Tommys Gone To Hilo – Harlow

Interesting Facts about the Tommys Gone To Hilo

The “Tommys Gone To Hilo” was a halyard shanty usually sang for raise a topsails yards. This song mentioned by Stan Hugill comes from “The Making Of A Sailor” by Frederick Pease Harlow (1928 1st ed: p 258, 259). Due to the different melody and the theme which “smack of “South Australia,” it is worth reconstructing it.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “The Making Of A Sailor” by Frederick Pease Harlow (1928 1st ed: p 258).
The lyrics: “The Making Of A Sailor” by Frederick Pease Harlow (1928 1st ed: p 258, 259).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 261).

The Record of the Tommys Gone To Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Tommys Gone To Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Tommys Gone To Hilo

Oh, Tommy’s gone, what shall I do?
– A-way, Hilo!
Tommy’s gone and I’ll go too,
– Tommy’s gone to HI-lo!

* 2 *

To Hilo town, we’ll see her through,
For Tommy’s gone with a rulling crew.

* 3 *

Oh, Tommy’s gone from down below,
And up aloft this yard must go.

* 4 *

Oh, Tommy’s gone, we’ll ne’er say nay
Until the mate sing out, “Belay!”

* 5 *

I think I heard the old man say,
We’ll get our grog three times a day.

* 6 *

Oh, one more pull and that will do,
So let her roll and wet us through.

* 7 *

She’ll ship it green again to-day;
The mate is sore and hell’s to pay.

* 8 *

Oh, Tommy’s gone, what shall I do?
The mate is sore and so are you.

* 9 *

Oh, Tommy’s gone and left us, too;
We like the mate – Like hell we do!

Related to this sea shanty

Toms Gone To Hilo

Reuben Ranzo II – Doerflinger

Poor Old Reuben Ranzo

Toms Gone To Hilo

Interesting Facts about the Toms Gone To Hilo

The “Thoms Gone To Hilo” was a halyard shanty usually sang for raise a topsails yards, and one that was never liked by mats because sung by a good shantyman slowed down the pulls, due to the lethargic nature in which the shanties are sung. Difficult song for shantymen, however very popular with the crowd, especially for heavy yard lifts.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 261).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 261, 262).

The Record of the Toms Gone To Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Toms Gone To Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Toms Gone To Hilo

Tommy’s gone, what shall I do?
– A-WAY you HELO-o-o!
Ooh! Tommy’s gone an’ I’ll go too,
– TOM’s gone to HI-lo!

* 2 *

Tommy’s gone to Hilo town,
Where all them gals they do come down.

* 3 *

Hilo town is in Peru,
It’s just the place for me an’ you.

* 4 *

Tommy’s gone to Liverpool,
To Liverpool, that packet school.

* 5 *

Yankee shellbacks ye’ll see there,
Wid red-topped boots an’ short cut hair.

* 6 *

He signed for two pound ten a month,
No more than two pound ten a month,

* 7 *

Tommy’s gone to Baltimore,
To dance upon a sandy floor.

* 8 *

Tommy’s gone to Mobile Bay,
A-screwin’ cotton all the day.

* 9 *

Tommy’s gone to fair Quebec,
A-stowin’ timber on the deck.

* 10 *

Tommy’s gone to Cally-o,
He won’t come back from there, I know.

* 11 *

Tommy’s gone to Vallipo,
He’ll dance them Spanish gals, y’know.

12 *

Tommy’s gone to ‘Frisco Bay
In a Cape Horner the other day.

13 *

Tommy’s gone to Pernambuck,
He’s gone to get a nip an’ tuck.

14 *

Tommy’s gone to Montreal,
In a packet ship wid sky’ls tall.

15 *

Tommy’s gone to Rye-o Grand,
He’s rollin’ in the yeller sand.

16 *

Tommy’s gone to to Singapore,
Oh, Tommy’s gone for evermore.

17 *

Oh, haul away, me bully boys.
Oh, haul away, kick up some noise.

18 *

Now hoist ‘er up an’ show ‘er clew,
Oh, we’re the bastards to kick ‘er though!

19 *

One more pull, lads, then belay,
Ooh! One more pull an’ then belay.

