O Whos Been Here – Cecil Sharp

“O Whos Been Here” is a shanty mentioned by Stan Hugill when He described the “Hog-eye Man” shanty. This song (unfortunately not even a bit of the verse more), we can find in the “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January 1914 page 42). Song was noted by Cecil J. Sharp, sung by Mr. John Allen (aged 67), 183, Adelaide Road, Feb, 18th, 1909. Cecil Sharp tells us that this song is evidently a version of the “Hog-eyed” or “Hawk’s-eyed Man”. The words of this shanty (a favorite when the ship was being hauled into the dock), refers to life ashore, and this verse may belong to other printed fragments. A reference to the Yankee sailor’s sea boots (as contrasted with the pumps or bare feet of English sailors) occurs also in a version of “John’s gone to Hilo”.

The source of the O Whos Been Here

The music: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January, 1914 page 42).
The lyrics: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 18 (January, 1914 page 42).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 272).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

O Whos Been Here - music notation

The full lyrics

O Whos Been Here

O who’s been here since I’ve been gone,
A Yankee boy with his sea boots on,

– Ha Ha!
– Ha Ha!

Related to this sea shanty

Johnny Come Down To Hilo

Ten Stone

The Hog-eye Man

The Hawks-Eye Man (Bolton)

Interesting Facts about The Hawks-Eye Man

“The Hawks-Eye Man” mentioned by Stan Hugill in “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, comes from “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 9 (1906 page 248, 249). In the Journal, the author mention the sung as the capstan shanty in the Southport, January 1906, sung by Mr. W. Bolton. In the description, we can find that this curious tune has, like “Shangadore” (probably a version of Shanandore), a decided Negro flavor. We also can find that a very similar version of this song was taken down on board ship in 1862-4; and was printed in “Yachting Monthly” magazine in the article “The Sea Shanty” (issue October 1906).
Also the “Hog-eye Man” (given under the heading “Hauling into Blackwall Dock, 1862”), the writer of the article says: “This shanty was not allowed so long as any passengers were aboard; directly they were landed this was the only shanty that would suit sailor John. The words cannot be given, but the tune is characteristic. It is of Negro origin, from the slave states”.

The source of The Hawks-Eye Man

The music: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 9 (1906 page 248).
The lyrics: “Journal of The Folk Song Society” – No 9 (1906 page 248, 249).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 271).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The full lyrics

The Hawks-Eye Man (Bolton)

Oh! the ‘awk’s-eye man is the man for me,
And when he comes ashore he has a jolly spree,

– And the ‘awk’s-eye –
– Roll the boat ashore, And the ‘awk’s-eye
– Roll the boat ashore, And the ‘awk’s-eye, Ho!
– She wants the ‘awk’s-eye man.

* 2 *

Sally in the garden sifting sand.
And Jenny in House with the hawk’s-eye man.

Related to this sea shanty

The Hog-eyed Man – Cecil Sharp

Hog-eye Man – Bullen

Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)

Hog-eye Man – Bullen

“The Hog-eye Man”, this version comes from “Songs Of Sea Labour” by F.T. Bullen & W.F. Arnold (1914) (1st ed: p 19). The usual place of use for this shanty was the capstan. Also, in Bullen’s book this song, is settled in the chapter: “Windlass and Capstan Chanteys”. Some of the shanties in Bullen’s book are well described, unfortunately not in this case. The only we can get in this case is the description of five shanties together. One of those songs is “The Hog-eye Man” this what says Bullen’s description: “The next five Chanties have very little to distinguish them. The tunes are good but not super-excellent and from the great similarity between them…”.

The source of The Hog-eye Man – Bullen

The music: “Songs Of Sea Labour” by F.T. Bullen & W.F. Arnold (1914) (1st ed: p 19).
The lyrics: “Songs Of Sea Labour” by F.T. Bullen & W.F. Arnold (1914) (1st ed: p 19).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 270).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hog-eye Man - Bullen - music notation

The full lyrics

Hog-eye Man – Bullen

Oh! de hog-eye man is the man for me,
he wuk all day on ‘de big – le – vee Oh!

– Hog-eye! Pig-eye!
– Row de boat a shore fer de hog-eye O!
– an all she wants is de hog-eye man.

Related to this sea shanty

Johnny Come Down To Hilo

Ten Stone

The Hog-eye Man

The Hog-eyed Man – Cecil Sharp

“The Hog-eyed Man”, this version comes from “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 6), in the description of this song Sharp tells us that, the tune of this chantey negro influence, especially in the curious characteristic rhythm of the chorus. The usual place of use for this shanty was the capstan.

