Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

Interesting Facts about the Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

“Rise Me Up From Down Below”, stamp-‘n’-go shanty. Doerflinger took this song from “Lemon” Curtis, and says it is one of his favored songs. Negro origin shanty which combined the functions of a regular halyard shanty and a “walk away (stamp-‘n’-go)” song. In hoisting topgallants to this shanty, the men would first take two “drags” on the rope and then “walk away” with it. The pulls came on “WHISKEY Oh, JOHNny Oh,” while the rest of the chorus was sung as the men stamped along the deck gripping the halyard.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
The lyrics: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 281, 282).

The Record of the Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Rise Me Up From Down Below - Doerflinger - music notation

The full lyrics

Rise Me Up From Down Below – Doerflinger

Oh, I come from the world below.
That is where the cocks do crow.

– Whisky O, Johnny O!
– Oh, Rise me up from down below,
– Down below, Oh Oh Oh Oh!
– Up aloft this yard must go, John.
– Rise me up from down below.

* 2 *

I come from the world below!
That is where the fires do roar.

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot (Stamp-n-go)

Rise Me Up From Down Below

Interesting Facts about the Rise Me Up From Down Below

Here is another great stamp-‘n’-go shanty, “Rise Me Up From Down Below”. According to Harding Barbarian, Stan Hugill’s shipmate this song was very popular on Yankee ships with Coloured crews. Harding also said that the tune is the Jamaican work song taken to sea by West Indian seamen and modify it to their needs.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 281).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 281).

The Record of the Rise Me Up From Down Below

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Rise Me Up From Down Below - music notation

The full lyrics

Rise Me Up From Down Below

I’m just up from the world below,
That is where the cocks do crow,

– Whisky O, Johnny O!
– Rise me up from down below,
– Down below, Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh!
– Rise me up from down below, boys
– Rise me up from down below!

* 2 *

I an the ghost of the Bertie Binns,
Cut down wuz I for me ‘orrible sins.

* 3 *

Me only home is down below,
They’ve let me out for an hour or so.

* 4 *

An’ when the cocks begin to crow,
‘Tis time for me to roll ‘n’ go.

* 5 *

Back in a hurry to the southern shore,
That is where the fires do roar.

* 6 *

I’ll tell yuh, boys ’tis hot in hell,
An’ I should know the place damn well.

* 7 *

An’ now the bleedin’ sail is set,
Back to me hole I’ll have ter get.

Related to this sea shanty

Drunken Sailor (A)

Donkey Riding

Roll The Old Chariot (Stamp-n-go)

Whisky Johnny D

Interesting Facts about the Whisky Johnny D

The “Whisky Johnny D” is a halyard one, usually used at either t’gallant or tops’l halyards, and from time to time it even was used at the capstan.
Here is the list of versions given to us by Stan Hugill:
(a) The advantages and disadvantages of whisky drinking,
(b) Shanghaiing version,
(c) The limejuice skipper, and
(d) Crabfish, crayfish, or lobster version.
This song will be reconstructed as the Halyard shanty. Some collectors claim that this song is very antique, and is dating back to Elizabethanian times.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 274).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 277).

The Record of the Whisky Johnny D

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Whisky Johnny D - music notation

The full lyrics

Whisky Johnny D

‘Mornin’, Mister Fisherman’; ‘Good mornin’, ‘sez he,
– Whisky Johnny!
‘Have ye got a crabfish ye can sell to me?’
Whisky for my Johnny!

* 2 *

‘Oh, yes,’ sez he, ‘I have got two,
One for me an’ the other for you.’

* 3 *

I took the crabfish home, but I couldn’t find a plate.
I put it in the place where me Missus always ate.

* 4 *

Early next mornin’ as ye may guess,
The Missus got up for an early breakfast.

* 5 *

The Missus gave a howl, a groan, and a shout,
She danced around the room with the crabfish on her snout.

* 6 *

I grabbed a scrubber, the Missus grabbed a broom,
We chased the bloomin’ crayfish round an’ round the room.

* 7 *

We hit it on the head, we hit it on the side,
We hit the bloomin’ crabfish, until the blighter died.

* 8 *

The end of my story – the moral is this,
Always put yer spacs on before ye eat yer fish.

