Johnny Come Down To Hilo

Interesting Facts about The Johnny Come Down To Hilo

“Johnny Come Down To Hilo” shanty was given by many collectors: Sharp, Terry (who even make it popular in schools), and Doerflinger. According to Stan Hugill tune is Irish in origin and the lyrics are a mixture of the Negro catch-phrases, lines from Negro minstrel ditties, and other bits and pieces from other shanties, e.g. “Poor Old Man” or “The gal With the Blue Dress”. The normal environment for “Johnny Come Down To Hilo” was the work at the capstan.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 266).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 266, 267).

The Record of The Johnny Come Down To Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Johnny Come Down To Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Johnny Come Down To Hilo

I niver seed the like, since I bin born,
Ooh, a big buck nigger wid his sea boots on

– Oh, Johnny come down to Hilo,
– (Oh) poor old man!
– Oooh! wake her!
– Oh, shake her!
– Ooooh! wake that gal wid the blue dress on!
– When Johnny comes down to Hilo,
– (Oh) poor old man!

* 2 *

I love a little gal across the sea,
She’s a ‘Badian beauty, an’ she sez to me

Wuz ye never down in Mobile Bay,
A-screwin’ cotton for a dollar a day?

* 3 *

Ooh, there once wuz a nigger an’ his name wuz Uncle Ned,
An’ he had no yarns on the top o’ his head.

* 4 *

Did ye ever see the ol’ plantation boss,
An’ his long-tailed filly, an’ his big, black hoss?

* 5 *

Oh, go fetch me down me riding cane,
For I’m off to see me sweetheart Jane.

* 6 *

Ooh, Sally in the garden, pickin’ peas,
An’ the hair of her head hangin’ down to her knees.

Related to this sea shanty

The Gals O’ Chile

Larry Marr

The Lowlands Low (B)

Mochyn Du

Interesting Facts about the Mochyn Du

Mochyn Du was probably the most popular capstan shanties among Welsh crews, on the ships hailing in the main from Liverpool. This song is a folk song under another name “The Black Pig”. Stan Hugill obtained these lyrics from H. B. Jones. Stan Hugill also states that were many versions of this song but not all of them were sung at sea.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 238).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 238).

The Record of the Mochyn Du

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Mochyn Du - notation

The full lyrics

Mochyn Du

Redodd Dico i Lluyncelyn,
Mofyn Mati at y mochyn,
D’wedodd Matti, O mar arw,
Mochyn-du syd bron a marw,

– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– Y mae yma alar calon,
– Ar ol claddew mochyn; du!

* 2 *

Melws iawn yw cael rhew seliscen,
O gig mochyn gyda thatan,
Ond y awr rhaid gwnaid heb hwnw,
Mochyn-du syd wedi marw.

– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– Y mae yma alar calon,
– Ar ol claddew mochyn
; du!

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (B)

Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations)

Hurrah Hurrah Hurrah!

Blow Ye Winds (B)

Interesting Facts about the Blow Ye Winds (B)

Blow Ye Winds (B), according to stan Hugill was even more popular than version “A” from his book. Joanna Colcord gives us this song as a Forebitter, but another American collector, sailor, and author Frederick Pease Harlow give us as a shanty. This version has been preserved by Stan Hugill from his shipmate — “Taff” Davies of Anglesey — is closely allied to both. It was sung at the capstan and pumps to the same tune as version “A”. Worth noting that Harlow gives us additional two stanzas which are worth singing, so you can find at end of my reconstruction these additional two stanzas.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 219).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 222).

The Record of the Blow Ye Winds (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Blow Ye Winds (B)

Twas on a Sunday mornin’, down ‘cross the Southern Sea,
Our ship she lay at anchor, while awaitin’ for a breeze,

– Singin’ blow, ye winds, in the mornin’,
– Blow, ye winds, high-ho!
– Clear away yer runnin’ gear,
– An’ blow, me bully-boys, blow!

* 2 *

The cap’n he wuz down below, the men at their work about,
When under our bow we heard a splash, an’ then a lusty shout.

* 3 *

‘Man overboard!’ the lookout cried, an’ for’ard we all ran,
A’ hangin’ to our larboard chains wuz a bluff, ol’ green merman.

* 4 *

His hair wuz blue, his eyes wuz green, his mouth wuz big as three,
An’ the long green tail that he sat on wuz wigglin’ in the sea.

* 5 *

‘Hello!’ cried the Mate as bold as brass, ‘What-ho! shipmates,’ cried he.
‘Oh, I want ter speak ter yer Ol’ Man, I’ve a favour to ask, ye see.

* 6 *

‘I,ve bin out all night on a ruddy sea-fight at the bottom of the deep blue sea,
I’ve just come home and find that ye have caused a hell o’ a spree.