The source of The Hog-eyed Man

The music: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 6).
The lyrics: English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 6).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 270).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Hog-eyed Man - Cecil Sharp - music notation

The full lyrics

The Hog-eyed Man

O who’s been here since I’ve been gone?
Some big black nigger with his sea – boots on.

And a hog-eye!
– Steady up a jig and a hog-eye!
– Steady up a jig,
– And all she wants is her hog-eye man!

* 2 *

The hog-eyed man is the man for me,
He brought me down from Tennessee.

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Johnny Come Down To Hilo

Ten Stone

The Hog-eye Man

The Hog-eye Man

Interesting Facts about The Hog-eye Man

“The Hog-eye Man”, Stan Hugill mentions that he has no idea why this shanty was treated in a special way by collectors. Namely, collectors always wrote about this shanty in a “muted tone”, it is about the obscenity of the text, but as the author of “Shanties from the Seven Seas” recalls, Other shanties were equally or even more indecent. Terry writes about the meaning of the term “hog-eye” and what a disgusting meaning it had to sailors, but with all the convoluted statements, it doesn’t really explain anything. Captain Whall explains the use of the word “hog-eye”.

He claims it was the kind of barge invented for the newly emerged land trade that used America’s canals and rivers during the Gold Rush (1850). According to Stan Hugill, Terry mixed up words, thought of “Dead-eye”, and wrote about “hog-eye”, that first word had both nautical and obscene meanings. However, the solo parts of this song were indecent and a lot of camouflage was required before the song could be released to the public. The usual place of use for this shanty was the capstan.

The source of The Hog-eye Man

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 269).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 269, 270).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Hog-eye Man - music notation

The full lyrics

The Hog-eye Man

The hog-eye man is the man for me,
He came a sailin’ from o’er the sea,

– An’ a hog-eye!
– Row the boat ashore for her hog-eye!
– Row the boat ashore wid her hog-eye O!
– She wants the hog-eye man!

* 2 *

He came to a shack where his Sally she did dwell,
And he knocked on the door and he rang her bell.

* 3 *

Oh, Sally’s in the garden, pickin’ peas,
An’ the hair of her head hangin’ down to her knees.

* 4 *

Oh, who’s bin here since I’ve bin gone?
Some big buck nigger wid his sea-boots on.

* 5 *

If I cotch him here wid me Sally any more,
I’ll sling me hook an’ I’ll go to sea some more.

* 6 *

Oh, Sally in the parlour a-sittin’ on his knee,
A-kissin’ of the sailor who’d come o’er the seas.

* 7 *

Sally in the garden siftin’ sand,
An’ the hog-eye man sittin’ hand-in-hand.

* 8 *

Oh, Sally in the garden shellin’ peas,
With her young hog-eye all a-sittin’ on her knee.

* 9 *

Oh, I won’t wed a nigger, no, I’m damned if I do,
He’s got jiggers in his feet an’ he can’t wear a shoe.

* 10 *

Oh, the hog-eye man is the man for me,
He wuz raised way down in Tennessee.

* 11 *

Oh, go fetch me down me ridin’-cane,
For I’m off to see me darlin’ Jane.

* 12 *

Oh, a hog-eye ship an’ a hog-eye crew,
A hog-eye mate an’ a skipper too.

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The Ox-eyed Man (Davis & Tozer)

Interesting Facts about The Ox-eyed Man

“The Ox-eyed Man” is a song that comes from Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, p 82) – (1906). Ferris & Tozer’s book was assigned to categories “Songs for pumping the ship out”, which clearly tells us it is a pump shanty.

The source of The Ox-eyed Man

The music: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, p 82) – (1906)
The lyrics: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition, p 82) – (1906)
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 269).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The full lyrics

The Ox-eyed Man

The ox-eyed man is the man for me,
He came a – sailing from o’er the sea,
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 2 *

Oh May in the garden a shelling her peas,
And birds singing gaily among the trees,
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 3 *

Oh, May looked up and she saw her fate
In the ox-eyed man passing by the gate
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 4 *

Oh, May in the garden a-shelling her peas,
Smil’d on the stranger who’d come o’er the seas
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 5 *

The ox-eyed man gave a fond look of love,
And charmed May’s heart which was pure as a dove.
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 6 *

Oh, May in the parlour a-sitting on his knee,
And kissing the sailor who’d come o’er the sea.
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

* 7 *

Oh, May in the garden a shelling her peas,
Now weeps for the sailor who sail’d o’er the seas.
– Heigh – ho for the ox – eyed man.