Related to this sea shanty

Whisky Johnny B

The Gal With The Blue Dress

Whisky Johnny A

Whisky Johnny C

Interesting Facts about the Whisky Johnny C

The “Whisky Johnny C” is a halyard one, usually used at either t’gallant or tops’l halyards, and from time to time it even was used at the capstan. An interesting fact about this beautiful shanty was that sailors used this shanty, at the mizen tops’l halyards – the hands in the case being strung out across the poop, the idea was to give the captain a gentle hint from the very nature of the words sung to issue a tot of rum.
Here is the list of versions given to us by Stan Hugill:
(a) The advantages and disadvantages of whisky drinking,
(b) Shanghaiing version,
(c) The limejuice skipper, and
(d) Crabfish, crayfish, or lobster version.
The text for this version Stan Hugill took from Mr. Jimmy Sexton, Arthur Spencer, and other seamen. This song will be reconstructed as the Halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 274).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 277).

The Record of the Whisky Johnny C

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Whisky Johnny C - music notation

The full lyrics

Whisky Johnny C

There wuz a limejuice skipper of the name of Hogg,
– Whisky Johnny!
Once tried to stop his sailor’s grog,
– Whisky for my Johnny!

* 2 *

Which made the crew so weak an’ slack,
That the helmsman caught her flat aback.

* 3 *

An’ ever after so they say,
That crew grog three times a day.

* 4 *

So we’ll boost her up an’ bowl along,
An’ dring that skipper’s health in song.

* 5 *

We’ll keep closehauled without a breach,
With just a shiver in the weather leach.

* 6 *

Now if this ship wuz the ol’ James Baines,
That yard would never be lowered again.

* 7 *

The halyards they would racked be,
We’ll drive along through a big green sea.

* 8 *

Oh, hoist the yard from down below,
To the sheave-hole she must go.

* 9 *

Up aloft with taunted leach,
Hand over hand, lads, ye must reach.

* 10 *

Whisky made the Ol’ Man say,
One more pull, lads, than belay!

Related to this sea shanty

Whisky Johnny B

The Gal With The Blue Dress

Whisky Johnny A

Whisky Johnny B

Interesting Facts about the Whisky Johnny B

The “Whisky Johnny B” is a halyard one, usually used at either t’gallant or tops’l halyards, and from time to time it even was used at the capstan. Clark in his book “Seven Years of a Sailor’s Life (1867), refers to the singing of Whisky Johnny at the windlass.
Here is the list of versions given to us by Stan Hugill:
(a) The advantages and disadvantages of whisky drinking,
(b) Shanghaiing version,
(c) The limejuice skipper, and
(d) Crabfish, crayfish, or lobster version.
The text for this version Stan Hugill took from Mr. Jimmy Sexton, Arthur Spencer, and other seamen. This song will be reconstructed as the Halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 274).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 276, 277).

The Record of the Whisky Johnny B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Whisky Johnny B - music notation

The full lyrics

Whisky Johnny B

Now if ever go to ‘Frisco town,
– Whisky Johnny!
Mind ye steer clear o’ Shanghai Brown,
– Whisky for my Johnny!

* 2 *

He’ll dope yer whishy night an’ morn,
An’ then shanghai ye round Cape Horn.

* 3 *

Two months’ wages are dead,
An’ a donkey’s breakfast for yes bed.

* 4 *

Ol’ Shanghai Brown an’ Larry Marr,
Their names are known both near an’ far.

* 5 *

Ol’ Larry Marr an’ Shanghai Brown,
They robbedme up an’ robbed me down.

* 6 *

They fit ye out wid bumboat gear,
That’s got ter last yer ‘alf-a-year,

* 7 *

Carpet slippers made o’ felt,
An’ a nice, clean rope-yarn for a belt.

* 8 *

A suit o’ oilskins made o’ cotton,
An’ ol’ sea-chest wid bricks in the bottom.

* 9 *

Oh, the Barbary Coast is no place for me,
Ye have one drink then wake up at sea.

* 10 *

Ol’ Shanghai Brown he loves us sailors,
Oh, yes he does like hell ‘n’ blazes.

* 11 *

All ye young sailors take a warnin’ from me,
Keep an eye on yer drink, lads, when ye come from sea.

12 *

Or else ye’ll awake on a cold frosty morn,
On a three-skys’l yarder bound round the Horn.

13 *

On a skys’l yarder all bound round the Horn,
Ye’ll wish ter hell that ye’d niver bin born.

14 *

Oh, I thought I heard the Ol’ Man say,
Just one more pull, lads, then belay!