* 7 *

‘Oh, ye’ve dropped yer anchor afore me house, an’ blocked me only door,
An’ me wife’s blocked in an’ she can’t git out, nor me babes who number four.’

* 8 *

‘The anchor shall be hove at once, an’ yer wife an’ yer babes set free,
But I never saw a scale from a sprat to a whale till now that could speak to me.

* 9 *

‘Yer figgerhead is a sailor’s bold, an’ ye speak like a human man,
But where did yer git such a ruddy big tail, answer me that if yer can.’

* 10 *

‘A long time ago from ship ‘Hero’ I fell overboard in a gale,
An’ away down below where the seaweeds grow, I meet a gal with a tail.

* 11 *

‘She saved me life, an’ I made her me wife, an’ me legs changed instantly,
An’ I’m married to a sweet merimaid at the bottom of the deep blue sea.

* 12 *

‘So I’ll stay here for the rest o’ me life, with never a worry nor care.
Goodbye to the trade of a sailor bold — my lotwith the fishes I’ll share.

* 13 *

Additional Harlow Verses

* 14 *

And now we’re all loaded and I don’t give a damn,
With anchor weighted and hawser made, we’ll sail for Yankee Land,

* 15 *

We’re bound for New York City, in the good old ship Akbar,
The old man bought the consul out with a barrel of Stockholm tar.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Interesting Facts about the Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

I want to introduce Blow Ye Winds (extra verses). Stan Hugill in his “Shanties From the Seven Seas” gives us three versions of this song, after the description of version A he mention that:
… Many of the verses sung to these refrains were also used by seamen — often in the unprintable form! …
These are those five verses mentioned by Stan Hugill, I think it will be a big loss to not sing these verses, and as far as I am aware, nobody sang these verses but Stan Hugill, or people who he heard them from. To make my theory even stronger I mention fact that verses don’t have a title or an author or any musical notation, so I will reconstruct them using notation from version A of Stan Hugill’s book.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 219).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 219, 220).

The Record of the Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

We have a cock in our barton, will cluck like any hen,
And often to myself I think, why ye are just the sen!

– Singin’ blow, ye winds, in the mornin’,
– Blow, ye winds, high-ho!
– See all clear yer runnun’ gear,
– An’ blow, me bully boys, blow!

* 2 *

We have a flower in our garden which we call Marigold,
And if you will not when you can, you shall not when you will.

* 3 *

As I went out one May morning to view the medows gay,
I met a pretty dairy-maid all in the new mown hay.

* 4 *

As I was ridding out one day I saw some pooks of hay;
Is this not a very pretty place for boys and maids to play?

* 5 *

There was a jolly farmer’s son who kept sheep on a hill,
He sallied forth one summer’s morn to see what he could kill.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow ye winds of morning

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (odd verses collection)

Ved Ankerhioning (Norvegian)

Blow ye winds of morning

Interesting Facts about the Blow ye winds of morning

Blow ye winds of morning, this song mentioned by Stan Hugill – “Shanties from the Seven Seas” (1961) on page 220, comes from Richard Runciman Terry’s “The Shanty Book Part II”. R R Terry has it as a capstan shanty, same give it to us, Stan Hugill in his book. Also intriguingly Terry says it is the only instance of a sea song being sung as a shanty. In the case that this shanty was the only instance of a sea song being sung as a shanty, Stan Hugill however, pointed out examples of sea songs such as “Rolling Home” or “High Barbary”. They were all popular sea-songs that the end of the day finished as a shanty. Terry gives this song as a shanty from the shantyman known as – Mr. Short of Watchet, Somerset.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.

The lyrics:  “The Shanty Book part II” (1926) – Richard Runciman Terry.

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 220).

The Record of the Blow ye winds of morning

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Blow ye winds of morning - music notation

The full lyrics

Blow, ye winds of morning

As I walked out one morning fair
to view the meadows round,
It’s there I spied a maiden fair
come trip-ping o’er the ground.

– O blow, ye winds of morning,
– Blow, ye winds, hi! Ho!
– Clear away the morning dew,
– And blow boys blow.

* 2 *

My father has a milk-white steed
and he is in the stall,
He will not eat his hay or corn,
Nor will not go at all.

* 3 *

When we goes in the farmer’s yard
and sees a flock of geese,
We dang their eyes and cuss their tighs
And knock down five or six.

* 4 *

As I was a walking
Downby the riverside,
It’s there I saw a lady fair
A-bathing in the tide.

* 5 *

As I was a-walking
out by the moonlight,
It’s there I spied a yaller gal,
And her eyes they shone so bright.

* 6 *

As I was a-walking
Down Paradise Street,
It’s there I met old John de Goss,
He said, ‘Will you stand treat?”

