Blow Boys Blow (Norwegian)

Interesting Facts about Blow Boys Blow (Norwegian)

Blow Boys Blow (Norwegian) is another shanty with the word “Blow” is fine old tops’l halyard shanty “Blow, Boys, Blow”.
This was a shanty in which the singer often repeated the solo lines, to string out on a long haul. This is the Norwegian language version. Explanation below text says: After G. W. Larsen, National Old Sailors Home – Fredriksvern.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 230).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 230, 231).

The Record of the Blow Boys Blow (Norwegian)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Blow, Boys, Blow (Norwegian)

Paa vaade veie vil vi vandre,
– BLOW, boys, BLOW!
Vi tager avsked med hverandre,
– BLOW, me bully boys, BLOW!

* 2 *

Jeg ser min flamme staar paa pynten,
Hun graeter visst, ti slut er mynten.

* 3 *

Til mersefaldet styrmand kalder,
Og heis nu klyver, til hun falder.

* 4 *

Hun driver rundt–en maned til roret,
Og hiv nu ankret op i sporet!

* 5 *

Hal op i styrbords agterbraser!
Vor styrmand flyr nu rundt og maser,

* 6 *

Fra kysten nu saa fint hun langer,
Der ser vi Okso fyrtaarn pranger.

* 7 *

Snart har vi Lindesnaes isigte–
Nu styrmand maa de peile rigtig!

* 8 *

Det frisker op med bris nordostlig–
Hun slinger praegtig–det er kos’lig.

* 9 *

Kaptein roper: Hei du stuert!
Slipp nu laerken ut av buret!

* 10 *

Skjaenk i en og la os smake,
Et skjont farvel for dem tilbake.

* 11 *

Heis nu seilet hoit paa stangen!
Nu er det oppe–slutt med sangen.

Related to this sea shanty

Roll The Cotton Down (A)

Roll The Cotton Down (B)

Oh Köm un Beer for mi (German)

Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You

Interesting Facts about the Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You

Stan Hugill on page 230 of the “Shanties From The Seven Seas”, mentioned he discovered this version by searching foreign sources. The mentioned book by Stan Hugill is the “Sang Under Segel” of the Sigurd Sternvall. The mentioned song we can find on page 370 of the mentioned source (fortunately this book is a part of my collection of the shanty books). The comments from Sternvall’s book say:
…”The text by sailmaker Gustaf Wiman, Boston, 1909.
“Bully “s have the same as mischievous. In English college slang, it also has this meaning. “Belaying pin’s soup” is in Swedish translation nothing more than a good cooking beat.”…

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935).

The lyrics:  “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935). This reconstruction will contain full text and music notation from Sigurd Sternvall’s book, and also the title is changed from the original.

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 230).

The Record of the Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You - music notation

The full lyrics

Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You

Oh, blow ye winds, I like to hear you,
– BLOW; boys, BLOW!
Blow today and blow tomorrow!
– BLOW, boys! Bully, bully, BLOW, boys, blow!

* 2 *

A Yankee ship came down the river.
Her mast and spars they shine like silver.

* 3 *

How do you know she is a Yankee clipper?
By the stars and stripes she flies behind her.

* 4 *

And who do you think is the master of her?
One-eyed Kelly, the Bowery runner.

* 5 *

And what do you think they will have for dinner?
Belaying pin’s soup and monkeys liver.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Boys Blow (B)

Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

Hourra Mes Boués Hourra! (French)

Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

Interesting Facts about Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

I was collected from page 229 of Stan Hugill’s book printed odd verses (Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)), they have been used, been sung by shantymen on various decks of sailing ships, so I do not see any reason to forget those verses and leave them unused. This is the reason why I cannot omit them, and I will be over the moon to sing them as a halyard shanty way as previous full versions of this shanty from the book.
This was a shanty in which the singer often repeated the solo lines, to string out on a long haul.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 226).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 228, 229).

The Record of the Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

Blow,me boys, an’ blow tergether,
– BLOW, boys, BLOW!
Blow,me boys for better waether.
– BLOW, me bully boys, BLOW!

* 2 *

Blow, boys, blow, the cook’s drawin’ water,
A bob for the cook an’ a cheer for his daughter.

* 3 *

She files aloft the stripes an’ stars,
She has cotton canvas an’ pitchpine spars.

* 4 *

A yankee ship came down the river,
There’s the style to make ye shiver.

* 5 *

Blow, me boys, we’ve come to cheer yer.
Blow, me boys, we’ve come to cheer yer.

* 6 *

Another pull, ho, rock an’ shake ‘er.
For go she must an’ go we’ll make ‘er.