Related to this sea shanty

Walk Me Along Johnny

The Gal With The Blue Dress

Hilo Boys Hilo

Whisky Johnny A

Interesting Facts about the Whisky Johnny A

The “Whisky Johnny A” is the first shanty that opens the family of the shanties with the name Johnny, in its lyrics. This shanty is a halyard one, usually used at either t’gallant or tops’l halyards, and from time to time it even was used at the capstan.
Here is the list of versions given to us by Stan Hugill:
(a) The advantages and disadvantages of whisky drinking,
(b) Shanghaiing version,
(c) The limejuice skipper, and
(d) Crabfish, crayfish, or lobster version.
The text for this version Stan Hugill took from Mr. Butcher. This song will be reconstructed as the Halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 274).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 274, 275, 276).

The Record of the Whisky Johnny A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Whisky Johnny A - music notation

The full lyrics

Whisky Johnny A

Ooh, whisky is the life of man
– Whisky Johnny!
Ooh, whisky from an old tin can,
– Whisky for my Johnny!

* 2 *

Whisky here, whisky there,
Oooo! whisky almast everywhre,

* 3 *

Whisky up an’ whisky down,
Oooh! whisky all around the town.

* 4 *

I’ll drink it hot, I’ll drink it cold,
I’ll drink it new, I’ll drink it old.

* 5 *

Whisky made me sell me coat,
Whisky’s what keeps me afloat.

* 6 *

Whisky fills a man with care,
Whisky makes a man a bear.

* 7 *

Whisky gave me many a sigh,
But I’ll swing whisky till I die.

* 8 *

Whisky made me mammy cry,
Whisky closed me stabbud eye.

* 9 *

Whisky killed me poor ol’ Dad,
Whisky druv me mother mad.

* 10 *

Whisky made me pawn me cloes,
Whisky gave me a broken nose.

* 11 *

Whisky made me shun the booze,
Put me in the calabooze.

12 *

Whisky gave me a big, fat head,
But I’ll drink whisky till I’m dead.

13 *

If I can’t have whisky, then I’ll have rum,
That’s the stuff to make good fun.

14 *

Whisky killed me Sister Sue,
Whisky killed me brother too.

15 *

I had a sister an’ her name wuz Lize,
She puts whisky in her tea.

16 *

My wife an’ I could never agree,
She’d put whisky in her tea.

17 *

Some likes whisky, some likes beer,
I wisht I had a barrel here.

18 *

Oh, the mate likes whisky an’ the skipper likes rum,
The sailors like both but we can’t git none.

19 *

Oh, a tot of whisky for each man,
An’ a bloody big bottle for the shantyman.

20 *

If whisky wuz a river an’ I could swim,
I’d say here goes an’ I’d dive right in.

21 *

If whisky wuz a river an’ I wuz a duck,
I’d dive to the bottom an’ never come up.

22 *

I wist I knew where whisky grew,
I’d eat the leaves an’ the branches too.

23 *

The Divil came from the worl’ below,
That is where bad whisky do grow.

24 *

Oh, whisky straight an’ whisky strong,
Gimme some whisky an’ I’ll sing ye a song.

25 *

If whisky comes too near me nose,
I tip it up an’ down the hatch she goes.

26 *

Here comes the cook with the whisky-can,
A glass o’ grog for every man.

27 *

Whisky made me scratch me toes,
Whisky makes me fight me foes.

28 *

I say Ol’ Man it is a sin,
To make us work widout any gin.

29 *

Whisky made the bosun call,
Hang over hand, lads, ye must reach.

30 *

Whisky made the Ol’ Man say,
One more pull, lads, than belay!

Related to this sea shanty

Walk Me Along Johnny

The Gal With The Blue Dress

Hilo Boys Hilo

John Dameray (Harding)

Interesting Facts about the John Dameray (Harding)

This shanty is known as “Johnny, Come Down the Backstay” or “John Dameray”. Stan Hugill claims it was a stamp-‘n’-go shanty, and a favorite in Yankee ships according to his shipmate Harding Barbadian, the Barbarian. This song was sung at the braces.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 273).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 273).

The Record of the John Dameray (Harding)

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

John Dameray (Harding) - music description

The full lyrics

John Dameray (Harding)

Around Cape Horn we go – o,
– Johnny, come-down the backstay,
Trough wind an’ rain an’ snow – o,
Johnny, come-down the backstay,

– Johny, come down the backstay, John Damaray-ay
Johnny, come down the backstay, John Damaray-ay,
Johny, come down the backstay, John Damaray-ay,

* 2 *

Hoist her from down below,
Through wind an’ rain an’ sno-ow,

* 3 *

Oh, shake her as she ro-olls,
For John’s a bully so-oul.

* 4 *

“Tis time now for our smoko,
The Ol’ Man he’s gone loco.

* 5 *

When I gits me feet ashore,
From sea I won’t go mo-ore.

* 6 *

From sea I will steer cle-ear,
An’ stick to drinkin’ beer.