Related to this sea shanty

Blow. Ye Winds (A)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (C)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (D)

Blow. Ye Winds (A)

Interesting Facts about the Blow. Ye Winds (A)

It was some controversies related to Blow. Ye Winds (A), Captain Whall says it was a song of the midshipmen’s berth rather than that of the fo’c’sle. Miss Joanne Colcord gives it as a whalers’ song, but R R Terry has it as a capstan shanty, same give it us, Stan Hugill. Also intriguingly Terry says it is the only instance of a sea song being sung as a shanty. In the case that this shanty was the only instance of a sea song being sung as a shanty, Stan Hugill however, pointed out examples of sea songs such as “Rolling Home” or “High Barbary”. They were all popular sea-songs that the end of the day finished as a shanty. Cecil Sharp also gives this song as a shanty probably from the same shantyman as Terry – Mr. Short of Watchet, Somerset.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 219).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 219, 220).

The Record of the Blow. Ye Winds (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Blow. Ye Winds (A) - music notation

The full lyrics

Blow. Ye Winds (A)

As I walked out one morning fair, to view the meadows round,
‘Tis there I spied a pretty lass come trip-pin’o’er the ground,

– Singin’ blow, ye winds, in the mornin’,
– Blow, ye winds, high-ho!
– See all clear yer runnun’ gear,
– An’ blow, me bully boys, blow!

* 2 *

My father has a milk-white steed an’ he is in his stall,
He is a clever circus horse, he can balance on a ball,

* 3 *

When we goes in the farmer’s yard an’ sees a great big duck,
We catch him an’ we wring his neck, if we have any luck.

* 4 *

As I wuz out a-walkin’, close by the riverside,
‘Tis there I spied a naked lass a-swimmin’ in the tide.

* 5 *

Oh, as I wuz out a-walkin’ all in the pale moonlight,
‘Tis there I spied a yaller gal, her eyes they shone so bright.

* 6 *

As I wuz out a-walkin’ down Paradise’s Street,
It’s there I met a flash chowlah, who said, ‘Will ye stand treat?’

* 7 *

She took me arm an’ I took hers an’ off we rolled away,
We steered into the Dewdrop Inn, where I could blow me pay.

Related to this sea shanty

Ane Madam – Trøndelag Version (Norwegian)

Rosabella Fredolin (Swedish)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (A)

Rosabella Fredolin (Swedish)

Interesting Facts about the Rosabella Fredolin

This is the Swedish capstan shanty “Rosabella Fredolin”. Stan Hugill took whole this beautiful shanty from Captain Sigurd Sternvall’s book, “Sang Under Segel” (1935). This is what, Captain Sternwall wrote in his book about this song:
…” A very unusual song, because it can be traced for nearly one hundred years in its different variations. In the form given here, there are differences to those usually found in seamen’s song-books. This is a from Lars Erik Sandin’s song-book, dated 1844… One immediately recognizes the third verse, which deals with the unlucky letters Rosabella uses as hair-curlers. The song is found in a Norwegian version as the hauling song Ane Madam, and also in modern rallar songs.”…

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 217).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 217, 218).

The Record of the Rosabella Fredolin

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Rosabella Fredolin - music notation

The full lyrics

Rosabella Fredolin

En sjömans största nöje är
– Fredolin,
att älska en flieka skönha, ha, ha,
– Fredolin,
Men om hon falsker bevisar sig,
hon ingen ro skall ha för mig,
– Rosabella Fredolin.

* 2 *

Jag reste bort och avasked tog
Och snarlingen hon mig bedrog,

Det synes väl vad hon mig gav,
Som kunde en annans hjärta ta,

* 3 *

Dom breven jag till henne skrev
Hon alla dem i stycken rev
Hon vecklade dem uti sitt har,
Och detta haver gjort mitt hjärta sar.

* 4 *

Och när detta veta fick
Ett avskedsbrev till henne gick
Hon visste väl var hon igen
Nog kunde fa annan vän,

* 5 *

Uppsöka skall hon mig en gang
Fast vantan den blir ganska lang
Hon vet väl att skicka sig,
Ja nogsamt söker hon upp mig,

* 6 *

En repslagardotter är det som
Jag denna visa sjunger om
Hon haller dans och det förmar,
Hon jämt pa golvet med flaskan gar,

* 7 *

Oh henne är det skickat till
Att man ma komma när man vill
Hon har all ting tillagade,
Tobak och pipa far man där

* 8 *

Nu sjunger jag min avskedssang
Och flickio tack för denna gang
Kom sjöman, hall dig munter och käck,
Och drick sedan flickornas griller väck.

