Seafarers

Interesting Facts about the Haul The Seafarers

“Seafarers” is the capstan shanty that comes from “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935) (1st ed p 367 – 368). Stan Hugill mentioned this song on the occasion of the description of shanties family incorporating girls’ names. The first section of this family, represented by “Away, Susanna” or ” Can’t Ye Dance the Polka” is a popular shanty on both American and British ships. Sternvall comments on this song as: “The most popular sailor song of the turn of the century. A capstan shanty”. Stan Hugill gives us only one stanza of this song so I will use the full nine stanzas song from Sternvall’s book.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of the Haul The Seafarers

The music: “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935) (1st ed p 367 – 368).
The lyrics: “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935 (1st ed p 367 – 368).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 369).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Seafarers - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Seafarers - music notation

The full lyrics

Seafarers

Shanghaied in San Francisco,
we fetched up in Bombay.
They set us afloat in an old Leith-boat,
that steered like a stack of hay.

* 2 *

We have sweltered in the tropics,
when the pitch boiled up on deck,
and we saved our hides, with little besides,
form so ice-cold Northsea wreck.

* 3 *

We know the tracks to Auckland,
and the lights on Sidney Head.
We kept close-hauled, while the leadsman called,
the depths of the channels bed.

* 4 *

We know the quais of Glasgow,
and the loom of the lone azores,
we have found our grub in a salt horse tub,
condemned from Navy stores.

* 5 *

We know the streets of Santos,
and the river at Saigon.
we work have drunk our glass with a Chinese lass
in a houseboat at Canton.

* 6 *

They pay us off in london,
and it’s off for a spell ashore.
And again we ship on a southern trip
in a week or hardly more.

* 7 *

It’s good-bye, sally and sue,
for it’s time to go afloat.
With an aching head and a straw-stuffed bed,
a knife and a oilskin coat.

* 8 *

Sing “Time to leave her, Johnny”,
Sing “Bound for Rio Grand!”
When the tug turns back, we follow her track
for a last long look at land.

* 9 *

Then at last that disappears,
and only the blue is seen,
That will send our bones to “Davy Jones”
and our souls to “Fiddlers Green”.

Related to this sea shanty

Paddy Signs On

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

Haul The Bowline B

Interesting Facts about the Haul The Bowline B

“Haul The Bowline” is the shanty that opens the fourth part of the “Shanties From The Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill. Song also opens the family of the shanties with the word “haul”. Stan Hugill tells us that it is quite possible that this is the most ancient of the shanties, seeing that the bowline was a rope of prime importance in medieval times.
This version, Stan Hugill learned from a Welsh deep-water man, and he says that this song (including this particular version), has been sometimes used at the capstan.
The song will be reconstructed by myself as the capstan shanty.

The source of the Haul The Bowline B

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 356).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 356).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Haul The Bowline B - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Haul The Bowline B - music notation

The full lyrics

Haul The Bowline B

Because she had a fore-top, fore ‘n main t’ bowline,
– Haul on the bowline, the bowline haul,
Because she had a main-top, main ‘n’ mizen t’bowline -,
– Ha-ul on the bowline, the bowline haul,

– Haul on the bowline, Oh Kitty you’re me darlin’ -,
– Haul on the bowline, the bowline haul,

Related to this sea shanty

Paddy Signs On

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

Good Mornin Ladies All A

Interesting Facts about the Good Mornin Ladies All A

“Good Mornin Ladies All A” capstan shanty, is the song with the line “Good Mornin Ladies All” which gives us the notion that the song is the negro origin. Cecil Sharp believes it to have some affinity with “Heave Away, Me Johnnies”. This version Stan Hugill took from Tobago Smith, a West Indian shantyman.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of the Good Mornin Ladies All A

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 350).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 350).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Good Mornin Ladies All A - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Good Mornin Ladies All A - music notation

The full lyrics

Good Mornin Ladies All A

Our ol’ man said to me one day,
– High-ee-yo – ho-ho, High-ee-yo – ho-ho – ho-ho!
Let’s git aboard of our packet ship, an’ we’ll roll’er ‘crosst the Bay – ,
– Ah – ha – ! me yellar gals,
– Good mornin’ ladies all!

* 2 *

Oh, fare-ye-well, I wish ye well,
We’re outward bound on the mornin’ tide, this packet wuz bound ter hell.

* 3 *

We sailed away to the White Man’s Grave,
The Yaller Jack it wiped us out, the divil a man wuz saved.

