As Off to The South’ard We Go – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the As Off to The South’ard We Go

“As Off to The Southard We Go” is the shanty from the “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906), mentioned by Stan Hugill on the occasion of the description of the “Heave Away Cheerily O!” shanty. I have to mention Stan Hugill’s description that which says the song is the capstan song, but In Ferris & Tozer’s book is in the chapter “Anchor Songs”. So what is the difference? Well, the “capstan songs” is a more general term, due to the capstan can be used in many more sailor works than raise the anchor.

Raising the anchor happens only on the main capstan, and the tempo is quite established. But the term anchor song is ambiguous as well because the anchor can be raised by using the capstan or brake windlass. The song can be sung for both due to the usual timing used for brake-windlass work being 2/4 or 6/8 (same as on the music notation), so I decided to reconstruct this song as the Brake Windlass Shanty.


One more issue is that Stan Hugill suggested that this song was published in the first edition of the Davis & Tozer book, which is not true because I have a copy of this book and in the first set of 24 shanties from the book this shanty not appeared. I cannot confirm that song is on the second edition, but also I have the third edition of the book which contains a set of 50 shanties, and the song appear on page 28 and 29, the third edition has been in print in 1906.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906).
The lyrics: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (3rd Edition) – (1906).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 309, 310).

The Record of the As Off to The South’ard We Go

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

As Off to The South'ard We Go - music notation

And the full lyrics

As Off to The South’ard We Go

The wind is free, and we’re bound for sea,
– Heave away cheerily, ho, oh!
The lasses are waving to you and to me,
– As off to the South’ard we go-o,
– As off to the South’ard we go.

– Sing, my lads, cheerily,
– Heave, my lads, cheerily,
– Heave away cheerily, oh, oh!
– For gold that we prize, And sunier skies,
– Away to the South’ard we go.

* 2 *

They’re waving good-bye and with tearful eye,
Sing cheer up, my darling, and wipe your tears dry,

* 3 *

They’re crying “Come back, my dear Tom or dear Jack!
There’s water in front, and no door at the back,

* 4 *

We want sailors bold, who can work for their gold,
And stand a good wetting without catching cold,

* 5 *

The sailor is true to his Sal or his Sue,
As long as he’s able to keep ’em in view,

Related to this sea shanty

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso (French)

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Heave Away Me Johnnies C

Heave Away Boys Heave Away B

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Boys Heave Away B

“Heave Away Boys Heave Away B” is another song on Stan Hugill’s “Shanties From The Seven Seas” which opens the family of the shanties with the word “heave”, strangely, this song is not for to heave, it is the opposite, it is a hauling song specifically is the halyard shanty. This version is specifically of the West Indies origin. Stan Hugill learned this song from a shantyman known as Harry Lauder of St. Lucia, B.W.I in 1932. Stan Hugill has a theory that the word “heave” on this song comes from, that son in the past was used by Negro Stevedoores of Mobile Bay and elsewhere at the jackscrews when stowing cotton aboard the old wooden ships.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 309).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 309).

The Record of the Heave Away Boys Heave Away B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Boys Heave Away B -music notation

The full lyrics

Heave Away Boys Heave Away B

Oh! I love the sailor an’ the sailor loves me,
– HE–AVE away, boys, HE-AVE away!
He comes to my window ev’ry mornin’ at three,
– HE–AVEaway, boys, HE–AVE away!

* 2 *

An’ when we are happy we tolls de ol’bell,
An’ when we is sad yiz can all go to hell,

* 3 *

I love fat widow down Rotherhithe way,
An’ when she next sees me, to me she will say.

* 4 *

‘Oh, Johnny I’ve waited for you to return,
So I can spend freely all the money you earn.’

* 5 *

Oh, roll the ol’ chariot, long may she roll,
Why don’t the mate shake ‘er, oh, God damn his soul.

* 6 *

Oh, heave away, bullies, for ol’ Mobile Bay,
The gals there will help yer to spend yer pay-day.

* 7 *

When I was a young man an’ well in me prime,
I’d love all them yaller gals two at a time.

* 8 *

But now I’m an old man an, don’t feel so young,
I’d sooner have lashin’s an’ lashin’s o’ rum!

* 9 *

Oh, I,ve got a sister nine foot tall,
She sleeps in the kitchen with her feet in the hall.

Related to this sea shanty

Heave Away Boys Heave Away A

Leave Her Johnny – Halyard

John Kanaka

Heave Away Boys Heave Away A

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Boys Heave Away A

“Heave Away Boys Heave Away A” is the first shanty on Stan Hugill’s “Shanties From The Seven Seas” which opens the family of the songs with the word “heave”, strangely enough, this song is not to heave, it is opposite hauling song specifically is the halyard shanty. This version is specifically of the West Indies origin. Stan Hugill learned this song from a colored seaman of St. Vincent, B.W.I.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).

