So Early In The Morning (B)

Interesting Facts about So Early In The Morning (B)

Miss C. F. Smith writes that So Early In The Morning (B), it was a favorite in the old Black-wallers. Its opening solo bears a striking resemblance to the shanty “Miss Lucy Long. Stan Hugill claims that is this version he took from Ezra Cobb, a bluenose (Nova Scotian) seamen of the old school, he says: this version was sung only at pumps, although he did say that “There used sometimes at caps’n.’

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 57).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 56).

The Record of the So Early In The Morning (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

so-early-in-the-morning-b musical notation

The full lyrics

So Early In The Morning (B)

The bottle-O, the bottle-O, the sailor loves The bottle-O,
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

* 2 *

A bottle o’ rum, a bottle o’ beer, a bottle o’ Red-eye whisky-O
So! early in the morning the sailor likes… his bottle O!

* 3 *

The baccy-O, terbaccy-O, the sailor loves his baccy-O.
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

* 4 *

A packet o’ shag, a packet o’ cut, a plug o’ hard terbaccy-O
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

* 5 *

The lassies-O, the maidens-O, the sailor loves the judies-O.
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

* 6 *

A lass from the ‘Pool, a gal from the Tyne, a chowlah so fine an’ dandy-O.
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

* 7 *

A bully rough-house, a bully rough-house, the sailor likes a rough-house-O
So! early in the morning the sailor likes… his bottle O!

* 8 *

A Tread on me coat, and all-hands-in, a bully good rough an’ tumble-O.
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

* 9 *

A sing-song-O, a sing-song-O, the sailor likes a sing-song-O.
So! early in the morning the sailor likes… his bottle O!

* 10 *

A drinkin’ song, a song o’ love, a ditty o’ seas and shipmatessing-song-O,
So! early in the morning the sailor loves… his bottle O!

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’ (A)

So Early In The Morning (A)

So Early In The Morning (C)

So Early In The Morning (A)

Interesting Facts about So Early In The Morning (A)

This is another shanty telling of Sailor’s shore amusements, it was used both for halyards and pumps. The first line is the chorus, sung as many shantymen sang the chorus of other shanties, as an introduction when they were in doubt as to whether a greenhorn crowd knew the refrain or not. This version is a Liverpool-Irish one.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 56).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 56).

The Record of the So Early In The Morning (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

so-early-in-the-morning-a musical notation

The full lyrics

So Early In The Morning ( A )

– So! early in the mornin: the sailor likes… his bottle O!

* 1 *

The mate was drunken’ and he went below to take a swig at his bottle O,
– So! early in the mornin: the sailor likes… his bottle O!

* 2 *

The bottle-O, the bottle-O, the sailor loves his bottle-O,

* 3 *

A bottle o’ rum, a bottle o’ gin, a bottle o’ irish whisky-O

* 4 *

The baccy-O, terbaccy-O, the sailor loves his baccy-O.

* 5 *

A packet o’ shag, a packet o’ cut, a plug o’ hard terbaccy-O

* 6 *

The lassies-O, the maidens-O, the sailor loves the judies-O.

* 7 *

A lass from the ‘Pool, a gal from the Tyne, a chowlah so fine an’ dandy-O.

* 8 *

A bully rough-house, a bully rough-house, the sailor likes a rough-house-O

* 9 *

A Tread on me coat, and all-hands-in, a bully good rough an’ tumble-O.

* 10 *

A sing-song-O, a sing-song-O, the sailor likes a sing-song-O.

* 11 *

A drinkin’ song, a song o’ love, a ditty o’ seas and shipmatessing-song-O,

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’ (A)

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

The Girl in Portland Street

Interesting Facts about The Girl in Portland Street

Another shanty from “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill, is named “The Girl in Portland Street”. Curious shanty related in theme to A-rovin’. Harlow gives us this chantey under the title: “Fal-de-all-day. This song is called “whistling chantey from the fact that the first refrain was sometimes whistled. According to Stan Hugill in sailors’ version was always sung at pumps, and in this tempo, I will sing this song (however Harlow states this shanty was often sung at the windlass while heaving up the anchor).

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 53).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 53, 54).

The Record of The Girl in Portland Street

Below is the text of the version, I will try to recreate: Lyrics from Shanties from the Seven Seas, by Stan Hugill page 54 and 55.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-girl-in-portland-street - musical notation

The full lyrics

The Girl in Portland Street

I met a gal in Portland Street,
– Fol-de-lol, fol-de-lol, fol-de-lol, lol day, (or else repeat solo with wistle)
I met a gal in Portland Street,
– With a fol-de-lol-day, fol-de-lol-day, fol-de-lol-lol-de, lol-de, lol-day!

