As Off to The South’ard We Go – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the As Off to The South’ard We Go

“As Off to The Southard We Go” is the shanty from the “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906), mentioned by Stan Hugill on the occasion of the description of the “Heave Away Cheerily O!” shanty. I have to mention Stan Hugill’s description that which says the song is the capstan song, but In Ferris & Tozer’s book is in the chapter “Anchor Songs”. So what is the difference? Well, the “capstan songs” is a more general term, due to the capstan can be used in many more sailor works than raise the anchor.

Raising the anchor happens only on the main capstan, and the tempo is quite established. But the term anchor song is ambiguous as well because the anchor can be raised by using the capstan or brake windlass. The song can be sung for both due to the usual timing used for brake-windlass work being 2/4 or 6/8 (same as on the music notation), so I decided to reconstruct this song as the Brake Windlass Shanty.


One more issue is that Stan Hugill suggested that this song was published in the first edition of the Davis & Tozer book, which is not true because I have a copy of this book and in the first set of 24 shanties from the book this shanty not appeared. I cannot confirm that song is on the second edition, but also I have the third edition of the book which contains a set of 50 shanties, and the song appear on page 28 and 29, the third edition has been in print in 1906.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906).
The lyrics: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 309, 310).

The Record of the As Off to The South’ard We Go

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

As Off to The South'ard We Go - Brake Windlass Shanty

The musical notation

As Off to The South'ard We Go - music notation

And the full lyrics

As Off to The South’ard We Go

The wind is free, and we’re bound for sea,
– Heave away cheerily, ho, oh!
The lasses are waving to you and to me,
– As off to the South’ard we go-o,
– As off to the South’ard we go.

– Sing, my lads, cheerily,
– Heave, my lads, cheerily,
– Heave away cheerily, oh, oh!
– For gold that we prize, And sunier skies,
– Away to the South’ard we go.

* 2 *

They’re waving good-bye and with tearful eye,
Sing cheer up, my darling, and wipe your tears dry,

* 3 *

They’re crying “Come back, my dear Tom or dear Jack!
There’s water in front, and no door at the back,

* 4 *

We want sailors bold, who can work for their gold,
And stand a good wetting without catching cold,

* 5 *

The sailor is true to his Sal or his Sue,
As long as he’s able to keep ’em in view,

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

Interesting Facts about the Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

“Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer” – one of the mentioned versions of the “Heave Away Me Johnnies” shanty, in Stan Hugill’s book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” on page 308. The Ferris and Tozer book song is in chapter “Anchor Songs” on pages 8 and 9. Following Davis and Tozer this song will be reconstructed as the anchor capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (1st Edition) – (1886).
The lyrics: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (1st Edition) – (1886).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).

The Record of the Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Were All Bound To Go - Davis And Tozer - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

The full lyrics

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

As I was walking out one day,
Down by the Albert docks,
I saw the charming maids so gay,
A coming down in flocks,


– Heave away, my jolly boys,
– We’re all bound to go.

* 2 *

There was fair Poll and saucy Sue,
And merry laughing May,
And Sal and Ann, and Bessie true,
Dressed out in bunting gay.

* 3 *

They all were there to see a ship
Of note and noble fame,
That was about to make a trip,
The “Bengal” was her name.

* 4 *

The day was fine when she set sail,
The wind was blowing free;
But it had freshened to a gale,
Ere we were fair at sea.

* 5 *

We snugged her down and laid her to,
With reef’d main-topsail set;
“It was no joke,” I say to you,
Our bunks and clothes were wet.

* 6 *

The gale in fury had increased
Ere night was fairly come;
And ev’ry lubber never ceased
To wish himself at home.

* 7 *

It clear’d off fine at break of day,
The sails were set again;
The “Bengal” speed like life away
Across the raging main.

* 8 *

So gaily let your voices ring,
My Johnnies heave away.
We’re bound to go, so better sing
Than pipe your tears away.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

The Ox-eyed Man (Davis & Tozer)

Interesting Facts about The Ox-eyed Man

“The Ox-eyed Man” is a song that comes from Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, p 82) – (1906). Ferris & Tozer’s book was assigned to categories “Songs for pumping the ship out”, which clearly tells us it is a pump shanty.

The source of The Ox-eyed Man

The music: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, p 82) – (1906)
The lyrics: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, p 82) – (1906)
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 269).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Ox-eyed Man - Pump Shanty

The musical notation

The full lyrics

The Ox-eyed Man

The ox-eyed man is the man for me,
He came a – sailing from o’er the sea,
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 2 *

Oh May in the garden a shelling her peas,
And birds singing gaily among the trees,
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 3 *

Oh, May looked up and she saw her fate
In the ox-eyed man passing by the gate
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 4 *

Oh, May in the garden a-shelling her peas,
Smil’d on the stranger who’d come o’er the seas
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 5 *

The ox-eyed man gave a fond look of love,
And charmed May’s heart which was pure as a dove.
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 6 *

Oh, May in the parlour a-sitting on his knee,
And kissing the sailor who’d come o’er the sea.
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 7 *

Oh, May in the garden a shelling her peas,
Now weeps for the sailor who sail’d o’er the seas.
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (A)

The Lowlands Low (C)

So Early In The Morning (C)

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer)

Interesting Facts about The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer)

As Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer mentioned in their book “The Girl With The Blue Dress” was a song for “pumping the ship out”. It has slightly different music than Harding’s version, and I cannot lose the opportunity to reconstruct this song as the pumping shanty, also the text is different than Harding’s Barbadian version.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906)
The lyrics: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906)
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 267).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer) - Pump Shanty

The musical notation

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer) - music notation

The full lyrics

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer)

A girl asleep with a blue dress on,
– SHAKE her, Johnnie, SHAKE her.
An unsafe couch she’s resting on,
– SHAKE her, and so WAKE her.

* 2 *

Storm clouds are gath’ring on our lee,
And soon aback our sail may be,

* 3 *

She may be drenched with salt sea spray.
So go and rouse her quick I say.

* 4 *

White caps are dancing upon the sea,
Run quick, or else to late you’ll be,

* 5 *

She’s lying asleep there on the deck,
No thought of sea, or gale, or wreck.

* 6 *

A girl asleep with a blue dress on,
An unsafe couch she’s resting on,

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (A)

So Early In The Morning (B)

The Lowlands Low (B)

Shallow Brown C

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown C

Shallow Brown A is a usual version of the general family of the shanties called “Shallow Brown”. At the beginning life of this song, it was used as a pump shanty. As the age of sails progressed, in the late days this song was usually sung at halyards. This version comes from Frederick J Davis; Ferris Tozer – Sailors’ songs or “chanties” (3rd Edition) – (1906). On Page 80 we can find the mentioned song. Also worth mentioning is that this song is in chapter “Songs for pumping the ship out”, so
I will reconstruct this song as a pump shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 259).
The lyrics: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis; Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, 1906).

The Record of the Shallow Brown C

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Shallow Brown C - Pump Shanty

The musical notation

Shallow Brown C - music notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown C

Come get my clothes in order,
– Shallow, Shallow Brown!
I’m off across the border.
– Shallow, Shallow Brown!

* 2 *

My ship will sails to-morrow,
I’ll leave you without sorrow.

* 3 *

Once you were like a fairy,
But now are the contrary.

* 4 *

For you are cross and lazy,
And soon would drive me crazy.

* 5 *

The packet sails to-morrow,
I’ll leave you without sorrow.

* 6 *

Come get my clothes in order,
I,m off across the border.

Related to this sea shanty

Shallow Brown A (Sentimental)

Way Stormalong, John

Santiana (A)