The Record of the Heave Away Boys Heave Away A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Boys Heave Away A - music notation

The full lyrics

Heave Away Boys Heave Away A

Heave away, heave away, for the White Man’s dollars,
– HE
AVE away, boys, HE-AVE away!
Heave away, heave away, for the White Man’s dollars,
– HE
AVEaway, boys, HEAVE away!

* 2 *

Heave away, heave away, for the merchant’s money,
Heave away, heave away for the merchant’s money,

* 3 *

Heave away, heave away, for the buckra’s silver,
Heave away, heave away, for the buckra’s silver,

* 4 *

Don’t let this money bring contention,
Don’t let this money bring contention,

* 5 *

Heave away, heave away an’ let’s get goin’,
Heave away, heave away an’ let’s get goin’,

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Boys Blow (B)

Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

Hourra Mes Boués Hourra! (French)

Heave Away – Colcord

Interesting Facts about theHeave Away – Colcord

“Heave Away – Colcord” – one of the mentioned versions of the “Heave Away Me Johnnies” shanty, in Stan Hugill’s book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” on page 308. Joanna Colcord in her book says: “Heave Away,” or “We’re All Bound to Go,” shows little trace of its origin in the form in which its latest seagoing days were spent. I do reconstruct this song as the capstan song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Roll And Go – Songs Of American Sailormen” by Joanna C. Colcord (1st Edition) – (1924).
The lyrics: “Roll And Go – Songs Of American Sailormen” by Joanna C. Colcord (1st Edition) – (1924).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).

The Record of the Heave Away – Colcord

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away - Colcord - music notation

And the full lyrics

Heave Away – Colcord

Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool, more times we’re bound for France,
– Heave away, my Johnny, heave away away!
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool, more times we’re bound for France,
– And away, my Johnny boy, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

Oh, Johnny, you’re a rover, and to-day you sail away.
It’s I will be your own sweethart if you will only stay.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

Interesting Facts about the Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

“Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer” – one of the mentioned versions of the “Heave Away Me Johnnies” shanty, in Stan Hugill’s book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” on page 308. The Ferris and Tozer book song is in chapter “Anchor Songs” on pages 8 and 9. Following Davis and Tozer this song will be reconstructed as the anchor capstan shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (1st Edition) – (1886).
The lyrics: “Sailors’ songs or “Chanties” by Frederick J Davis and Ferris Tozer (1st Edition) – (1886).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 308).

The Record of the Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The full lyrics

Were All Bound To Go – Davis And Tozer

As I was walking out one day,
Down by the Albert docks,
I saw the charming maids so gay,
A coming down in flocks,


– Heave away, my jolly boys,
– We’re all bound to go.

* 2 *

There was fair Poll and saucy Sue,
And merry laughing May,
And Sal and Ann, and Bessie true,
Dressed out in bunting gay.

* 3 *

They all were there to see a ship
Of note and noble fame,
That was about to make a trip,
The “Bengal” was her name.

* 4 *

The day was fine when she set sail,
The wind was blowing free;
But it had freshened to a gale,
Ere we were fair at sea.

* 5 *

We snugged her down and laid her to,
With reef’d main-topsail set;
“It was no joke,” I say to you,
Our bunks and clothes were wet.

* 6 *

The gale in fury had increased
Ere night was fairly come;
And ev’ry lubber never ceased
To wish himself at home.

* 7 *

It clear’d off fine at break of day,
The sails were set again;
The “Bengal” speed like life away
Across the raging main.

* 8 *

So gaily let your voices ring,
My Johnnies heave away.
We’re bound to go, so better sing
Than pipe your tears away.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Were All Bound To Go – Sampson

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

“Were All Bound To Go – Sampson”, according to Sampson is an outward bound capstan shanty, definitely of Liverpool origin, and the proof is Tapscott and Clarence Dock, Tapscott was a well-known Liverpool owner of sailing ships engaged in the American emigrant trade from 1842 to 1860.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Seven Seas Shanty Book” by John Sampson (1927 p 8, 9).
The lyrics: “The Seven Seas Shanty Book” by John Sampson (1927 p 8, 9).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 307).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Were All Bound To Go - Sampson - music notation

The full lyrics

Were All Bound To Go – Sampson

One day as I was walking down by the Clarence Dock,
– Heave away my bullies, heave away, ay
One day as I was walking down by the Clarence Dock,
– Heave away my bully boys, Were all bound to go.