* 2 *

This gal I met in Portland Street,
Was the sweetest gal I ever did meet.

* 3 *

Sez I, ‘Me gal, ,Ow do ye do?’
Sez she, ,The worse for seein’ of you.’

* 4 *

‘Now, miss,’ sez I, ‘I like yer style.’
Sez she, ‘Young man, just wait a while.’

* 5 *

‘Just wait until you try an’ play,
And then I’ll send ye on yer way.’

* 6 *

I took her hand into my own,
And we headed soon for her old home.

* 7 *

And in her room, not far away,
We drank until the break o’ day.

* 8 *

I pulled her down on my lap,
Sez she, ‘Young man, your face I’ll slap.’

* 9 *

On her ankle next I placed my hand,
Says she, for this, I will not stand.’

* 10 *

I pulled her dress above her knee,
Sez she, ‘Young man, please let me be.’

* 11 *

‘And why did I no further go?
Alas! her leg was cork, you know!’

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’ (A)

A -Rovin’ (B)

A- Rovin’ (C)

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

Go Roving (Norvegian)

Interesting Facts about the Go Roving

In a fine old Norwegian shanty book called Opsang fra Seilskibstiden —‘Shanties from the Sailing-Ship Days’— D. H. Brochmann gives a few stanzas of the English version of the Go Roving, several in Norwegian. This Norwegian version was composed by a Norwegian poet, Henrik Wergelands, a fine character who took many of the obscene shanties of his time and rewrote them, building his themes mainly around some famous ship.

In each case he rewrote enough stanzas for a long heave or hoist; in this version of A-rovin’ —Shanty for the Christiania Packet —he made sixteen verses. Most of his versions are patriotic and nostalgic.

After giving the first few stanzas of the usual English version, the text in Opsang explains: ‘. . . these first three verses only are decent. It is now preferable to continue with Wergeland’s version’!

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 48 – A-Rovin’ A).

The lyrics: “Brage og Idun, et nordisk Fjærdingårsskrift” by Frederik Barfod (Sommernummer 1841).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 52).

The Record of the Go Roving

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet) – Capstan Shanty

Nu muntres op saa mangt et Sind.
– Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!

Nu muntres op saa mangt et Sind.
Paketten er nu halet ind.
– I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

– go roving, go roving,
– Since rovin’s bin my ru-i-in,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’,
– With you fair maid.

* 2 *

Nu stiger Hjertet i vor Barm.
Med Styrke løfter sig vor Arm.

* 3 *

Nu ruller Blodet i vort Bryst.
Nu heise vi med Kraft og Lyst.

* 4 *

I Veiret Oxehov’det gaaer.
Paa Bryggen endnu flere staaer.

* 5 *

De undres hvad vel deri er:
om Porter eller Gingerbeer?

* 6 *

Men gid vi brygged Porter selv
af eget Malt og egen Elv!

* 7 *

Ja gid vi brygged selv vort Øl!
Og drak det saa i Krus af Sølv!

* 8 *

Saa drak vi og med bredfuldt Maal
Det gjæve gamle Norges Skaal.

* 9 *

Saa drak vi og med Velbehag
en Skaal for Norges røde Flag.

* 10 *

Saa drak vi til vi drak os mæt
en lystig Skaal for vor Paket.

* 11 *

Tilsidst vi letted paa vor Spunds;
og drak Kapteinens Skaal tilbunds.

* 12 *

Og altiblandt, med muntre Vers,
vi heise Baller under Mers.

* 13 *

Og Damen stryger strunk forbi.
Hun undres hvad vel er deri

* 14 *

Til Tjeneste, der er, Madam!
en Mængde fremmed Modenskram.

* 15 *

Men gid du gik — Hurra my boy!
i eget hjemmevirket Tøi!

* 16 *

Saa fik du før du gik herfra
et ærligmeent Matroshurra.

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’(A)

A-Rovin’ (A2)

A -Rovin’ (B)

A- Rovin’ (C)

A-Rovin’ (D)

A-Rovin’ (D)

Interesting Facts about the A-Rovin’ (D)

The following version of the A-Rovin’ (D) according to Stan Hugill’s Book is given only by Terry and Sharp, and is probably the older one – it has the jerkiness of all shanties which were sung at the earlier brake-pumps and lever windlasses.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 50, 51).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 50, 51).