Related to this sea shanty

Knock A Man Down

As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway

The Fishes A

Ane Madam – Trøndelag Version (Norwegian)

Interesting Facts about the Ane Madam – Trøndelag Version

Ane Madam – Trøndelag Version, Norwegian shanty that was sung to the tune of “Blow The Man Down”. It was the most popular of all Scandinavian halyard shanties at was sung throughout Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish ships in varied forms. However this, Trøndelag district version was used at the capstan.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 203).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 215, 216).

The Record of the Ane Madam – Trøndelag Version

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Ane Madam (Trøndelag Version)

Se vinden den frisker jo opp i fra nord,
– Aa haa – Ane Madam!
kom skynd dokker gutter vi må om bord
– Aa haa – Ane Madam!

* 2 *

Vør los for lengst kommer er alt ombord
hør nøye hver mann etter losens ord.

* 3 *

Og naar vi har hevet de ankrene ind,
vi seiler ut byfjorden for en god vind.

* 4 *

Så reiste vi råen på høyen mast
hør etter styrmannen roper: Sett fast.

* 5 *

Nei enda så er vi en tomme igjen
nå fór visst den råen til himmelen.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow The Wind Wester. – First Version

Blow The Wind Wester. – Second Version

The Fishes B

The Fishes A

Interesting Facts about The Fishes A

This is a great shanty, sang usually at the capstan and at the pumps “The Fishes”. In this particular version, Stan Hugill learned from an old seaman who sailed in the cooper ore barques of the Bristol Channel, the version will include an alternative starting verse learned from a mentioned seaman. In the book, Stan Hugill gives us only two first stanzas, due to the other ones were taken from the “Blow The Man Down” shanty, so I took another 3 verses from the mentioned shanty, to make this reconstruction a sensible length, and a bit more entertaining.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 198).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 198).

The Record of The Fishes A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Fishes A - music notation

The full lyrics

The Fishes A

Oh, a ship she was rigged, and ready for sea,
And all of her sailors were fishes to be.

– Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow,
– Our ship she’s in full sail,
– Now steady she goes!

* 2 *

First came the herring sain’, ‘I’m King o’ the seas,
He jumped on the poop, ‘Oh, the Capen I’ll be!’

* 3 *

The next was a flat-fish, they call him the skate,
“If you be the captain, why sure, I’m the mate.”

* 4 *

The next came the hake, as black as a rook,
Says he, “I’m no sailor, I’ll ship as the cook.”

* 5 *

The next came the shark, with his two rows of teeth,
“Cook, mind the cabbage and I’ll mind the beef.”

Related to this sea shanty

South Australia (Doerflinger Version)

South Australia – L. A. Smith Version

The Codfish Shanty

As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway

Interesting Facts about As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway

Here is the old forebitter “Ratcliffe Highway”; which was sometimes sung at the pumps and the capstan. This version mentioned by Stan Hugill comes from William Doerflinger’s “Shantymen and Shantyboys” (1951). Doerflinger mention about is that the same stanza words; were sung in the halyard shanty “Blow the Man Down”. Captain Tayluer believed this song; was composed about 1840; by an East India trader.
In Doerflinger’s book, we can find this song in the chapter “Deep-Water Songs”. I will try myself reconstruct by Me as a capstan shanty.
I would also like to thank Artur Pietrzykowski for the wonderful illustration that you can find at the beginning of the record.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).

The lyrics:  “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 201).

The Record of As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway - music notation

The full lyrics

As I Went A-Walking Down Ratcliffe Highway

    *introductory verse*

Now, Come all you young sailors and listen to me,
Sure I’ll tell you a story all about the high sea,
Well it ain’t very short, nor it’s not very long,
It’s of a Flyin’ Fish sailor bound ‘ome from ‘Ong Kong.

– With you fol the did-dle lol did-dy, fol de did-dle lol did-dy,
– fol-the did-dle lol did-dy, hay, hay, hay,
– fol-the did-dle lol did-dy, fol de did-dle lol did-dy,
– fol the did-dle lol did-dy, hood-le dum day!

* 2 *

Now as we went a-walking down Rat’liffe Highway,
Well, a flash-lookin’ packet we chanced for to see,
She was bowling along with the waind blowing free,
And she clewed up her courses and waited for me.

* 3 *

Now, she ‘ad up no flags did she show;
She was round in the counter and bluff in the bow.
Were she did ‘ail from I could not tell,
But I threw out my flipper and we’re both bound to hell!

* 4 *

Now, into a snug little corner, oh soon we did moor,
Just be’ind the little table around the door.
We eat there and drank till we nearly did bust,
Then she let out first with her Irishman’s roar, etc…

* 5 *

I’ll bring you silk dresses and all that I know,
Fine gold rings and stones from the islands, you know.
I’ll bring you home plenty of money to spend,
If you’ll only wait till I do return,

(Final chorus, slower)

Related to this sea shanty

Sacramento – Norvegian English worded version

Heisevise (Norvegian Wergland version)

Bound To California