* 4 *

We shipped some monkeys for the crew,
Our bosun wuz a great big ape, the ‘sails’ a kinkajou.

Related to this sea shanty

Paddy Signs On

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

Roller Bowler – Liverpool Version

Interesting Facts about the Roller Bowler – Liverpool Version

“Roller Bowler – Liverpool Version”, the capstan shanty, that Stan Hugill counts as the family of the shanties uses the expression “high-rig-a-jig”. According to an author of the “Shanties From The Seven Seas”, is definitely Negro-Irish type of sailor work-song. Shanty that was sung aboard the West Indian Sugar and Rum Traders, Stan Hugill tells us this version is sung to him by an ancient mariner from Bootle.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of the Roller Bowler – Liverpool Version

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 348).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 348, 349).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Roller Bowler (Liverpool Version) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Roller Bowler - Liverpool Version - music notation

The full lyrics

Roller Bowler – Liverpool Version

Oh, I met her once in Liverpool,
– Hooraw, you roller bowler!
Oh, I met her once in Liverpool,
This saucy gal of mine,
– Timme high-rig-a-jig an’ a ha-ha!
– Good mornin’, ladies all.

– Hooraw, you roller bowler,
– Timme high-rig-a-jig an’ a ha-ha!
– Good mornin’, ladies all.

* 2 *

Oh, the first time that I saw her,
Oh, the first time that I saw her,
‘Twas down in Parkee Lane.

* 3 *

She winked and tipped her flipper,
She-winked and tipped her flipper,
She tought I wuz a Mate.

* 4 *

But when she found that I wuz skint,
But when she found that I wuz skint,
She left me standing there.

* 5 *

She left me there in Parkee Lane,
She left me there in Parkee Lane,
An’ I went back on board.

Related to this sea shanty

Paddy Lay Back

Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo

Paddy Mustert An

Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

Interesting Facts about the Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

“Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version”, the capstan shanty, that Stan Hugill counts as the family of the shanties uses the expression “high-rig-a-jig”. According to an author of the “Shanties From The Seven Seas”, is definitely Negro-Irish type of sailor work-song. Shanty that was sung aboard the West Indian Sugar and Rum Traders, Stan Hugill picket this version out of the Trinidad.
This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of the Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 348).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 348).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Roller Bowler (Trinidad Version) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Roller Bowler - Trinidad Version - musical notation

The full lyrics

Roller Bowler – Trinidad Version

As I rolled out one mornin,
– Hooraw, you roller bowler!
As I rolled out one mornin,
I met a dou-dou fair,
– Timme high-rig-a-jig an’ a ha-ha!
– Good mornin’, ladies all.

– Hooraw, you roller bowler,
– Timme high-rig-a-jig an’ a ha-ha!
– Good mornin’, ladies all.

* 2 *

I axed her for to come wid me,
I axed her for to come wid me,
A-down the Bristol Docks,

* 3 *

She le-eft me and she ran away,
Shee left me and she ran away,
She didn’t like me jib.

* 4 *

I squared me yards an’ sailed away,
I squared me yards an’ sailed away,
An’ to the pub I went.

Related to this sea shanty

Paddy Lay Back

Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo

Paddy Mustert An

Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo

Interesting Facts about the Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo

“Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo” version was given to Stan Hugill by Harding Barbadian, who said it was sung at the capstan. Cecil Sharp gives one verse of this song, and he believes this is the variant of the Irish Folk Song “Shule Agra”. The word “too-rer-loo” in the chorus indicates an Irish connection. This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 340).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 340).

The Record of the Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo - music notation

The full lyrics

Old Moke Pickin On The Banjo

He bang, she bang, daddy shot a bear,
Shot it in the stem me boys, an’ niver turned a hair,

– We’re all from the railroad — too-rer-loo,
– Oh, the ol’ moke pickin’ on the banjo.


– Hooraw! What the hell’s the row?
– We’re all from the railroad — too-rer-loo,
– We’re all from the railroad — too-rer-loo,
– oooh! The ol’ moke pickin’ on the banjo!

* 2 *

Pat, get back, take in yer slack, heave away, me boys,
Heave away, me bully boys, why don’t ye make some noise?

* 3 *

Roll her, boys, bowl her, boys, give ‘er flamin’ gip,
Drag the anchor off the mud, an’ let the bastard rip!