Related to this sea shanty

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Young Girls Cant You Hilo? (short drag)

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Interesting Facts about the John Dameray (Silsbee)

This shanty is known as “Johnny, Come Down the Backstay” or “John Dameray”. Stan Hugill claims it was a stamp-‘n’-go shanty, and a favorite in Yankee ships according to his shipmate Harding Barbadian, the Barbarian. This particular version comes from William Main Doerflinger in his “Shantymen And Shantyboys” (1951). William Doerflinger mentioned this song was sung at the braces, on American vessels, according to a manuscript by the late Nathaniel Silsbee of Cohasset, Massachusetts. Mr. Silsbee learned this shanty at sea in the 1880s and set down the words in 1893. Song refers to the sailor stunt of sliding down the backstays – a quick way of getting on deck from high aloft.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
The lyrics: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 272).

The Record of the John Dameray (Silsbee)

My reconstruction will imitate “stamp-n-go” shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

John Dameray (Silsbee) - music notation

The full lyrics

John Dameray (Silsbee)

Aloft we all must go-oh,
– John come down the backstay,
In hail and frost and snow-oh,
– John come down the backstay,
John Dameray!

– John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John-Dameray!

– John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John-Dameray! – John come down the backstay,
John
Dameray!

* 2 *

My ma she wrote to me,
“My son, come home from sea.”

* 3 *

Got no monay and no clo’es,
Am knocking out of doors.

* 4 *

My home I soon will be in,
And then we’ll have some gin.

* 5 *

From sea I will keep clear,
And live by selling beer.

Related to this sea shanty

Donkey Riding (Stamp-n-go)

Cant Ye Hilo? (short drag)

Young Girls Cant You Hilo? (short drag)

O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

“O Whos Been Here” is a shanty mentioned by Stan Hugill when He described the “Hog-eye Man” shanty. This song (unfortunately not even a bit of the verse more), we can find in the “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January 1914 page 42). Song was noted by Cecil J. Sharp, sung by Mr. John Allen (aged 67), 183, Adelaide Road, Feb, 18th, 1909. Cecil Sharp tells us that this song is evidently a version of the “Hog-eyed” or “Hawk’s-eyed Man”. The words of this shanty (a favorite when the ship was being hauled into the dock), refers to life ashore, and this verse may belong to other printed fragments. A reference to the Yankee sailor’s sea boots (as contrasted with the pumps or bare feet of English sailors) occurs also in a version of “John’s gone to Hilo”.

The source of the O Whos Been Here

The music: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January, 1914 page 42).
The lyrics: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January, 1914 page 42).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 272).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

O Whos Been Here - music notation

The full lyrics

O Whos Been Here

O who’s been here since I’ve been gone,
A Yankee boy with his sea boots on,

– Ha Ha!
– Ha Ha!

Related to this sea shanty

Johnny Come Down To Hilo

Ten Stone

The Hog-eye Man

The Hawks-Eye Man (Bolton)

Interesting Facts about The Hawks-Eye Man

“The Hawks-Eye Man” mentioned by Stan Hugill in “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, comes from “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 9 (1906 page 248, 249). In the Journal, the author mention the sung as the capstan shanty in the Southport, January 1906, sung by Mr. W. Bolton. In the description, we can find that this curious tune has, like “Shangadore” (probably a version of Shanandore), a decided Negro flavor. We also can find that a very similar version of this song was taken down on board ship in 1862-4; and was printed in “Yachting Monthly” magazine in the article “The Sea Shanty” (issue October 1906).
Also the “Hog-eye Man” (given under the heading “Hauling into Blackwall Dock, 1862”), the writer of the article says: “This shanty was not allowed so long as any passengers were aboard; directly they were landed this was the only shanty that would suit sailor John. The words cannot be given, but the tune is characteristic. It is of Negro origin, from the slave states”.

The source of The Hawks-Eye Man

The music: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 9 (1906 page 248).
The lyrics: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 9 (1906 page 248, 249).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 271).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The full lyrics

The Hawks-Eye Man (Bolton)

Oh! the ‘awk’s-eye man is the man for me,
And when he comes ashore he has a jolly spree,

– And the ‘awk’s-eye –
– Roll the boat ashore, And the ‘awk’s-eye
– Roll the boat ashore, And the ‘awk’s-eye, Ho!
– She wants the ‘awk’s-eye man.

* 2 *

Sally in the garden sifting sand.
And Jenny in House with the hawk’s-eye man.

Related to this sea shanty

The Hog-eyed Man – Cecil Sharp

Hog-eye Man – Bullen

Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)