Related to this sea shanty

Shallow Brown – Harry Perry

Shiloh Brown

Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version

Shiloh Brown

Interesting Facts about the Shiloh Brown

Stan Hugill says “Shiloh Brown” is the link between “Shallow Brown” and “Tom’s Gone To Hilo”. These two stanzas of this beautiful song come from “Fenceless Meadows Tales Of The Sea” by Bill Adams (1923). At first, looks like “Shallow Brown”, but actually according to Stan Hugill is a variant of “Tom’s Gone To Hilo”.

Because both songs which the “Shiloh Brown” link, are halyard songs, I will reconstruct this song as a halyard shanty. The music used in my reconstruction is the conjunction of music from mentioned linked shanties and the halyard tempo used to it.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: notation or record doesn’t exist.
The lyrics: “Fenceless Meadows Tales Of The Sea” by Bill Adams (1923 page 86).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 260, 261).

The Record of Shiloh Brown

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Shiloh Brown

Oh Johnny’s gone, what shall I do?
– Shil-loh, Shil-loh Brown.
Oh Johnny’s gone, what shall I do?
– Johnny’s gone to Rio

* 2 *

Where Johnny goes, I must go too,
– Shil-loh, Shil-loh Brown.
Where Johnny goes, I must go too,
– Johnny’s gone to Rio

Related to this sea shanty

Shallow Brown D

Blow Boys Blow (odd verses)

Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You

Shallow Brown – Harry Perry

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown – Harry Perry

Shallow Brown – Harry Perry, was mentioned by Stan Hugill, he says that Piggot was given to us in “Journal of the Folk Song Society” an interesting verses: “I’ll cross the Chili mountains, To pump the silver fountains, …” which means that a sailor deserted his ship in some West Coast port and went working in the silver mines of Chili.
I did find the original “Journal of the Folk Song Society” (No. 20, November 1916), and it is a couple of things to clarify. First instead of Piggot song is sung by Mr. Harry Perry (Aged 61), On board the American Liner, S.S. St. Paul. July 21st, 1915. Noted by Cecil J. Sharp. Original title “Shallow Brown (I’m Going Away To Leave You)”, and is noted as pulling shanty, therefore I will reconstruct this song as halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music:”Journal of the Folk Song Society” (No. 20, November 1916)
The lyrics: “Journal of the Folk Song Society” (No. 20, November 1916)
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 260).

The Record of the Shallow Brown – Harry Perry

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown - Harry Perry - music notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown – Harry Perry

I’m going away to leave you, ….,
– SHALlow, O SHALlow Brown.
I’m going away to leave you, ….,
– SHALlow, O SHALlow Brown.

* 2 *

Get my clothes in order.
Get my clothes in order.

* 4 *

The steam-boat sails to-morrow.
The steam-boat sails to-morrow.

* 5 *

I’m bound away for Georgia.
I’m bound away for Georgia.

* 6 *

No more work on plantation.
No more work on plantation.

* 7 *

I’ll cross the wide Atlantic.
I’ll cross the wide Atlantic.

* 8 *

I’ll cross the Chili mountains.
I’ll cross the Chili mountains.

* 9 *

To pump the silver fountains.
To pump the silver fountains.

Related to this sea shanty

Hello Somebody

Shallow Brown B

Blow Boys Blow (C)

Shallow Brown D

 by Jerzy Brzezinski

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown D

Shallow Brown D is a usual version of the general family of the shanties called “Shallow Brown”. At the beginning life of this song, it was used as a pump shanty. As the age of sails progressed, in the late days this song was usually sung at halyards. This version comes from English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 60). In the description of this shanty Cecil Sharp mentioned song was sung to him by Mr. Robert Ellison, at Belvedere, Woolwich, and also mentioned these words have a Negro flavor. Cecil Sharp placed this song into the “Pulling Chanteys” chapter. I will reconstruct this song as a halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 259).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 259).

The Record of the Shallow Brown D

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown D - music notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown D

O I’m going to leave her,
– SHALlow, O SHALlow Brown!
O I’m going to leave her,
– SHALlow, O SHALlow Brown!

* 2 *

Ship on board a whaler,
Ship on board a whaler,

* 3 *

Bound away to St. George’s.
Bound away to St. George’s.

* 4 *

Love you well, Julianna.
Love you well, Julianna.

* 5 *

Massa going to sell me.
Massa going to sell me.

* 6 *

Sell me to a Yankee.
Sell me to a Yankee.