* 4 *

Rock-a-block, chock-a-block, heave the caps’n round,
Fish the flamin’ anchor up, for we are outward bound.

* 5 *

Out chocks, two blocks, heave away or bust,
Bend yer backs, me bully boys, kick up some flamin’ dust.

* 6 *

Whisky-o, Johnny-O, the mudhook is a slight,
‘Tis a hell-ov-a-way to the gals that wait, an’ the ol’ Nantucket Light.

Related to this sea shanty

Sacramento (D)

Banks Of Sacramento – Patterson Capstan version

Sacramento – Version from German barque Gustav

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

“Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland” version, known also under the title “Mainsail Haul”. This song was both capstan shanty and forebitter. According to Stan Hugill, the “Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland” version was very popular, especially in Liverpool ships. Stan Hugill tells us also that this song has two forms, the eight-line verse (forebitter form), and the four-line verse (shanty pattern). We do have here the last variation of this song gives us a capstan shanty from “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951). So, Dick Maitland was the singer who sang this great song to Doerflinger. His performances are very authentic because he was a regular American shantyman, late of Sailors, Snug Harbour.

The following song will be reconstructed as a Capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 326).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 326, 327).

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Paddy Get Back (Dick Maitland) - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Paddy Get Back - Dick Maitland - music notation

The full lyrics

Paddy Get Back – Dick Maitland

I was broke and out of a job in the city of London,
I went down the Shad wall Docks to get a ship,

– Paddy get back,
– take in the slack,
– Heave away your capstan, heave a pawl, heave a pawl!
– ‘Bount ship and stations, there, be handy
– Rise tacks ‘n’ sheets ‘n’ mains’l haul!

* 2 *

There was a Yankee ship a-laying in the basin;
Shipping master told me she was going to New York!

* 3 *

If ever I get my hands on that shipping master,
I will murder him if it’s the last thing that I do!

* 4 *

When the pilot left the ship the catain told us,
We were bound around Cape Horn to Callao!

* 5 *

And he said that she was hot and still a-heating,
And the best thing we could do was watch our step.

* 6 *

Now the mate and second mate belonged to Boston,
And the captain belonged in Bangor down in Maine.

* 7 *

Tree of them were rough an’ tumble fighters,
When not fighting among themselves they fought with us.

* 8 *

Oh, they called us out one night to reef the tops’ls,
There was belayin’-pins a-flyin’ round the deck.

* 9 *

We came on deck and went to set the tops’ls,
Not a man among the bunch could sing a song.

* 10 *

Oh, the mate he grabbed a-hold of me by the collar,
‘If you don’t sing a song I’ll break your blasted neck!’

11 *

I got up and gave them a verse of Reuben Ranzo,
Oh, the answer that I got would make you sick.

12 *

It was three long months before we got to Callao,
And the ship she was a-called a floating hell.

13 *

We filled up there at Callao with saltpetre,
And then back again around Cape Horn!

Related to this sea shanty

Bound for the Rio Grande (Cecil Sharp Version)

Rio Grande (B)

A Long Time Ago (C)

Paddy Mustert An

Interesting Facts about the Paddy Mustert An

“Paddy Mustert An” is the German version of the “Mainsail Haul” or “Paddy Lay, Back” song, in some versions used as forebitter or sea song, and in other cases sung as the capstan shanty. This time the song was used as the capstan shanty. Here is the original song with the melody from “Knurrhahn – Seemannslieder und Shanties”. This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

Special thanks to Gunnar Wiegand who help me with the German language pronunciation of this beautiful song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Knurrhahn – Seemannslieder und Shanties” Richard Baltzer; Klaus Prigge; Knurrhahn-Lotsen-Gesangverein (1936) (Zweiter Band, page 78, 79, and 80).
The lyrics: “Knurrhahn – Seemannslieder und Shanties” Richard Baltzer; Klaus Prigge; Knurrhahn-Lotsen-Gesangverein (1936) (Zweiter Band, page 78, 79, and 80).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 324).

The Record of the Paddy Mustert An

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Paddy Mustert An - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Paddy Mustert An - music notation one

Paddy Mustert An - music notation two

And the full lyrics

Paddy Mustert An

Ein kalter frost’ ger Morgen im Dezember
Und all mein Geld, zum Deubel ging es hin.
Wo dies geschah, ich nicht mehr so erinner’.
Zum Heu’rbüro ich dann hinunterging

An jenem Tag man fragte viel nach Sailors
für Frisco, Santos, Hongkong und fürs Kap
Jch ging jedoch auf einen Whaler
und holte mir sofort das Handgeld ab.