The Record of the A-Rovin’ (D)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

a-rovin-d - sea shanty musical notation

The full lyrics

A-ROVIN’ ( C ) – Pump Shanty

In Amsterdam there lived a maid
– Bless you young women!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid
– Now mind what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid
An’ she was mistress of her trade
– I’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid

– A-rovin’, a-rovin’, since rovin’s bin me ru-i-in
– I’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid

* 2 *

I took this fair maid for a walk.
– Bless you, young women!
I took this fair maid for a walk.
– Now mind what I do say!
I took this fair maid for a walk,
An’ we had such a lovin’ talk.
– I’ll go no more, etc.

* 3 *

An’ didn’t I tell her stories true,
Of the gold we found in Timbuctoo.

* 4 *

But when she’d spent me bloomin’ screw,
She cut her cable an’ vanished too.

* 5 – Other stanzas with a genuine ring are: *

I met her walking on the Strand,
Dressed up for to beat the band.

* 6 *

In Number One New England Square,
Me Nancy Dawson she lives there.

* 7 *

This last ten months I’ve bin to sea,
Ah’ hell, this gal looked good to me.

Related to this sea shanty …

A-Rovin’ (A)

A-Rovin’ (A2)

A -Rovin’ (B)

A- Rovin’ (C)

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

A-Rovin’ (C)

Interesting Facts about the A-Rovin’ (C)

The first thing I want to tell you about A-Rovin’ (C), is the fact that most verses given in print have been camouflaged beyond all recognition (because they have been too bawdy). Also, other verses are far too sentimental for Sailor John to have sung them. The following version, which I picked up in Port Adelaide, South Australia, has a genuine ring to it. This too omits the ‘Mark well’, etc., refrain, but uses the full tune.

Therefore two verses that are difficult to bowdlerize have been omitted!

The following versions of A-Rovin’ (C), given only by Terry and Sharp, is probably the older one—it has the jerkiness of all shanties which were sung at the earlier brake pumps and lever windlasses.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 50).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 50).

The Record of the A-Rovin’ (C)

Still too fast tempo, maybe ok for the first 10 minutes to work on pumps. Lyrics from Shanties from the Seven Seas, by Stan Hugill.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

A-ROVIN’ ( C ) – Pump Shanty
(alternate titles: Amsterdam or The Maid of Amsterdam)

In Amsterdam there lived a maid
An’ she wuz tall an’ fair.
Her eyes wuz blue, her lips wuz red,

For Salt John’s money, O, she had -a flair.

– I’ll go no more a-ro-o-vin’ with you fair maid.

 A-rovin’, a-rovin’,
– Since rovin’s bin my ru-i-in,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’,
– With you fair maid.

* 2 *

One night I crept from my abode

But when it came to leavin’ her,
An’ I told her I must go,
She cried a bit, she cursed a bit,
An’ then she cried, ‘Here’s Holy Joe!’

* 3 *

The anchor’s up, our sails are set,
An’ we are homeward bound.
Another gal I never shall see,
Until we reach ol’ Plymouth Sound.

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’ (A)

A-Rovin’ (A2)

A -Rovin’ (B)

A-Rovin’ (D)

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

A-Rovin’ (A2)

Interesting Facts about the A-Rovin’ (A2)

W. B. Whall, Master Mariner in his “Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties(Glasgow, James Brown & Son, Publishers, 1910), mentioned is that: “The motive of this favorite sea song is very old indeed, and A-Rovin’ (A2) appears (in slightly varying forms) in many writings, e.g., in Thomas Heywood’s Rape of Lucrece (first performed in London in 1630).

Additionally worth noting, Stanley Slade with a male chorus sang A-Roving in the BBC recording 6018 made in Bristol on 2 July 1943. This track was included in 1955 in the “Columbia anthology The World Library of Folk and Primitive Music: England”, certainly one of the most beautiful, (from the musical point of view), performances of this song ever.

Is a version taken from “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill, name of the version is: A-Rovin’ (a), is printed on page 46 (US Edition published in 1994 by Mystic Seaport). But the beginning of this melody is from the first edition of the book from the beginning of page 50 (between versions b and c, ok I know it sounds complicated, haha but it’s true). W. B. Whall, Master Mariner in his “Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties(Glasgow, James Brown & Son, Publishers, 1910), mentioned is that: “The motive of this favorite sea song is very old indeed, and appears (in slightly varying forms) in many writings, e.g., in Thomas Heywood’s Rape of Lucrece (first performed in London in 1630).

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 48, 49).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 48, 49).