* 2 *

I met a pretty Irish girl who gave a smile to me,
I met a pretty Irish girl who gave a smile to me,

* 3 *

“Good morning dear” I said to her “Good morning, Sir” said she,
“Good morning dear” I said to her “Good morning, Sir” said she,

* 4 *

“And are you Mr Tapscott whose ships are on the sea?”
“And are you Mr Tapscott whose ships are on the sea?”

* 5 *

“And have you got a packet ship for North Americee?”
“And have you got a packet ship for North Americee?”

* 6 *

Said I “My dear, you need not fear, if you come along with me,”
Said I “My dear, you need not fear, if you come along with me,”

* 7 *

“For I have got a Packet ship to carry you over the sea,”
“For I have got a Packet ship to carry you over the sea,”

* 8 *

“With more than fifty emigrants bound for Americee,”
“With more than fifty emigrants bound for Americee,”

Related to this sea shanty

Heave Away Me Johnnies B

Leave her Johnny Leave Her – Capstan

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Heave Away Me Johnnies B

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

“Heave Away Me Johnnies B” initially was a genuine brake-windlass shanty. Brake-windlass work was too heavy to move levers up and down, so movement from top to bottom has mid-step on the waist. The usual timing used was 2/4 or 6/8. This particular version was the most popular version according to Stan Hugill, singing in the latter days of sail as the capstan shanty. “The Last Shantyman” also says usually sang at 4/4 time, apparently not in this case because the music notation says 6/8 time, but in my reconstruction will try to accommodate this tempo to reconstruct it as capstan shanty anyways.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 306).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 306, 307).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Me Johnnies B - music notation

The full lyrics

Heave Away Me Johnnies B

Now Johnny was a rover, an’ today he sailed away,
– Heave away ay ay, me Johnnies, heave away-away!
Sez She I’ll be yer sweethart dear if ye will only stay,
– An away me bully boys, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool, sometimes we’re bound for france,
But now we’re bound to New York town to give the girls a chance,

* 3 *

Our advance note’s in our pocket, boys, it sure will take us fair,
An’ now a cruise down Lime Street, boys, an’ to the American Bar.

* 4 *

In two days’ time we’ll be outward bound an’ down the Mersey we’ll clip,
The gals’ll all be waiting, boys, when get back next trip.

* 5 *

The Peter’s flyin’ at the fore, the Pilot’s waiting the tide,
An’ soon we’ll be bound out again, bound for the other side.

* 6 *

An’ when we’re homeward bound again, our pockets lined once more,
We’ll spend it all with the gals, me boys, an’ go to sea for more.

* 7 *

So gaily let yer voices ring, me bullies heave ‘n’ bust,
‘Tain’t no use a caterwaulin’ — growl yer may, but go yer must.

Related to this sea shanty

Ooker John

Hooker John (Harding)

Across The Western Ocean ( I )

Heave Away Me Johnnies A – Brake Windlass Shanty

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away Me Johnnies A

“Heave Away Me Johnnies A” initially was a genuine brake-windlass shanty. Brake-windlass work was too heavy to move levers up and down, so movement from top to bottom has mid-step on the waist. The usual timing used was 2/4 or 6/8. This song is one of My first recorded shanties from Stan Hugill’s “Shanties From the Seven Seas” book I recorded.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 303).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 303, 304).

The Record of the Heave Away Me Johnnies A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away Me Johnnies A - music notation

And the full lyrics

Heave Away Me Johnnies A

Oh as I walked out one summer’s morn, (SLOW)
Down by the Salthouse Docks, (QUICKER)
– Heave away, me Johnnies, heave away-away!
I met an emigrant Irish gal, (SLOW)
conversin’ with Tapscott, (QUICKER)
– An away me bully boys, we’re all bound to go!

* 2 *

‘Good mornin’, Mister Tapscott, sir’, ‘Good-mornin, me gal,’ sez he,
‘Oh, it’s have jiz got a packet-ship, All bound for Amerikee?’

* 3 *

‘Oh, yes I have got a packet-ship, I have got one or two,
I’ve got the Jinny Walker and I’ve got the Kangaroo.

* 4 *

‘I’ve got the Jinny Walker and today she does set sail,
With five an’ fifty emigrants an’ a thousands bags o’ meal.’

* 5 *

The day was fine when we set sail, but night had barely come,
An’ every lubber never ceased to wish himself at home.

* 6 *

That night as we was sailin’ through the Channel of St. James,
A dirty nor’west wind came up an’ druv us back again.

* 7 *

We snugged her down an’ we laid her to, with reefed main tops’l set,
It was no joke I tell you, ‘cos our bunks an’ clothes wuz wet.

* 8 *

It cleared up fine at break o’ day, an’ we set sail once more,
An’ every son-o’-a-gun wuz glad when we reached Amerikee’s shore.

