Lowlands or My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

Interesting Facts about My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

This originally pumping shanty, My Dollar An’ A Half A Day was later used as windlass and capstan. This is the Southern States version, Bullen believes it to be of Negro origin, and Whall calls it’ American’, from the cotton ports. “Mr. Perring said this was a ‘typical’ (‘ti’ rhymes with ‘my’) Negro Chantey, sung by Negro sailors in the East India trade, in complaint at their being harder worked and lower-waged than white seamen. Doerflinger disagrees and thinks it is an English song, taken to the Gulf ports by the English and Irish pocket seamen who worked there loading cotton.

Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This “dead lover” pattern one I sing, of four is:
“Later southern States version”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a male”,
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
“The dead lover is a female”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 68, 69). The version I will try to recreate I heard on Stan Hugill’s album – “Aboard the Cutty Sark” (1979).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 68, 69).

The Record of the My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-or-my-dollar-an-a-half-a-day musical notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands (My Dollar An’ A Half A Day)

– Low-lands, Lowlands away my John
– Low-lands away, I heard them say,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 1 *

A dollar an’ a half a day is a (black man) nigers pay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I thought I heard out Old Man say,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 2 *

A white man’s pay is rather high.
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
A black man’s pay is rather low,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 3 *

Five dollars a day is a hoosier’s pay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
Five dollars a day is a hoosier’s pay,
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 4 *

A dollar an’ a half a day is mathlow’s pay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
A dollar an’ a half a day won’t pay my way.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 5 *

Ohwhat shall we poor shellbacks do?
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
We’ve got no money an’ we can’t git home.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 6 *

I packet me bag an’ I’m bound away,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I’m bound away for Mobile Bay.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 7 *

We’re bound away for Mobile Bay,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
We’re bound away at the break o’ day.
– My Dollar an’ a half a day.

* 8 *

Oh, say wuz ye never down in Mobile Bay?
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
A-screwin’ cotton all the day.
– My Dollar an’ a half, a day.

* 9 *

Oh, me poor ol’ mother, oh, she wrote to me,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
She wrote to me to come home from sea.
– My Dollar an’ a half, a day.

* 10 *

We’ll heave ‘er up from down below,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
Oh, heave ‘er up an’ away we’ll go!
– My .
..

* 11 *

Oh, I though I heard the Ol’ Man say,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
He’d give us rum three times a day.
– My .
..

* 12 *

I wish I had ten thousand pound,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I’d steer me ship for miles around.
– My .
..

* 13 *

I’d load her up with grub an’ gin,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
An’ stay in the port where we wuz in.
– My .
..

* 14 *

I’d stand ye drinks three times a day,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
An’ feel ye well am’ raise yer pay.
– My .
..

* 15 *

With a bully ship an’ a bully crew,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
An’ a bucko skipper for to kick her through.
– My .
..

* 16 *

Oh, I wished I wuz in Liverpool Town,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
With them Liverpool judies I’d dance around.
– My …

* 17 *

Wake up, yer bitch, an’ let us in,
– Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
Wake up, yer bitch, cos we want some gin.
– My …

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Away (B)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Away (B) originally a pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular.
Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.


This “dead lover” pattern one I sing, of four is:
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a female”,
“The dead lover is a male”
“Later southern States version”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 66). This version has also slightly different hours, I did change it just to seek of trying out some different.

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 67). This version has also slightly different hours, I did change it just to seek of trying out some different.

The Record of the Lowlands Away (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-away-b musical notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Away (B)

– Lowlaands, Lowlands, hurrah my Jo!
– Lowlands, high, Lowlands, alay!
– My Lowlands away!

* 1 *

I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– Low-lands, Lowlands, hurrah my Jo!
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– Lowlands, alay!

* 2 *

I dreamt I saw my own true love,
She flew to me like some young dove

* 3 *

This maid she stood close by my side,
All dressed in white like some fair bride.

* 4 *

She spoke in accents sweet an’ low.
I love you, dear, this well you know.’

* 5 *

And, then I sang in sweetest voice,
That song which made my heart rejoice.

* 6 *

Oh, Lowlands maids are fair an’ true,
This Lowlands maid she loves you too.

* 7 *

And Lowlands men are strong an’ brave:
The one I love sails o’er the wave.

* 8 *

I held her in my fond embrace,
And kissed her sweet an’ shinin’ face.

* 9 *

And-then awoke to her the cry,
‘Rouse out the watch, ho! watch ahoy!’

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Strangely Enough, c.F. Smith gives Lowlands Away (A) (ii) it as halyard shanty, It is maybe because it doesn’t have a grand chorus, and in Stans Hugill’s theory from -“The Bosuns Locker” book, is that four-line construction – two solos and two intermittent refrains (more details you can find there).

Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This “dead lover” pattern one I sing, of four is:
“The dead lover is a female”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a male”,
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
“Later southern States version”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 65).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 66, 67).

The Record of the Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-away-a-ii music notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

– Low-lands, Lowlands, away, my John,
– Lowlands away I heard them say,
– My Lowlands away.

* 1 *

I dreamed a dream the other night,
– Lowlands, Lowlands, away, my John.
My love she came dressed all in white,
– My Lowlands away.

* 2 *

I dreamed my love came in my sleep,
Her cheeks were wet, her eyes did weep.

* 3 *

She came to me as my best bride (at mt bed-side),
All dressed in white like some fair bride.

* 4 *

And bravely in her bosom fair,
A red, red rose did my love wear.

* 5 *

She made no sound-no word she said,
And then I knew my love was dead.

* 6 *

I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.

* 7 *

She waved her hand-she said goodbye,
I wiped the tear from out my eye.

* 8 *

And then awoke to hear the cry,
‘Oh, watch on deck, oh, watch ahoy!’

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Lowlands Away (B)

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Interesting Facts about Lowlands Away (A) (i)

Lowlands Away (A) (i) was originally a pumping shanty; also later used as a windlass and capstan shanty. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular. Terry, claims that after the China clipper era it was seldom heard.
Its “Dead Lover” theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.

This “dead lover” pattern one I sing of four is:
“The dead lover is a male”
another three patterns are:
“The dead lover is a female”,
“Sailor’s dream of his sweetheart”
“Later southern States version”

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 65).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 65, 66).

The Record of the Lowlands Away (A) (i)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

lowlands-away-a-i music notation

The full lyrics

Lowlands Away (A) (i)

– Low-lands Lowlands, away my John!
– Lowlands, Away I heard them say,
– [My] Lowlands, away!

* 1 *

I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– Lowlands , Lowlands, away my John!
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
– [My] Lowlands, away!

* 2 *

I dreamt I saw my own true love,
He stood so still, he did not move,

* 3 *

I knew my love was drowned and dead,
He stood so still, no word he said.

* 4 *

All dank his hair, all dim his eye,
I knew that he had said goodbye.

* 5 *

All green and wet with weeds so cold,
Around his form green weeds had hold.

* 6 *

I’m drowned in the Lowland Seas,’ he said,
‘Oh, you an’ I will ne’er be wed.’

* 7 *

I shall never kiss you more,’ he said,
‘Never kiss you more — for I am dead.’

* 8 *

I will cut my breasts until they bleed.’
His form had gone — in the green weed.

* 9 *

I will cut away my bonnie hair,
No other man will think me fair.’

* 10 *

I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.

* 11 *

My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,
My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,

Related to this sea shanty

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

Lowlands Away (A) (ii)

Lowlands Away (B)

The Lowlands Low (C)

Interesting Facts about The Lowlands Low (C)

The Lowlands Low (C) is a slightly more modern version This is much the same tune as Bullen Gives. In all three versions, the words are very similar. But the name of the ship differs widely; some versions give the “Gold China Tree”, or the “Marry Golden Tree”; others have the “Weep Willow Tree”, “Golden Willow Tree”, and “Sweet Trinitee”. Also, the pirate ship has various names: the “Turkish [or Spanish] Canoe”, the “Turkish Roveree”, and “Spanish Gahalee” being.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 64). The is sung as a pump shanty.

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63 width version modifications).

The Record of The Lowlands Low (C)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-lowlands-low-c musical notation

The full lyrics

The Lowlands Low (C)

Oh, there was a lofty ship boys, an’ she put aut to sea
An’ she goes by the name of the Golden Vanitee
An’ we feared she would be taken by a spanish piratee
– as we sailed along the lowlands, lowlands
– as we sailed along the lowlands low!

* 2 *

Oh, we had aboard o’ us a little cabin-boy
Who said, – “What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?”
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 3 *

‘Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I’ll give to thee galore,
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 4 *

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An’ he swam until he came to the rascal pirate’s side
He climbed on the deck an’ went below, by none was he espied
– And he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 5 *

He bore with his auger, he bored once an’ twice
And some were playin’ cards an’ some were playin’ dice
An’ water flowed in an’ dazzled their eyes
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 6 *

Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an’ some were playin’ dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin’ with their wives
An’ then he let the water in an’ put out all their lights
– And he sank her in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank her in the lowlands low!