The Record of the A-Rovin’ (A2)

As far as I’m aware the record of this song sung by Stan Hugill didn’t survive. The oldest record I found is A-Rovin’ (Recorded 1947) by Leonard Warren.

… A-Rovin was originally sung at the pumps and old-fashioned windlass. In both labors – at the pump and at the windlass – two long leavers were worked up and down by the men: a back-breaking job. … Stan Hugill.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

NOTE! – this tempo is a little too quick for work on pumps, the next version will be slightly slower much closer to actual work on “Downton – pump”.

The musical notation

a-rovin-a2 - sea shanty musical notation

The full lyrics

A-ROVIN’ ( B ) – Pump Shanty
(alternate titles: Amsterdam or The Maid of Amsterdam)

In Amsterdam there lived a maid
And she was mistress of her trade
We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid
– A-rovin’, a-rovin’, since rovin’s bin me overthrow,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid

* 2 *

One night I crept from my abode
To meet this fair maid down the road.
We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you, fair maid.

– A-rovin’, a-rovin’, since rovin’s bin me overthrow,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid

* 3 *

I met this fair maid after dark,
An’ took her to her favourite park.

* 4 *

I took this fair maid for a walk,
An’ we had such a lovin’ talk.

* 5 *

I put me arm around her waist,
Sez she, ‘Young man, yer in great haste!’

* 6 *

I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, ‘Young man, yer rather free!’

* 7 *

I put me hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, ‘Young man, yer rather high!’

* 8 *

I towed her to the Maiden’s Breast,
From south the wind veered wes’sou’west [sou’sou’west].

* 9 *

An’ the eyes in her head turned east an’ west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol’ sea-chest.

* 10 *

We had a drink—of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

* 11 *

Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wus soft as silk
.

* 12 *

Her heart wuz poundin’ like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

* 13 *

We laid down on a grassy patch,
An’ I felt such a ruddy ass.

* 14 *

She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

* 15 *

She swore that she’d be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

* 16 *

In three weeks’ time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.

Related to this sea shanty …

A-Rovin’ (A)

A -Rovin’ (B)

A- Rovin’ (C)

A-Rovin’ (D)

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

A-Rovin’ (B)

Interesting Facts about A-Rovin’ (B)

At first, Anderson, the Scottish carpenter already mentioned, said that in his ship – one of Vickers’ big four-masters from Liverpool – the usual method of singing A-Rovin’ (B) was as follows.

Note the omission of the refrain “Mark well what I do say!”

Due to my research, I discover a big mismatch in speed on how the shanties are sung in nova days. So the first question is what type of pump has been used when sailors sang this sea shanty, Stan Hugill talks about the “Downton” pump, so I did research everywhere to find the movie showing sailors at work, and it was only one that looks sensible to me is the movie you can find on YouTube with the title “Traditional bilge pump worked on James Craig tall ship“.

To explain, In this type of pump such as A-Rovin’ (B), sailors installed on the ends of bars ropes (bell-rope), to make the job easier by taking more sailors involved in pumping. In this 0.25 min of this super unique movie, you can watch real pumping with bell ropes: bell ropes pumping work – this will be a template to me when I will sing all “Downton” Shanties such as “Lowlands” family, “Strike The Bell” and so on.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 49).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 48, 49).

The Record of the A-Rovin’ (B)

Afterward here record of this beautiful shanty, with a presentation to proxy actual work on the pump.

To conclude this version will be sung as exact as possible (probably forgotten decades ago), with tempo and way of singing pump shanty.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

a-rovin-b - sea shanty musical notation

The full lyrics

A-ROVIN’ ( B ) – Pump Shanty
(alternate titles: Amsterdam or The Maid of Amsterdam)

In Amsterdam there lived a maid
And she was mistress of her trade
We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid
– A-rovin’, a-rovin’, since rovin’s bin me overthrow,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid

* 2 *

One night I crept from my abode
To meet this fair maid down the road.
We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you, fair maid.

– A-rovin’, a-rovin’, since rovin’s bin me overthrow,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’ with you fair maid

* 3 *

I met this fair maid after dark,
An’ took her to her favourite park.

* 4 *

I took this fair maid for a walk,
An’ we had such a lovin’ talk.

* 5 *

I put me arm around her waist,
Sez she, ‘Young man, yer in great haste!’

* 6 *

I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, ‘Young man, yer rather free!’

* 7 *

I put me hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, ‘Young man, yer rather high!’

* 8 *

I towed her to the Maiden’s Breast,
From south the wind veered wes’sou’west [sou’sou’west].