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So Early In The Morning (A)

The Lowlands Low (C)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Ten Stone

Interesting Facts about the Ten Stone

“Ten Stone” is a windlass song given only by Bullen & Arnold. The song is Negro origin. Bullen mentioned he heard it himself when was sang by Negro working a dolly-winch on his ship in Georgetown, “Demera”. The music and lyrics are exactly the same as given originally in F.T. Bullen’s “Songs Of Sea Labour” (1914).

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 268).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 268).

The Record of the Ten Stone

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Ten Stone - music notation

The full lyrics

Ten Stone

I neber seen de like sence I ben born!
– Way, ay, ay ay ay!
Nigger on the ice an’ a-hoe-in’ up corn,
– Way, ay, ay ay ay!

Ten stoone! ten stone!
– ten stone de win’ am o-ber,
Ten-ny git a-long, Ten-ny blow the horn,
– As we go march-in’ o-ber!

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The Lowlands Low (B)

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer)

Interesting Facts about The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer)

As Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer mentioned in their book “The Girl With The Blue Dress” was a song for “pumping the ship out”. It has slightly different music than Harding’s version, and I cannot lose the opportunity to reconstruct this song as the pumping shanty, also the text is different than Harding’s Barbadian version.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906)
The lyrics: Sailors’ songs or “chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906)
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 267).

The Record of this sea shanty

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer) - music notation

The full lyrics

The Girl With The Blue Dress (Davis & Tozer)

A girl asleep with a blue dress on,
– SHAKE her, Johnnie, SHAKE her.
An unsafe couch she’s resting on,
– SHAKE her, and so WAKE her.

* 2 *

Storm clouds are gath’ring on our lee,
And soon aback our sail may be,

* 3 *

She may be drenched with salt sea spray.
So go and rouse her quick I say.

* 4 *

White caps are dancing upon the sea,
Run quick, or else to late you’ll be,

* 5 *

She’s lying asleep there on the deck,
No thought of sea, or gale, or wreck.

* 6 *

A girl asleep with a blue dress on,
An unsafe couch she’s resting on,

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (A)

So Early In The Morning (B)

The Lowlands Low (B)

The Gal With The Blue Dress

Interesting Facts about The Gal With The Blue Dress

This is another great song we have from the Harding Barbadian, a shipmate of Stan Hugill, he mentions in his book that Harding considered this song as one of the best in his repertoire for halyards. It is the Negro origin song, probably one used by cotton hosiers.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 267).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 267, 268).

The Record of The Gal With The Blue Dress

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The full lyrics

The Gal With The Blue Dress (Harding)

A gal asleep wid a blue dress on,
– SHAKE her, Johnny, SHAKE her!
She’s waitin’ there for yer Uncle Tom,
– SHAKE ‘er, an’ we’ll WAKE ‘er!

* 2 *

This gal she did look good to me,
‘Cos I had bin ten months at sea’

* 3 *

She’s Down East gal wid a Down East style,
For a dollar a time it’s worth while.

* 4 *

Roust an’ shake her is the cry,
The bloody topmast sheave is dry!

* 5 *

A big wind comes from the Wes’-nor’-west,
This gal ain’t gonner git no rest.

* 6 *

Shake ‘er, bullies, oh, helm’s a-lee,
She’ll git washed out wid a big green sea.

* 7 *

Her oilskins they are all in pawn,
It’s wet an’ draughty round Cape Horn.

* 8 *

So roust ‘er from down below,
An’ haul away for yer Uncle Joe.

* 9 *

This gal she is a high-brown lass,
High-brown lass in a flash blue dress.

* 10 *

So roust ‘er be quick I say,
An’ make yer port an’ take yer pay.

* 11 *

Soon we’ll be down Mobile Bay,
Screwin’ cotton for to git our pay.

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O Johnny Come To Hilo – Cecil Sharp

Interesting Facts about O Johnny Come To Hilo – Cecil Sharp

“Johnny Come Down To Hilo” shanty was given by many collectors: Sharp, Terry (who even make it popular in schools), and Doerflinger. The normal environment for “Johnny Come Down To Hilo” was the work at the capstan. This version comes from “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914). Sharp in his book on page 68 left us a short description of this shanty, says that:
“Versions of this chantey are given by Bullen (No. 10) and Tozer (No. 42). Presumably, Hilo is the seaport of that name on the east coast of Hawaii Island.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 19).
The lyrics: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 19).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 267).

The Record of O Johnny Come To Hilo – Cecil Sharp

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

O Johnny Come To Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

O Johnny Come To Hilo

O a poor old man came a riding by,
Says I: Old man, your horse will die,

– O, Johnny come to Hi-lo,
– O-poor old man.
– O-wake her,
– O
shake her,
– O-shake that girl with the blue dress on,
– O-Johnny come to Hi
lo,
– Poor old man.

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