– Paddy gah los! Hal in de Los’!
– Dreih doch rüm dat Gangspill hiev een Pall, hiev een Pall,
– Los as he geiht! Up Station, Jungs! In ‘ne Gang!
– Hal Gei! Schoot un Grootmarsfall!

* 2 *

Am nächsten Morgen kam ich dann zum Schiffe,
Jch fühlt es noch verdammt schwer auf der Brust.
Und setzt im Foksel mich auf meine Kiste
Und törnte ein zu einen kleinen Mulch.

Gerade jetzt hört ich ‘ne Stimme schreien,
Jch horchte, – da vernahm ich sie nochmal.
Es war der Maat mit seinem Preien:
Hört, Jungs, mal her, nun ruf ich eure Nam’n.

* 3 *

Als ich nun ankam auf dem Achterdecke,
So etwas sah mein Auge nie vorher,
Da gab es Menschen jeder Farb’ und Rasse,
Mein armes Herz das wurde krank und schwer.

Jch wünschte mich zurück nach “Jolly sailors”,
Een Pott mit Bier, ne sööte Deern in Arm.
Bei dem Gedanken wollt mein Herz mir brechen,
Jch ging nach vorn, zu stillen meinen Gram.

* 4 *

Jn meiner Kiste hatt ich eine Flasche,
Zum Abscheid gab der Schlafbaas sie mir mit.
Jch dacht’ mit Schnaps zu netzen meine Kehle,
Und damit werden Sorg und Plagen quitt.

Zum Teufel auch! Jch denk mich laust der Affe,
Als ich die Buddel setzte an und trank,
Jch war erstaunt und ganz verdattert
Als “Hustensaft” ich in der Buddel fand.

Related to this sea shanty

Were All Bound To Go – Sampson

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

Heave Away – Colcord

Paddy Signs On

Interesting Facts about the Paddy Signs On

“Paddy Signs On”, as Stan Hugill mentioned, comes from “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935) (1st ed p 372, 373). As Sternvall says his version of the song is the capstan shanty (gångspelsshanty). According to Sternvall, the text recorded by sea captain A. M. Säfström on board the bark ship “Trio” of Tvedestrand in 1913. Sung by captain N. A. Knafe. In this somewhat altered and polished form, it is known from the 1890s. This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935) (1st ed p 372, 373).
The lyrics: “Sang Under Segel” by Sigurd Sternvall (1935 (1st ed p 372 – 374).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 324).

The Record of the Paddy Signs On

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Paddy Signs On - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

Paddy Signs On - music notation part 1
Paddy Signs On - music notation part 2

And the full lyrics

Paddy Signs On

A cold and frosty morning of December,
when all of my money I had spent,
where it went to, now I don’t remember –
I down to a shippingoffice went.

That day there was a great demand for sailors
for Frisco and for London and for France,
so I shipped aboard of a whaler
and went off to cash my advance.

– Paddy, lay back,
– take in your slack,
– rally around the capstan!
– Heave a pawl, heave a pawl!
– Ready about your stations, boys, be handy,
– raise tacks, sheets and mainsail haul!

* 2 *

Next morning I came aboard the vessel,
afeeling very heavy on the booze.
I sat upon my chest aquitely thinking,
I turned in my bunk to have a snooze.

Just then I thought I heard a voice calling.
I listened and I heard it again.
It was the mate, a louding hauling:
“Say boys, answer to your names!”

Related to this sea shanty

Were All Bound To Go – Sampson

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

Heave Away – Colcord

Paddy Lay Back

Interesting Facts about the Yeo Heave Ho!

“Paddy Lay Back”, also called “Mainsail Haul”, was both capstan shanty and forebitter, according to Stan Hugill very popular, especially in Liverpool ships. Stan Hugill knows this song directly from two people, his father and John Connolly (Liverpool-Irish sailing-ship man), whose last line sang in fashion you can find in the lyrics. Stan Hugill tells us also that this song has two forms, the eight-line verse (forebitter form), and four-line verse (shanty pattern). This song will be reconstructed as the capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 321).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 321 – 323).

The Record of the Yeo Heave Ho!