* 7 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim o’er to the starboard side
Sayin’ – “Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide.”
“I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
– I wiill sink ye in the lowlands, lowlands
– I-will sink ye in the lowlands Low!

* 8 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin’ – “Shipmates take me up for I’m drowinin’ with the tide.”
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
– And they buried him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And they buried him in the lowlands low!

* 9 *

‘And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o’er him, and they dropped him in the tide
– And they sailed from the lowlands, lowlands
– And they sailed from the lowlands low!

* 10 *

Here’s a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
– And to leave him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And to leave him in the lowlands low!

Related to The Lowlands Low (C)

A-Rovin’ (A)

So Early In The Morning (B)

So Early In The Morning (C)

The Lowlands Low (B)

Interesting Facts about The Lowlands Low (B)

This version of The Lowlands Low (B), Stan Hugill had from his shipmate Jack Birch of Plymouth. This song is known as “Lowlands”, “The Lowland Sea”, “The Golden Vanitee”, or “The Lowlands Low” and seems to have been based on a ballad of the seventeenth century entitled “Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing in the Lowlands”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 64).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63).

The Record of The Lowlands Low (B)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-lowlands-low-b musical notation

The full lyrics

The Lowlands Low (B)

There was a lofty ship boys, an’ she put aut to sea
An’ she goes by the name of the Golden Vanitee
An’ we thought she would be taken by the spanish piratee
– as we sailed along the lowlands, lowlands
– as we sailed along the lowlands low!

* 2 *

Oh, we had aboard o’ us a little cabin-boy
Who said, – “What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?”
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 3 *

‘Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I’ll give to thee galore,
– If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
– If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

* 4 *

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An’ he swam until he came to the rascal pirate’s side
He climbed on the deck an’ went below, by none was he espied
– And he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 5 *

He bore with his auger, he bored once an’ twice
And some were playin’ cards an’ some were playin’ dice
An’ water flowed in an’ dazzled their eyes
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands, lowlands
– An’ he sank’em in the lowlands low!

* 6 *

Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an’ some were playin’ dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin’ with their wives
An’ then he let the water in an’ put out all their lights
– And he sank her in the lowlands, lowlands
– And he sank her in the lowlands low!

* 7 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim o’er to the starboard side
Sayin’ – “Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide.”
“I will ink ye, I will kill ye if ye claim my child as bride,
– Ii will sink ye in the lowlands, lowlands
– I will sink ye in the lowlands Low!

* 8 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin’ – “Shipmates take me up for I’m drowinin’ with the tide.”
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
– And they buried him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And they buried him in the lowlands low!

* 9 *

‘And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o’er him, and they dropped him in the tide
– And they sailed from the lowlands, lowlands
– And they sailed from the lowlands low!

* 10 *

Here’s a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
– And to leave him in the lowlands, lowlands
– And to leave him in the lowlands low!

Related to this sea shanty

The Lowlands Low (A)

California

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

The Lowlands Low (A)

Interesting Facts about The Lowlands Low (A)

The lilt of the word ‘Lowlands’ seemed to have a fascination for the shantyman and sailor in general. A very ancient song of the sea sings of the Lowlands of Holland, those of Scottland, and even the Lowlands of Virginia were all woven into the songs of the shantyman. Stan Hugill mentioned that Capitan Davis (“Sailors’ Songs and Shanties” – 1887) gives it as a shanty, but Stan Hugill and many of his shipmates have sung this old song at both capstan and pumps.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63). I will try to recreate is capstan, and I heard it on Stan Hugill’s album – “A Salty Fore Topman” (1989).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 62, 63).

The Record of The Lowlands Low (A)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-lowlands-low-a musical notation

The full lyrics

The Lowlands Low (A)

There once was a skipper who was boastin’ on the quay,
Oh, I have a ship and a gallant ship is she,
Of all the ships I know. She is far the best to me,
an’ she’s sailing in the Low-lands, Low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, she’s sailing in the, Lowlands Low!

* 2 *

Oh, I had her built in the North a-counterie,
And I have her christened The “Golden Vanitee”.
I armed her and I manned her an’ I sent her off to sea
And she’s sailing in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and she’s sailing in the.
..