* 7 *

I though I heard the Old Man say
Another pull an’ then belay.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Boys Blow (A)

Up Up My Boys Up A Hill

Blow Boys Blow (C)

Darcy Lever – The Young Sea Officer’s (1819)

Darcy Lever – The Young Sea Officer’s (1819)

It is my great pleasure to present to you this book, it is really a gem for all maritime enthusiasts. To start from the title; the full title of the book is “The Young Sea Officer’s Sheet Anchor: Or a Key to the Leading of Rigging and to Practical Seamanship”. The length of the title is not unusual for the books from this time of history. As we go from the past into nova days time we can observe a shortening of titles; verses in songs, and so on. It seems to be very natural in our current times; to receive just short information to minimize the time cost of gaining knowledge. But this book is not from our time; it is from the past and it gives us a snip of the specific knowledge; displayed in every possible small detail. To read this book is like discovering a user guide; for the complicated steam machines in 21 century containing drawings, explanations, and all necessary knowledge.

The language used in Darcy Lever – The Young Sea Officer’s Sheet Anchor


I asked the question myself: Did you understand everything from this book?, and the answer is “Hell, no”. The reason is the book contains tones of the specific nautical language; a lot of terms from the book are forgotten and not used more than 100 years past; but it doesn’t matter. A great number of pictures and draws give us the opportunity; to match what is described in the book by drawing explanations.

Why this book is so crucial for the shanty singer or shanty enthusiasts?


Well, every time I try to reconstruct some forgotten shanty I have an issue with one thing;, to imagine myself as a part of the gang who heaving or hauling the rope during ship work. And it is not a general issue, I can easily Imagine pulling or pushing activities. It is a huge difference when simple imagination you can fill with imagining where this halyard ends; when you can Imagine a sailor who shouting the yard “All Clear” from the yard; and you know what he did to be prepared for this shout when you know where belaying pins are; and why some old pictures show raise yard by pulling on boart of the ship. This book gives to you this information.

Conclusion


Well, every time I try to recreate some forgotten shanties; I have a problem with one thing: imagine myself being part of the crew; heaving or hauling the rope while working on the ship. And that’s not a general problem, it’s easy to imagine pulling or pushing. But it’s a huge difference; when a simple hazy image from our imagination; turns into a picture where you can imagine where that halyard ends; you can imagine a sailor screaming “All Clear” from the yard; and you know what he did to prepare to that scream when you know; where the belaying pins are and why in some old photos you can see halyard pulling from the side of the ship and not from the base of the mast. This book contains all of this information.

This book describes knots, rigging, and elements of all complicated machinery that operates sails on tall ships. It tells you how reef mainsail happens, how to install topmast on main masts, and tones of other information. If you buy it your shanty singing will be much less virtual, at least in your head, and definitely, you will be closer to discovering the true spirit of the sea shanties.

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to The Young Sea Officer’s

Glyn Davies – Cerddi Huw Puw (1922)

Bjorn Landstrom – The Ship (1961)

Cicely Fox Smith – Sea Songs and Ballads 1917 – 1922 (1930)

Glyn Davies – Cerddi Huw Puw (1922)

Glyn Davies – Cerddi Huw Puw (1922)

Glyn Davies – Cerddi Huw Puw (1922); is one of known by myself books when I could see the shanties and sea songs in the Welsh language. The Welsh language (really unique); used in one of the countries of the land of the United Kingdom; has a very different accent and vocabulary than the English language.

The book is an experiment for an author’s own children; to increase the popularity of the Welsh language by singing in Welsh schools. Speaking of the authenticity of the songs you can find in the collection, the tunes have been taken at random: Old Welsh and Old English melodies. And also shanties and sea songs picked up on Welsh ships, some thirty years before the book was in print; which means around 1890. Some of the tunes were made up by an author, some of them just for an author’s own amusement. Overall book is super unique; I didn’t see any references on other collectors’ books to this one, which can be a good or bad thing.

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to the Cerddi Huw Puw

Joanna Colcord – Songs Of American Sailormen (1938)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v2 (1927)

Joanna Colcord – Songs Of American Sailormen (1938)

Joanna Colcord – Songs Of American Sailormen (1938)

Songs Of American Sailormen (1938) by Joanna Carver Colcord is a cornerstone of American heritage in the subject of shanties. The author herself was born at sea. The father of an author Lincoln Colcord was a captain of a merchant fleet ship for over two decades. The edition from 1938 is an enlarged and revised edition of the book from 1924.
The author of the book “Songs of American Sailormen”; describes a huge amount of shanties not only from the musical point of view; but also from the side of the work for which the described shanties were used. Joanna C Colcord’s book is, next to William Doerflinger’s “Shantymen and Shantyboys” and the works of Frederick Pease Harlow; the most important authentic source of shanties and information on shanties.
An interesting fact for Polish fans of shanties is that Joanna C Colchord’s books; were one of the main source texts of the works of one of the two most popular shanty bands; “Cztery Refy”. According to the story of Simon Spalding; in the 1980s, at the request of Jerzy Rogacki; Simon Spalding, using a photocopier (Xero); copied the work of Joanna C Colcord at the Mystic Seaport Museum; one for Jerzy Rogacki and the other for himself. Jerzy Rogacki received a parcel from “America”, containing a valuable photocopy of this wonderful book.

