seas.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Chansons de Board” by Armand Hayet (1st ed p 52, 53, 54). In the comparison process, I did discover some of the musical notations were different than in Stan Hugill’s book, so I took precedence of older sources, and for reconstruction used original notes from “Chansons de Board”. This shanty I will try to reconstruct in the original version from Captain A. Hayet’s “Chansons de Board”.

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 129, 130).

The Record of the Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.


The musical notation

et-nous-irons-a-valparaiso music notation

The full lyrics

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

Hardi! les gars, vire au guindeau
– Good bye, farewell!
– Good bye, farewell!
Hardi! les gars, adieu Bordeaux!
– Hourra! o-h! Mexico!
– 0h! -oh! oh!
Au Cap Horn il ne fera pas chaud
– Haul away, he!
– Oula tchalez!
A faire la peche au cachalot
– Hal’ matelot
– He! ho! hisse he! ho!

* 2 *

Plus d’un y laissere sa peau
– Good bye, farewell!
– Good bye, farewell!
Adieu misere, adieu bateau!
– Hourra! oh! Mexico!
– 0h! oh! oh!
Et nous irons a Valparaiso
– Haul away, he!
– Oula tchalez!
Ou d’autres laisseront leurs os
– Hal’ matelot
– He! ho! hisse he! ho!

* 3 *

Ceux qui r’viendront pavillon haut
– Good bye, farewell!
– Good bye, farewell!

C’est premier brin de matelot
– Hourra! 0h! Mexico!
– 0h!
oh! oh!
Pour la bordee ils seront a flot
– Haul away, he!
– Oula tchalez!
Bons pour le rack, la fille, le couteau
– Hal’ matelot
– He! ho! hisse he! ho!

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version) – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

The Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version), is Cecil Sharp’s version of “English Folk Chanteys” (1914). Sharp’s shantyman sings of what one can see when one arrives in port. “Rio Grande” was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. In “Shanties from the Seven Seas” Stan Hugill Mentioned only this version.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “English Folk-Chanteys” (1914) – Cecil J. Sharp (1st ed p 24).

The lyrics: “English Folk-Chanteys” (1914) – Cecil J. Sharp (1st ed p 14).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 93).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

bound-for-the-rio-grande-cecil-sharp-version - musical notation

The full lyrics

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

I think I heard the old man say:
– O you Rio,
I think I heard the old man say:
– We’re bound for Rio Grand.

– And away, for Rio,
– O you Rio,
– So fare you well, my bonny young girl,
– We’re bound for Rio Grand.

* 2 *

O Rio Grand is my native land.
O Rio Grand is my native land.

* 3 *

It’s there that I wound take my stand.
It’s there that I wound take my stand.

* 4 *

She’s buxom young maid with a rolling black eye.
She’s buxom young maid with a rolling black eye.

* 5 *

She came from her dwelling a long way from here.
She came from her dwelling a long way from here.

* 6 *

I wish I was in Rio to-day.
I wish I was in Rio to-day.

* 7 *

Buckle sailors you’ll se there,
With long sea-boots and close cropped hair.

Related to Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

A Long Time Ago (C)

California

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso