Shallow Brown B

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown B

Shallow Brown B is a usual version of the general family of the shanties called “Shallow Brown”. At the beginning life of this song, it was used as a pump shanty. As the age of sails progressed, in the late days this song was usually sung at halyards. Here version of what Stan Hugill has heard from Harding Barbadian. I will reconstruct this song as a halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 258).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 258).

The Record of the Shallow Brown B

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown B - music notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown B

Oh! Shallow in the mornin’,
– SHALlow, oh, SHALlow Brown!
Just as the day was dawnin’,
– SHALlow, oh, SHALlow Brown!

* 2 *

She is a bright mulatter,
She hails from Cincinatter

* 3 *

Come put me clothes in order,
The packet sails termorrer.

* 4 *

Once ye wuz sweet and cherry,
But now ye are contrary.

* 5 *

For ye are fat an’ lazy,
Ye nearly drive me crazy.

* 6 *

My half-pay ye’ve spent like chaff,
Ye’d like the other half.

* 7 *

Ye boozed me pay away,
But ye’ve had yer last pay-day.

* 8 *

The packet sails termorrer,
I’ll leave yer without sorrer.

* 9 *

Me clothes are all in pawn,
I’m bound around the Horn.

* 10 *

She won’t miss me when I’ve gone,
She’ll hook some other bum.

Related to this sea shanty

Hello Somebody

Blow Boys Blow (A)

Blow Boys Blow (B)

Shallow Brown A (Sentimental)

 by Jerzy Brzezinski

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown A (Sentimental)

Shallow Brown A (Sentimental) is a usual version of the general family of the shanties called “Shallow Brown”. At the beginning life of this song, it was used as a pump shanty. As the age of sails progressed, in the late days this song was usually sung at halyards, William Doerflinger give it as being used to bowse down tack and sheets. I will reconstruct this song as a pump shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 258).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 258, 259).

The Record of the Shallow Brown A (Sentimental)

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown A (Sentimental) - music notation.

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown A (Sentimental)

– Och! Shallow, Och! Shallow Brown!

Oh! Shallow in the mornin’,
– Och! Shallow, Och! Shallow Brown!
Just as the day was dawnin’,
– Och! Shallow, Och! Shallow Brown!

* 2 *

She is a bright mulatter,
She hails from Cincinatter

* 3 *

Come put me clothes in order,
The packet sails termorrer.

* 4 *

I’m bound away to leve yer,
I never will deceive yer.

* 5 *

I long ter look upon yer,
I spend me money on yer,

* 6 *

Ye are me only treasure,
I love ye to full measure.

* 7 *

The packet sails termorrer,
I’ll leave ye with much sorrer.

* 8 *

In the cradle is my baby,
I want no other lady.

* 9 *

My wife an’ baby grieves me,
‘Tis pain for me ter leave ye.

* 10 *

Be on the pier ter meet me,
With kisses I will greet thee.

* 11 *

Goin’ away termorrer,
Bound away termorrer.

Related to this sea shanty

Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp

Mister Stormalong (A1)

Stormy Along, John

Shallow Brown A

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown A

Shallow Brown A is a usual version of the general family of the shanties called “Shallow Brown”. At the beginning life of this song, it was used as a pump shanty. According to Stan Hugill, this song has a West Indian origin, some of the shantymen pronounced the refrain as “Challo Brown” – “Challo” was a west Indian word Carib extraction meaning a “half-castle”, and it was heard this song, as far as the ports of Chile. I will reconstruct this song as a pump shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 258).
The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 258).

The Record of the Shallow Brown A

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown A - musical notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown A

– Och! Shallow, Och! Shal-low Brown!

Oh! Shallow in the mornin’,
– Och! Shallow, Och! Shal-low Brown!
Just as the day was dawnin’,
– Och! Shallow, Och! Shal-low Brown!

* 2 *

She is a bright mulatter,
She hails from Cincinatter

* 3 *

Come put me clothes in order,
The packet sails termorrer.

* 4 *

Once ye wuz sweet and cherry,
But now ye are contrary.

* 5 *

For ye are fat an’ lazy,
Ye nearly drive me crazy.

* 6 *

My half-pay ye’ve spent like chaff,
Ye’d like the other half.

* 7 *

Ye boozed me pay away,
But ye’ve had yer last pay-day.

* 8 *

The packet sails termorrer,
I’ll leave yer without sorrer.

* 9 *

Me clothes are all in pawn,
I’m bound around the Horn.

* 10 *

She won’t miss me when I’ve gone,
She’ll hook some other bum.

Related to this sea shanty

Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp

Mister Stormalong (A1)

Stormy Along, John

Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp

Interesting Facts about the Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp

Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp version, this version in fact has the solo words from “Blow, Boys, Blow”, and the solo tune from “Hilo, Boys, Hilo”. Stan Hugill gives us only a sample of this song with one chorus and first stanza so the other five verses I get from Cecil Sharp’s “English Folk Chanteys” (1914), a song with lyrics and music notation can be found on page 35. Sharp’s description of this song from page 70 reveals us couple more details than Stan Hugill. So first it says:
“British ships, unlike American, always carried limejuice ; hence the British sailor was nicknamed ” a limejuicer ” by his American comrades.”
Also, the song has been collected by Cecil Sharp from a really famous shantyman: Mr. John Short, at Watchet. Because Cecil Sharp refers to this version, to the Ferris Tozer’s version from “Sailors Songs or Chanteys” (3rd Edition) – (1906), song number 43, page 80, and it is in chapter “Songs For Pumping The Ship Out”, it will be reconstructed as the pump shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 35).
The lyrics: English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914) (1st ed: p 35).
Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 257).

The Record of the Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Shallow Brown - Cecil Sharp - music notation

The full lyrics

Shallow Brown – Cecil Sharp

– Shalow O, Shalow Brown, Shalow O, Shalow Brown,

A yankee ship came down the river;
– Shalow O, Shalow Brown.
A yankee ship came down the river;
– Shalow O, Shalow Brown.

* 2 *

And who you thing was master of her?
And who you thing was master of her?

* 3 *

A Yankee mate and a lime-juice skipper.
A Yankee mate and a lime-juice skipper.

* 4 *

And what do you think they had for dinner ?
And what do you think they had for dinner ?

* 5 *

A parrot’s tail and a monkey’s liver.
A parrot’s tail and a monkey’s liver.

Related to this sea shanty

Well Ranzo Way

The Lowlands Low (C)

Lowlands or My Dollar An’ A Half A Day

Hello Somebody

Interesting Facts about the Hello Somebody

“Hello Somebody” is a halyard shanty related to the “Hilo Come Down Below” and “Hilo Boys Hilo”. Stan Hugill’s description of this shanty is quite interesting so first he says, that Captain J. P. Parker it writes a verse of this shanty on his “Log of limejuicer” of the American ship “Tusitalia”, on page 40. Stan Hugill’s version comes from Harding Barbadian who told him that was very popular in ships with “coloured” crews. Also, William Main Doerflinger in his book gives a three-verse example of this song, with an introductory verse chorus from the singing of Capitan Baker, who learned this shanty from American “coloured” seamen called ‘Lemon’ Curtis, aboard the ship “Dovenby Hall”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 256).
The lyrics: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 257).

The Record of the Hilo Boys Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hello Somebody - music notation

The full lyrics

Somebody’s knockin’at the garden gate,
– Hello, somebody, Hello!
It’s dirty Dick an’ his dirty mate,
– Hello, somebody, Hello!

* 2 *

Somebody’s knockin’ with a blody stick,
It’s Dirty Dick from New Brunswick,

* 3 *

Somebody’s knockin’ at the Gates o ‘Hell.
It’s Bully John an’ we knows him well.

* 4 *

Somebody’s knockin’ at the Gates o’ Heaven,
There wuz eight little nigger boys an’ now there’s seven.

* 5 *

Saint Peter’s knockin’ on the fo’c’sle door,
Guess I ain’t ready for the Golden Shore.

* 6 *

Somebody’s hangin’ on to this ‘ere line,
The blighter oughter rise an’ shine!

* 7 *

Haul away an’ make yer pay,
Haul away for Saccrappa Bay.

* 8 *

She’s knockin’ up the miles, reelin’ off the knots,
When we get to Boston, we’ll drink lots.