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to the Songs Of American Sailormen

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v2 (1927)

John Ashton – Real sailor songs (1891)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v2 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v2 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v2 is a collection of twelve shanties; very famous; a good selection that gives us a full range and a selection of rhythms from various types of shanties. However; it is worth noting, according to the author; who says about it in the preface, that the songs have been textually and melodically adapted to the stage; so for people looking for original lyrics; this is not a good place.

As important; it should be mentioned that; in addition to the notation; all songs have chords for the ukulele (in a nice simple form of a neck sketch; with marked places where you should press the strings.

Another note for Polish fans: the book contains the song “Blow, Boys, Blow!” it has a melody almost identical to the beautiful song “Brzegi Congo River”; by Janusz Sikorski (an author of the Polish text); one of the members of the band Stare Dzwony. If you follow the f “My Library” – posts on my Fan Page; you probably have a deja-vu; so the description is the same as in the previous item with the same title, except for the cover, the items differ in that in this edition you will find samples of two songs at the end of the book, which is not in the previous position, so now at least you know that you don’t have to get in both positions.

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to the Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v2

Joanna Colcord – Songs Of American Sailormen (1938)

Glyn Davies – Cerddi Huw Puw (1922)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1 (1927)

R. W. Saar & Gilbert Forsyth – Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1 (1927) is a collection of twelve shanties, very famous, a good selection that gives us a full range and a selection of rhythms from various types of shanties. However, it is worth noting, according to the author, who says about it in the preface, that the songs have been textually and melodically adapted to the stage, so for people looking for original lyrics, this is not a good place.

As important, it should be mentioned that, in addition to the notation, all songs have chords for the ukulele (in a nice simple form of a neck sketch with marked places where you should press the strings. Another note for Polish fans: the book contains the song “Blow, Boys, Blow!” it has a melody almost identical to the beautiful song “Brzegi Congo River” by Janusz Sikorski (an author of the Polish text), one of the members of the band Stare Dzwony.

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to the Twelve Sailors Songs or Chanteys v1

John Ashton – Real sailor songs (1891)

W. G. Whittaker – Blow the wind southerly (1921)

Jim Mageean – Heave Away (2020)

John Ashton – Real sailor songs (1891)

John Ashton – Real sailor songs (1891)

The book is a collection of nautical songs and poems, collected by John Ashton. With two hundred woodcut illustrations throughout. Including sections on Sea Fight, Press-gang, Disaster, Ashore, and Love. Including poems entitled The Battle of Trafalgar, Bold Napier, The Lady’s Love for a Sailor, and many more. This book is a masterpiece for many reasons, the first reason being a collection of songs, which cannot be found anywhere but in this book.

The earliest source of some of the songs.

Another reason is that in this book we find the first or one of the earliest versions of the song “Flash Frigates” which is the original of the beautiful song “La Pique” and later “Dreadnought”, which is especially important for Polish fans of sea songs, because it is the parent of a wonderful song, sung by the group Cztery Refy, of course, we are talking about the song “Lśniąca Fregata”.

The last reason is the amazingly beautiful, its huge size (it is the largest book in my collection!), Woodcut illustrations, and the fact that the same top-quality paper and printing method were used as used for printing broadsides. The whole thing is so spectacular that the cheapest online copy of this book costs £ 220, I highly recommend it. Of course, as always, for those interested in particular songs, just contact me and I am able to provide photos of the song you are looking for.

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to the Real sailor songs

W. G. Whittaker – Blow the wind southerly (1921)

Joanna Colcord – Roll And Go – Songs of American Sailormen (1924)

Frederick J Davis; Ferris Tozer – Sailors’ songs or “chanties” (3rd Edition) – (1906)

W. G. Whittaker – Blow the wind southerly (1921)

Blow The Wind Southerly – Reprinted by W. G. Whittaker (1921).

Here is a single track release “Blow The Wind Southerly” a reprint of this beautiful song from the book “North Countrie Ballads, Songs and Pipe Tunes”, edited and arranged by W. G. Whittaker. I reached this position through Stan Hugill, who mentioned the origins of “The Fishes”. In his book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” on page 197 of the first edition (1961). Stan Hugill says that this is the original from which the shanties of the same title were made.

As we know about it, this song is undoubtedly a song by Scottish fishermen, but the origin is of course much older, Jim Mageean told me that, It’s a Tyneside song from where He living, the first time this song appeared in print in The Bishoprick Garland (Cuthbert Sharp 1834), and the Northumbrian Minstrelsy ( Bruce & Stokoe 1887), then in Songs and Ballads of Northern England (John Stokoe 1892).

Do you want to be more involved?

You can find excellent records of sea shanties here. If you want to discuss this book or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or below post in the comment section.

Related to the Blow The Wind Southerly

Frederick J Davis; Ferris Tozer – Sailors’ songs or “chanties” (3rd Edition) – (1906)

Joanna Colcord – Roll And Go – Songs of American Sailormen (1924)

John Sampson – The Seven Seas Shanty Book (1927)