* 7 *

Sell me for the dollar.
Sell me for the dollar.

* 8 *

Great big Spanish dollar.
Great big Spanish dollar.

Related to this sea shanty

Hello Somebody

Shallow Brown B

Blow Boys Blow (C)

Shallow Brown B

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown B

Shallow Brown B is a usual version of the general family of the shanties called “Shallow Brown”. At the beginning life of this song, it was used as a pump shanty. As the age of sails progressed, in the late days this song was usually sung at halyards. Here version of what Stan Hugill has heard from Harding Barbadian. I will reconstruct this song as a halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 258).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 258).

The Record of the Shallow Brown B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown B - music notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown B

Oh! Shallow in the mornin’,
– SHALlow, oh, SHALlow Brown!
Just as the day was dawnin’,
– SHALlow, oh, SHALlow Brown!

* 2 *

She is a bright mulatter,
She hails from Cincinatter

* 3 *

Come put me clothes in order,
The packet sails termorrer.

* 4 *

Once ye wuz sweet and cherry,
But now ye are contrary.

* 5 *

For ye are fat an’ lazy,
Ye nearly drive me crazy.

* 6 *

My half-pay ye’ve spent like chaff,
Ye’d like the other half.

* 7 *

Ye boozed me pay away,
But ye’ve had yer last pay-day.

* 8 *

The packet sails termorrer,
I’ll leave yer without sorrer.

* 9 *

Me clothes are all in pawn,
I’m bound around the Horn.

* 10 *

She won’t miss me when I’ve gone,
She’ll hook some other bum.

Related to this sea shanty

Hello Somebody

Blow Boys Blow (A)

Blow Boys Blow (B)

Hello Somebody

Interesting Facts about the Hello Somebody

“Hello Somebody” is a halyard shanty related to the “Hilo Come Down Below” and “Hilo Boys Hilo”. Stan Hugill’s description of this shanty is quite interesting so first he says, that Captain J. P. Parker it writes a verse of this shanty on his “Log of limejuicer” of the American ship “Tusitalia”, on page 40. Stan Hugill’s version comes from Harding Barbadian who told him that was very popular in ships with “coloured” crews. Also, William Main Doerflinger in his book gives a three-verse example of this song, with an introductory verse chorus from the singing of Capitan Baker, who learned this shanty from American “coloured” seamen called ‘Lemon’ Curtis, aboard the ship “Dovenby Hall”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 256).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 257).

The Record of the Hilo Boys Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hello Somebody - music notation

The full lyrics

Somebody’s knockin’at the garden gate,
– Hello, somebody, Hello!
It’s dirty Dick an’ his dirty mate,
– Hello, somebody, Hello!

* 2 *

Somebody’s knockin’ with a blody stick,
It’s Dirty Dick from New Brunswick,

* 3 *

Somebody’s knockin’ at the Gates o ‘Hell.
It’s Bully John an’ we knows him well.

* 4 *

Somebody’s knockin’ at the Gates o’ Heaven,
There wuz eight little nigger boys an’ now there’s seven.

* 5 *

Saint Peter’s knockin’ on the fo’c’sle door,
Guess I ain’t ready for the Golden Shore.

* 6 *

Somebody’s hangin’ on to this ‘ere line,
The blighter oughter rise an’ shine!

* 7 *

Haul away an’ make yer pay,
Haul away for Saccrappa Bay.

* 8 *

She’s knockin’ up the miles, reelin’ off the knots,
When we get to Boston, we’ll drink lots.

Related to this sea shanty

Hilo Come Down Below

Blow The Man Down – Terry Version

Ane Madam – Bergen Version (Norwegian)

Hilo Come Down Below

Interesting Facts about the Hilo Come Down Below

“Hilo Come Down Below” is another shanty with the word “Hilo”. This is a close related shanty to the “Hilo, Johnny Brown”. This is the halyard shanty, and Stan Hugill tells us is an obvious Negro origin. The only different version from this one in print we can find in Frank T Bullen’s book. This song Stan Hugill learned from his shipmate, great shantyman Harding Barbadian.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255, 256).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255, 256).

The Record of the Hilo Boys Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hilo Come Down Below - music notation

The full lyrics

Hilo Come Down Below

A Black Bird sat in a walnut tree,
– HI-lo, come DOWN below!
A ping-a-pong-in’ on his ol’ banje,
– HI-lo! come DOWN below!