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

Paddy, Lay Back - Capstan Shanty

The musical notation

And the full lyrics

Paddy, Lay Back

Twas a cold an’ dreary mornin’ in December, (December),
An’ all of me money it wuz spent, (it wuz spent)
Where it went to Lord I can’t remember, (remember),
So down to the shippin’ of fice went, (went, went),

– Paddy, lay Back (Paddy, lay Back)!
– Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
– Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl – heave a pawl!
– ‘Bount ship, stations, boys, be handy (be handy)!
– For we’re bound for Valaparaiser ’round the Horn!

* 2 *

That day there wuz a great demand for sailors (for sailors),
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France (an’ for France),
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque the Hotspur (Hotspur),
An’ got paralitic drunk on my advance (‘vance, ‘vance),

* 3 *

Now I joined her on a cold December mornin’,
A-frappin’ o’ me flippers to keep me warm.
With the south cone a-hoisted as a warnin’,
To stand by comin’ o’ a storm.

* 4 *

Now some of out fellers had bin drinkin’,
An’ I mmeself wuz heavy on the booze;
An’ I wuz on me ol’ sea-chest a-thinkin’
I’d turn into me bunk an’ have a snooze.

* 5 *

I woke up in the mornin’ sick an’ sore,
An’ knew I wuz outward bound again;
When I heard a voice a-bawlin’ at the door,
‘Lay aft, men, an’ answer to yer names!’

* 6 *

‘Twas on the quarterdeck where first I saw ’em,
Such an ugly bunch I’d niver seen afore;
For there wuz a bum an’ stiff from every quarter,
An’ it made me poor ol’ heart fell sick an’ sore.

* 7 *

There wuz Spaniards an’ Dutchmen an ‘Roosians,
An’ Johnny Crappos jist across from France;
An’ most o’ ’em couldn’t speak a word o’ English,
But answered to the name of ‘Minth’s Advance’.

* 8 *

I wist I wuz in the ‘Jolly Sailor’,
Along with Irish Kate a-drinkin’ beer;
An’ then I thought what jolly chaps were sailors,
An’ with me flipper I wiped away a tear.

* 9 *

I knew in me box I had a bottle,
By the boardin’-master ’twas put there;
An’ I wanted something for to wet me throttle,
Somethin’ for to drive away dull care.

* 10 *

So down upon me knees I went like thunder,
Put me hand into the bottom o’ the box,
An, what wuz me great surprise an’ wonder’
Found only a bottle o’ medicine for the pox.

* 11 *

I felt that I should skip an’ join another,
‘Twas plain that I had joined a lousy bitch;
But the chances wuz that I might join a worser,
An, we might git through the voyage without a hitch.

* 12 *

I axed the mate a-which a-watch wuz mine-O,
Sez he, ‘I’ll soon pick out a-which is which’;
An’ he blowed me down an’ kicked me hard a-stern-O,
Callin’ me a lousy, dirty son-o’-a-bitch.

* 13 *

Now we singled upan’ got the tugs alongside,
They towed us through the locks an’ out to sea;
With half the crew a-pukin’ o’er the ship’s side,
An’ the bloody fun that started sickened me.

* 14 *

Although me poor ol’ head wuz all a-jumpin’,
We had to loose her rags the followin’ morn;
I dreamt the boardin’-master I wuz thumpin’,
When I found out he’d sent me around the Horn.

* 15 *

I swore I would become a beachie-comber,
An, niver go to sea no ruddy more;
For niver did I want to be a roamer,
I’d shanghai the boardin’-master an’ stay ashore.

* 16 *

But when we got to bully ol’ Vallapariser,
In the Bay we dropped our mudhook far from shore;
The Ol’ Man he refused ter let us raise ‘er,
An’ he stopped the boardin’-master comin’ aboard.

* 17 *

I quickly made me mind up that I’d jump ‘er,
I’d leave the beggar an’ git a job ashore;
I swum across the Bay an’ left ‘er,
An’ in the English Bar I found a whore.

* 18 *

But Jimmy Wop he knew a thing or two, boys,
An, soon he’d shipped me outward bound again;
On a Limey to the Chinchas for guanner, boys,
An’ soon wuz I a-roarin’ this refrain.

* 19*

So there wuz I once more again at sea, boys,
The same ol’ ruddy business over again;
Oh, stamp the caps’n tound an’ make some noise, boys,
An’ sing again this dear ol’ sweet refrain.

Related to this sea shanty

Off To The Southard Well Go

Yeo Heave Ho!

Yo Heave Ho! – Smith