* 9 *

An’ the eyes in her head turned east an’ west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol’ sea-chest.

* 10 *

We had a drink—of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

* 11 *

Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wus soft as silk
.

* 12 *

Her heart wuz poundin’ like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

* 13 *

We laid down on a grassy patch,
An’ I felt such a ruddy ass.

* 14 *

She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

* 15 *

She swore that she’d be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

* 16 *

In three weeks’ time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’ (A)

A-Rovin’ (A2)

A- Rovin’ (C)

A-Rovin’ (D)

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

A-Rovin’ (A)

Interesting Facts about the A-Rovin’ (A)

Source of the sea shanty

This is another sea shanty I do recreate here is the version I took from the book “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill, the name of the version of this shanty is “A-Rovin’ (A)”, which is printed on page 46 of the mentioned book (US Edition published in 1994 by Mystic Seaport).

W. B. Whall, Master Mariner in his “Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties(Glasgow, James Brown & Son, Publishers, 1910), mentioned is that: “The motive of this favorite sea song is very old indeed, and appears (in slightly varying forms) in many writings, e.g., in Thomas Heywood’s Rape of Lucrece (first performed in London in 1630).

About the title is worth mentioning that A-Rovin’ also is known under the title “Maid of Amsterdam”, the roots of this song are as old as the possible origin of this beautiful shanty, which is the narrative poem “The Rape of Lucrece” by Thomas Heywood, dated on 1630.

Distinguish record

Additionally worth noting, Stanley Slade with a male chorus sang A-Roving in the BBC recording 6018 made in Bristol on 2 July 1943. This track was included in 1955 in the “Columbia anthology The World Library of Folk and Primitive Music: England”, certainly one of the most beautiful, (from the musical point of view), performances of this song ever.

Additionally, as far as I’m aware, unfortunately for us, Stan Hugill did not leave us the record of this song. Also, the oldest record I found is A-Rovin’ (Recorded 1947) by Leonard Warren.

… As has been noted, A-Rovin was originally sung at the pumps and old-fashioned windlass. In both labors – at the pump and at the windlass – two long leavers were worked up and down by the men: a back-breaking job. … Stan Hugill.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 48, 49).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 48, 49).

The Record of the A-Rovin’ (A)

Afterward here record of this beautiful shanty, recorded by me on the 6th of June 2020, and this was my first conscious tryout of the sang shanty as authentically and genuinely as possible.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

a-rovin-a - sea shanty musical notation

The full lyrics

A-Rovin’ (A) – Pump Shanty

In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
– Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
An’ she wuz mistress of her trade,
– We’ll go no more a-ro-o-vin’ with you fair maid.

A-rovin’, a-rovin’,
– Since rovin’s bin my ru-i-in,
– We’ll go no more a-rovin’,
– With you fair maid.

* 2 *

One night I crept from my abode,
– Mark well what I do say!
One night I crept from my abode,
To meet this fair maid down the road.
– We’ll go no more a-ro-o-vin’ with you fair maid.

– A-rovin’, a-rovin’…

* 3 *

I met this fair maid after dark,
An’ took her to her favourite park.

* 4 *

I took this fair maid for a walk,
An’ we had such a lovin’ talk.

* 5 *

I put me arm around her waist,
Sez she, “Young man, yer in great haste!”

* 6 *

I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, “Young man, yer rather free!”

* 7 *

I put my hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, “Young man, yer rather high!”

* 8 *

I towed her to the Maiden’s Breast,
From south the wind veered wes’sou’west

* 9 *

An’ the eyes in her head turned east an’ west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol’ sea-chest.

* 10 *

We had a drink – of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

* 11 *

Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wuz soft as silk.

* 12 *

Her heart wuz poundin’ like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

* 13 *

We laid down on a grassy patch,
An’ I felt such a ruddy ass.

* 14 *

She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

* 15 *

She swore that she’d be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

* 16 *

In three weeks’ time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.

* 17 *

In a bloodboat Yank bound round Cape Horn,
Me boots an’ clothes wuz all in pawn.

* 18 *

Bound round Cape Stiff through ice an’ snow,
An’ up the coast to Callyo.

* 19 *

An’ then back to the Liverpool Docks,
Saltpetre stowed in our boots an’ socks.

* 20 *

Now when I got back home from sea,
A soger had her on his knee.

Related to this sea shanty

A-Rovin’ (A2)

A -Rovin’ (B)

A- Rovin’ (C)

A-Rovin’ (D)

Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)