* 2 *

Said the blackbird to the crow,
Come down below wid the whole ‘yer crew,

* 3 *

The crow flew down to Mobile Town,
Met a high yaller gal called Sally Brown.

* 4 *

Said the blacbird to the crow,
Don’t tell them yaller gals all yer know.

* 5 *

The blackbird sang, the crow said ‘caw’,
Gotter set this sail by half pas’ four.

* 6 *

The blackbird flapped his wings an’ crowed,
Why does a chicken cross the road?

* 7 *

If the sun don’ shine, then the hens don’ lay,
If we don’ haul, we git no pay.

* 8 *

One more pull, to ol’ crow cried,
We got to hurry for to catch the tide!

Related to this sea shanty

Blow The Man Down (IV – Doerflinger)

Hilo Boys Hilo

Blow The Man Down (V – Doerflinger)

Hilo Boys Hilo

Interesting Facts about the Hilo Boys Hilo

“Hilo Boys Hilo” is another shanty with the word “Hilo”. Negro origin shanty used at halyards. Like usually happen in Negro and cotton-Hoosier’s song, after the first few regulation verses shantyman would have to extemporize, since such shanties told no familiar story; However, in Stan Hugill’s version, which he has from Old Smith of Tobago, a one-time shipmate, a short tale is told.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255).

The Record of the Hilo Boys Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hilo Boys Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Hilo Boys Hilo

A black bird sat in a goose-berry tree,
– HI-lo, boys, HI-lo!
A ping-a-pon-gin’ on his ol’ ban-jee,
– Oh, Hilo, somebody Hilo!

* 2 *

The blackbird sang unto the crow,
I’ll soon be takin’ you in tow,

* 3 *

Said the blackbird to the crow,
Come down below with the whole ‘yer crew.

* 4 *

The crow flew down to Mobile Town,
Met a high yellar gal called Sally Brown.

* 5 *

Them yaller gals we do adore,
They’ll drink ye skint an’ ask for more.

* 6 *

The blackbird sang the crow said ‘caw’.
Got ter set this sail by half pas’ four.

* 7 *

High an’ dry we’ll hoist her high,
Hoist her high for a bulgine pie.

Related to this sea shanty

Hilo Johnny Brown

Blow The Man Down (E)

Blow The Man Down (F)

Hilo Johnny Brown

Interesting Facts about the Hilo Johnny Brown

I have great pleasure introduce to you the first song from Part Three of Stan Hugill’s “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, the “Hilo Johnny Brown” also known as “Stand to yer Ground!”. It opens a big group of the shanties with the word “Hilo” which depends on the context was port in the Hawaiian group, and, although occasionally referring by old shellbacks to this locality. Sometimes differently shanties it does refer to Peruvian nitrate port Ilo. “Hilo Johnny Brown” is the Negro origin halyard shanty and the usual verses of “Sally Brown” were used in this song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 254).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 254).

The Record of the Hilo Johnny Brown

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hilo Johnny Brown - music notation

The full lyrics

Hilo Johnny Brown

Saly she’m the gal that I love dear-ly,
– ‘WAY, sing, SALly! Ooh!
Saly she’m the gal that I love dear-ly,
– HIlo, Johnny Brown, STAND to yer ground!

* 2 *

Sally she’m the gal that I spliced nearly,
Her lips is red an’ her hair is curly,

* 3 *

Sally she’m a Badian beauty,
Sall-gal she’m know her dooty.

* 4 *

Sally she’m a bright mulatter,
She drinks rum an’ chaws terbacker.

* 5 *

Seven long years Ah courted Sally,
But Ah doan care ter dilly-dally,

(continue with other ‘Sally Brown’ verses)

* 6 *

Stand to yer ground an’ we’ll walk her up, boys,
Stand to yer ground an’ we’ll make a bit o’ noise.

* 7 *

Never mind the weather, boys, keep yer legs tergether,
Haul away, me bully boys, an’ burst the chafin’ leather.

* 8 *

The mate he goes aroun’, boys, dinging an’ a-dangin’,
Fair land o’ Caanan soon be a-showin’.

Related to this sea shanty

Ranzo Ray C

Blow The Man Down (C)

Blow The Man Down (D)