Related to this sea shanty

Hilo Come Down Below

Blow The Man Down – Terry Version

Ane Madam – Bergen Version (Norwegian)

Hilo Come Down Below

Interesting Facts about the Hilo Come Down Below

“Hilo Come Down Below” is another shanty with the word “Hilo”. This is a close related shanty to the “Hilo, Johnny Brown”. This is the halyard shanty, and Stan Hugill tells us is an obvious Negro origin. The only different version from this one in print we can find in Frank T Bullen’s book. This song Stan Hugill learned from his shipmate, great shantyman Harding Barbadian.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255, 256).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255, 256).

The Record of the Hilo Boys Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hilo Come Down Below - music notation

The full lyrics

Hilo Come Down Below

A Black Bird sat in a walnut tree,
– HI-lo, come DOWN below!
A ping-a-pong-in’ on his ol’ banje,
– HI-lo! come DOWN below!

* 2 *

Said the blackbird to the crow,
Come down below wid the whole ‘yer crew,

* 3 *

The crow flew down to Mobile Town,
Met a high yaller gal called Sally Brown.

* 4 *

Said the blacbird to the crow,
Don’t tell them yaller gals all yer know.

* 5 *

The blackbird sang, the crow said ‘caw’,
Gotter set this sail by half pas’ four.

* 6 *

The blackbird flapped his wings an’ crowed,
Why does a chicken cross the road?

* 7 *

If the sun don’ shine, then the hens don’ lay,
If we don’ haul, we git no pay.

* 8 *

One more pull, to ol’ crow cried,
We got to hurry for to catch the tide!

Related to this sea shanty

Blow The Man Down (IV – Doerflinger)

Hilo Boys Hilo

Blow The Man Down (V – Doerflinger)

Hilo Boys Hilo

Interesting Facts about the Hilo Boys Hilo

“Hilo Boys Hilo” is another shanty with the word “Hilo”. Negro origin shanty used at halyards. Like usually happen in Negro and cotton-Hoosier’s song, after the first few regulation verses shantyman would have to extemporize, since such shanties told no familiar story; However, in Stan Hugill’s version, which he has from Old Smith of Tobago, a one-time shipmate, a short tale is told.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 255).

The Record of the Hilo Boys Hilo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hilo Boys Hilo - music notation

The full lyrics

Hilo Boys Hilo

A black bird sat in a goose-berry tree,
– HI-lo, boys, HI-lo!
A ping-a-pon-gin’ on his ol’ ban-jee,
– Oh, Hilo, somebody Hilo!

* 2 *

The blackbird sang unto the crow,
I’ll soon be takin’ you in tow,

* 3 *

Said the blackbird to the crow,
Come down below with the whole ‘yer crew.

* 4 *

The crow flew down to Mobile Town,
Met a high yellar gal called Sally Brown.

* 5 *

Them yaller gals we do adore,
They’ll drink ye skint an’ ask for more.

* 6 *

The blackbird sang the crow said ‘caw’.
Got ter set this sail by half pas’ four.

* 7 *

High an’ dry we’ll hoist her high,
Hoist her high for a bulgine pie.

Related to this sea shanty

Hilo Johnny Brown

Blow The Man Down (E)

Blow The Man Down (F)

Hilo Johnny Brown

Interesting Facts about the Hilo Johnny Brown

I have great pleasure introduce to you the first song from Part Three of Stan Hugill’s “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, the “Hilo Johnny Brown” also known as “Stand to yer Ground!”. It opens a big group of the shanties with the word “Hilo” which depends on the context was port in the Hawaiian group, and, although occasionally referring by old shellbacks to this locality. Sometimes differently shanties it does refer to Peruvian nitrate port Ilo. “Hilo Johnny Brown” is the Negro origin halyard shanty and the usual verses of “Sally Brown” were used in this song.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 254).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 254).

The Record of the Hilo Johnny Brown

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Hilo Johnny Brown - music notation

The full lyrics

Hilo Johnny Brown

Saly she’m the gal that I love dear-ly,
– ‘WAY, sing, SALly! Ooh!
Saly she’m the gal that I love dear-ly,
– HIlo, Johnny Brown, STAND to yer ground!

* 2 *

Sally she’m the gal that I spliced nearly,
Her lips is red an’ her hair is curly,

* 3 *

Sally she’m a Badian beauty,
Sall-gal she’m know her dooty.