* 9 *

Bad luck to them Irish sailor-boys, bad luck to them I sais,
For they all got drunk, broke into me bunk, an’ stole me clothes away.

* 10 *

‘Twas at the Castle Gardens, oh, they landed me ashore,
An’ if I marry a Yankee boy, I’ll cross the seas no more.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (extra verses)

Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)

Horraw For The Blackball Line

Heave Away – American Folk Song

Interesting Facts about the Heave Away

“Heave Away” the song from “The American Songbag” by Carl Sandburg (1927 page 407), is another clue to finding the possible origin of the “Heave Away, My Johnnies” shanty. Stan Hugill on the occasion of this song debated with himself about the shanty having stemmed from the following Negro slave song “Heave Away”. Although the tune bears no resemblance to the shanty the words seem to have some connection. Perhaps this is one of the songs that made it through the shanties of Mobile Bay or New Orleans. But on the other hand, it may be that Negro Hoosiers took it from Irish seamen-stevedores. Carl Sandburg claims that the following song is a “negro fireman’s” song and is one of the “few slavery-era work songs still in existence”.

The source of  the Heave Away

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 301).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 301).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Heave Away - music notation

The full lyrics

Heave Away

Heave away, he-ave away!
I’d rather court a yellow gal
Than work for Henry Clay,
He
ave away, heave away!
Yellow gal, I want to go.
I’d rather court a yellow gal
Than work for Henry Clay.
He
ave away! Yellow gal, I want to go!

Related to this song

Lay Me Down – Folk Song

Hieland Laddie (B) – stevedores chant

The Powder Monkey – Shore Sea-Song

The Irish Emigrant – Irish Folk Song

Interesting Facts about The Irish Emigrant

“The Irish Emigrant” is the final piece of Stan Hugill’s research on the very fine shanty “Heave Away, My Johnnies”. After the “Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )” which comes from Mr. T. E. Elwell. Eventually, the full version he took from his Irish friend; a native of Wexford, turned up the full version, which his friend called “The Irish Emigrant”.
And eventually the story of the trick used by Mr. Tapscott to use the word ‘meal’. The words pronounced in Irish fashion sounded like ‘mail’, giving rise to the belief that the ship concerned was carrying ‘mail’ and belonged to the fastest in the world smart packet ships. But in actual fact, these ships carried emigrants across to the New World were very often a real thirt-rates, and the food the poor Irish emigrants had daily was “meal” – the Irish pronunciation of which was “male”, hence the error.

The source of The Irish Emigrant

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 299).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 300, 301).

The Record

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

The Irish Emigrant - music notation

The full lyrics

The Irish Emigrant

As I walked out one morning down by the Clarence Dock,
I heard a bully Irish boy conversing wid Tapscott;
‘Good morning, Mister Tapscott, would ye be arter telling me,
If ye’ve got a ship bound for New York in the state of Amerikee?’

– Lay me down, lay me down,
– Lay me down do!
– Lay me down, here we go, Mrs. McQuale,
– Here we go to, lay me down, Mrs. O’Halligan,
– Jinny hooraw!
– Fire away, Bridget, I’ll bully for you!

* 2 *

‘Yes, yes, me handsome Irish boy, I’ve got a ship or two,
One’s laying at the wharf there, awaitin’ for her crew,
She is a handsome packet and on Friday she will sail,
And now she’s takin’ her on board a thousand bags o’ meal.’

* 3 *

So then I paid me passage down in solid Irish gold,
And when the packet sailed, boys, ’twas on the yellow grog road;
There was roars of milly murder, the loikes wuz never known,
An’ ev’ry mother’s son, me bhoys, did wish himself at home.

* 4 *

On the day on which we set out, ’twas on the first o’ May,
The Capen came upon the deck, these words to us did say,
‘Cheer up, me beefy Irish bhoys, now we have set all sail,
We’ll give ye a feed o’ pork an’ beans, tomorrow — yellow meal!’

* 5 *

Next day when we sailin’ down the channel right as rain,
A nor’west wind began to blow, an’ druv us back again.
Bad luck to the Joey Walker and the day that we set sail,
For them packet sailors broken open me chest, an’ stole me yellow meal.

* 6 *

Now that I am in Amerikee, a-working on a canal,
I’ll niver go home in a packet ship, I know I niver shall,
But I’ll ship in a darn big National boat, that carries both steam an’ sail,
With lashin’s o’ beef, an’ plenty to eat, an’ none of yer yellow meal.

Related to this victorian ditty

The Ghost of John James Christopher Benjamin Binns (Victorian Ditty)

Lay Me Down – Folk Song

Across The Western Ocean ( 2 )