* 3 *

Then up spoke a sailor who had just returned from sea
‘Oh, I wuz aboard of the “Golden Vanitee”
When she wuz held in chase by a Spanish piratee
And we sank her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and we sank her in the.
..

* 4 *

Oh, we had aboard o’ us a little cabin-boy
Who said, – “What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?”
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
If ye sink her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, if ye sink her in the.
..

* 5 *

‘Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I’ll give to thee galore,
If ye sink her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low
lands, Lowlands, if ye sink her in the...

* 6 *

So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An’ he swam until he came to the rascal pirate’s side
He climbed on the deck an’ went below, by none was he espied
And he sank’em in the low
lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and he sank’em in the.
..

* 7 *

He bore with his auger, he bored once an’ twice
And some were playin’ cards an’ some were playin’ dice
An’ water flowed in an’ dazzled their eyes
An’ he sank’em in the low
lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, an’ he sank’em in the.
..

* 8 *

Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an’ some were playin’ dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin’ with their wives
An’ then he let the water in an’ put out all their lights
And he sank her in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and he sank her in the.
..

* 9 *

Then the cabin-boy did swim o’er to the starboard side
Sayin’ – “Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide.”
“I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
I will sink ye in the low-lands, low.”
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, I will sink ye in the.
..

Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin’ – “Shipmates take me up for I’m drowinin’ with the tide.”
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
And they buried him in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and they buried him in the

* 11 *

‘And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o’er him, and they dropped him in the tide
And they sailed from the low-lands, low.
– In the Low-lands, Lowlands, and they sailed from the

* 12 *

Here’s a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
And to leave him in the low-lands, low.
– In the Low
lands, Lowlands, and to leave him in the ...

Related to Larry Marr …

A Long Time Ago (C)

The Lowlands Low (B)

California

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

The Five-Gallon Jar

Interesting Facts about The Five-Gallon Jar

This version of The Five-Gallon Jar is a forebitter, (Only the first verse and all choruses are Hugill’s version), which Stan Hugill took from old Irish Sailor Paddy Delaney. We see the story of Jack Ratcliffe and Marry Ann, a couple who was crimps and took profit from the “Shanghaying” sailors.
Shanghaiing or crimping is the practice of kidnapping people to serve as sailors by coercive techniques such as trickery, intimidation, or violence. Those engaged in this form of kidnapping were known as crimps.

The source of this forebitter

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 61).

The lyrics: The first full verse and all Choruses come from: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 61). To make the song story complete, and give it a sensible length I added other 3 verses from (Doerflinger – ‘Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman’ – p111) Doerflinger’s version of “The Big Five-Gallon Jar” comes from Capitan Henry E. Burke.

To keep the consistency of the song I replaced Doerflinger verses I replaced the original wife’s name from “Caroline” into Hugill’s “Mary Ann”.

The Record of The Five-Gallon Jar

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-five-gallon-jar musical notation

The full lyrics

The Five-Gallon Jar

In Liverpool there lived a man, Jack Ratcliffe was his name
An’in the days of the Cape Horn Trade, he played the Shanghai Game,
His wife’s name was Mary Ann, sailors knew both near an’far,
an’ when they played the Shanghai Game, They used the big stone Jar,

– In The Old Virginia Lowlands, Lowlands Low
– In The Old Virginia Lowlands Low.

* 2 *

There were drunkards in the corner and bummers at the bar
And [Mary Ann]Caroline was supplying them with a big five-gallon jar

……………
……………

* 3 *

Said old Jack to old [Mary Ann]Caroline, I’ll tell you what we’ll do,
There’s a ship lying down to McKinnon’s Wharf; I think she wants a crew.
We’ll go down around the corners to get some drunken tars
We’ll shanghai them away out of Liverpool Bay with a big five gallon jar.

* 4 *

So Jack and Cal[Ann] they worked their game when the ships signed on their tars,
Skys’l Jack and Pete and Bowline Bill helped to judge old Cal’s five gallon jar.
Now we’ll bid adieu to Cal and Jack and set our sails for ports afar
Dear Shanghai Cal, we’ll all come back, and sample Jack’s five-gallon jar.

Related to this Forebitter

Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Susannavisan

Larry Marr

Interesting Facts about Larry Marr

Worth noting Larry Marr also has known as also called as “Five Gallon Jar”. This is the capstan shanty and at the pumps sometimes. In the chorus it is related to the “short refrain” version of “The Limejuice Ship”, this version was taken by Stan Hugill from Irish Sailor, Paddy Delaney, and it’s pretty certain that is of Irish origin.