* 4 *

Sally she’m a bright mulatter,
She drinks rum an’ chaws terbacker.

* 5 *

Seven long years Ah courted Sally,
But Ah doan care ter dilly-dally,

(continue with other ‘Sally Brown’ verses)

* 6 *

Stand to yer ground an’ we’ll walk her up, boys,
Stand to yer ground an’ we’ll make a bit o’ noise.

* 7 *

Never mind the weather, boys, keep yer legs tergether,
Haul away, me bully boys, an’ burst the chafin’ leather.

* 8 *

The mate he goes aroun’, boys, dinging an’ a-dangin’,
Fair land o’ Caanan soon be a-showin’.

Related to this sea shanty

Ranzo Ray C

Blow The Man Down (C)

Blow The Man Down (D)

Well Ranzo Way

Interesting Facts about the Well Ranzo Way

“Well Ranzo Way” is another shanty that mentions legendary sailor hero Ranzo. This shanty was also known as “The Wild Goose Shanty”, “Sing Hilo” or ” Huckleberry Hunting”. It was a kinda universal shanty, so it was sung at windlass or capstan, but Doerflinger it gives as a Halyards and pumps. Stan Hugill doesn’t state what his version is. I will reconstruct this song as a pump shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 249, 250).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 249, 250).

The Record of the Well Ranzo Way

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Well Ranzo Way - music notation

The full lyrics

Well Ranzo Way

Ooh, I’m shantyman of the warkin!. party,
– Timme WAY, timme hay, timme HEE, ho, hay!
So sing lads, pull lads so strong an .. hearty,
– An’ SING, Hilo me RANZO way!

* 2 *

I’m shantyman of the Wild Goose nation,
Got maid that I left on the big plantation,

* 3 *

Oh, the sassiest gal o’ that Wild Goose nation,
Is her that I left on the big plantation.

* 4 *

Oh, the boys an’ the gals went a chuckleberry huntin’,
The gals began to cry an’ the boys the dowsed their buntin’

* 5 *

Then a little gal ran off an’ a little boy ran arter,
The little gal fell down an’ he saw her little garter.

* 6 *

Said he, ‘I’ll be yer beau, if ye’ll have me for yer feller,’
But the little gal said, ‘No, ‘cos me sweetheart’s Jackie Miller.’

* 7 *

But he took her on his knee, an’ he kissed her right an’ proper,
She kissed him back agen, an’ he didn’t try to sto-o-p’ er.

* 8 *

An’ then he put his arm all around her tight an’ waspy waist,
Sez she, ‘Young man, you’re shown’ much too great a haste!’

Related to this sea shanty

Die Gute Alte Brigg (German)

So Early In The Morning (A)

So Early In The Morning (B)

Ranzo Ray C

Interesting Facts about the Ranzo Ray C

Ranzo Ray is one of the shanties with the word Ranzo in chorus. The seamen what Stan Hugill learned this song from said it was a hauling song. Stan Hugill thinks it was also singing at the capstan but was much more popular as a halyard song.
This version Stan Hugill learned from Harding Barbadian, he also informed us about this version was used as the halyard shanty.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 249). I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill’s version from the album “Shanties From The Seven Seas” (1962), with The York & Albany Crew.

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 249).

The Record of the Ranzo Ray C

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Ranzo Ray C - music notation

The full lyrics

Ranzo Ray C

We’re homeward bound from China, oh, aboard a Limey Liner –,
– RANzo, Ranzo, AWAY, a way!
We’re gettin’ out our long tall blues ter waltz the gals a -round
– Timme HI-lo, me Ranzo RAY!

* 2 *

We’ve ploughed the whole world over an’ now soon we’ll be off Dover.
We’ve ploughed the over, like a proper deepsea rover,

* 3 *

We’ll pass the cliffs of Dover, oh, an’ soon we’ll be in clover,
We’ll anchor in the Downs, for we’re bound for London Town.

* 4 *

We’re loaded down with courios from China an’ the Indias,
We’ll soon be seein’ all the gals, the gals we do adore.

* 5 *

We’ll drink an’ have our fun, sez every jolly Jonny,
The gals are waitin’ on the pier – the soon will have our money.

Related to this sea shanty

Ranzo Ray B

Where Am I To Go M’ Johnnies?

Blow The Man Down (B2 – second method)