Shanghaiing or crimping is the practice of kidnapping people to serve as sailors by coercive techniques such as trickery, intimidation, or violence. Those engaged in this form of kidnapping were known as crimps.

The verb “shanghai” joined the lexicon with “crimping” and “sailor thieves” in the 1850s, possibly because Shanghai was a common destination for ships with abducted crews. The term has since expanded to mean “kidnapped” or “induced to do something by means of fraud”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 60). I will sing this song as a capstan shanty. And try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill’s version from the album “Shanties From The Seven Seas” (1962), with The York & Albany Crew.

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 60).

The Record of the Larry Marr

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

larry-marr musical notes

The full lyrics

Larry Marr

There wuz five or six old drunken shellbacks standin’ before the bar
An’ Larry he wuz servin’ them from a big five-gallon jar

– Then hoist up yer flag, long may it wave
– Long may it lead us to the glory or the grave
– Steady boys steady, we’ll sound this Jubilee
– For Babylon’s a fallen an’ the Diggers are set free!

* 2 *

In Larry’s place way on the coast there lived old Larry Marr
Missus an’ Larry did employ such a big five-gallon jar.

* 3 *

The pair they played the Shanghai game, wuz known both near an’ far’
They never missed a lucky chance to use the five-gallon jar.

* 4 *

A hell-ship she wuz short o’ hands, o’ full red-blooded tars,
Missus an’ Larry would prime the beer in their ol’ five-gallon jar.

* 5 *

Shellbacks an’ farmers jist the same sailed into Larry Marr’s,
And sailed away around the Horn, helped by the five-gallon jar.

* 6 *

In ‘Frisco town their names is known, as is the Cape Horn Bar,
An’ the dope they serve out to ol’ Jack, from the big five-gallon jar.

* 7 *

From the Barbary Coast steer clear, me boys, an’ from ol’ Larry Marr,
Or else damn soon shanghaied ye’ll be by Larry’s five-gallon jar.

* 8 *

Shanghaied away in a skys’l-ship around Cape Horn so far,
Goodbye to all the boys an’ girls an’ Larry’s five-gallon jar.

(Verses 1&7 have the first tune – rest have the second tune)

Related to Larry Marr

A Long Time Ago (C)

California

Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus)

Interesting Facts about The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus)

The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus) was often used at pumps and sometimes at the capstan, but it is forebitter really. This version is sung to a similar tune for verses as the “long chorus” version, but with five verses, the fifth one being the long chorus. And the chorus however is shorter.

The source of this forebitter

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 58, 59).

The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 58, 59).

The Record of The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus)

I will sing and play this song as a forebitter.

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

the-limejuice-ship-short-chorus music notation

The full lyrics

The Limejuice Ship (Short Chorus)

Now, if ye want a merchant ship to sail the sea at large
Ya’ll not have any trouble if ye have a good discharge,
Signed by the Board o’ Trade an’ ev’rything exact,
For there’s nothin’ done on a Limejuice ship contrary to the Act.

– Shout, boys, shout! For I tell you it’s a fact
– There’s nothin’ done on a Limejuice ship contrary to the Act.

* 2 *

Now when ye join a merchant ship ye’ll hear yer Articles read.
They’ll tell ye of yer beef an’pork, yer butter an’ yer bread,
Yer sugar, tea an’ coffee, boys, yer peas an’ beans exact,
Yer limejuice an’ vinegar, boys, according to the Act.

* 3 *

No watch an’ watch the first day out, according to the Act.
Ten days out we all lay aft to get our limejuice whack.
Fetch out her handy billy, boys, and clap it on the tack,
For we gonna set the mains’l, oh, according to the Act.

* 4 *

Its up the deck, me bully boys, with many a curse we go,
Awaiting to hear eight bells struck that we might go below.
Eight bells is struck, the watch is called, the log is hove exact;
Relieve the wheel an’ go below, according to the Act.

* 5 *

So haul, boys, yer weather main brace an’ ease a-way yer lee
Hoist jibs an’ tops’ls lads an’ let the ship go free,
Hurrah, boys, hurrah! We’ll sing this Jubilee,
Damn an bugger the Navy, boys, A merchant ship for me!

Related to this Forebitter

The Five-Gallon Jar

The Gals O’ Dublin Town (A)

Susannavisan