Reuben Ranzo – Patterson version

Interesting Facts about the Reuben Ranzo – Patterson version

Now, Reuben Ranzo – Patterson version is a shanty built around the dirtiest “sailor” who ever shipped – Reuben Ranzo. This Halyard shanty was one of the most rousing of all of the halyard shanties. This shanty due to the some of the themes was very popular amongst whalers.
Again as Stan Hugill mentioned, if we talk about the most unusual version of any shanty we know that will be usually Patterson’s version, the refrains of his shanties in the main being longer than those normally used, and he also has a trick of putting short refrains where normally they don’t exist. So yes, reconstructing this shanty will be a really difficult task, and for one hundred percent I’m sure from the time of the published Patterson book, there is no record of this shanty surviving. During the reconstruction of this sea shanty, first of all, I will follow the most faithful reconstruction of this shanty in terms of its usefulness as a halyard shanty.
This version is given to us by J. E. Patterson in “The Sea’s Anthology” 1913, labeled this song as ‘hoisting’.

The source of the Reuben Ranzo – Patterson version

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 240).

The lyrics:  “The Sea’s Anthology” by J. E. Patterson (1913).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 242).

The Record of the Reuben Ranzo – Patterson version

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The full lyrics

Reuben Ranzo

Sing a song of Ranzo, boys, sing—
– RANZO, boys, RANZO!
Sing a song of Ranzo, boys, sing—
– SING a song of RANZO!

* 2 *

O-o, you know my Ruben Ranzo—
O-o, you know my Ruben Ranzo—

* 3 *

Ranzo took a notion to sail upon the ocean —
Ranzo took a notion to sail upon the ocean —

* 4 *

He was a New York tailor, thought he’d be a sailor —
He was a New York tailor, thought he’d be a sailor —

* 5 *

So he shipped himself on a Yankee whaler—
So he shipped himself on a Yankee whaler—

* 6 *

She sailed away in a whistling breeze—
She sailed away in a whistling breeze—

* 7 *

She was bound high up on the northern seas —
She was bound high up on the northern seas —

* 8 *

O poor Ranzo, thought he’d be a sailor—
O poor Ranzo, thought he’d be a sailor—

Related to this sea shanty

Poor Old Reuben Ranzo

Lower The Boat Down

Tommy’s On The Tops’l Yard

Poor Old Reuben Ranzo

Interesting Facts about the Poor Old Reuben Ranzo

Now, Poor Old Reuben Ranzo is a shanty built around the dirtiest “sailor” who ever shipped – Reuben Ranzo. This Halyard shanty was one of the most rousing of all of the halyard shanties. This shanty due to the some of the themes was very popular amongst whalers.
This version comes from Cecil J. Sharp – “English Folk-Chanteys” (1914), is in Sharps’s book in the chapter “Pulling Chanteys” on page 37. Here oryginal comment from Sharp’s book:

No. 32. POOR OLD REUBEN RANZO.
Sung by Mr. John Short, at Watchet. This chantey is a very generally known one, and versions of it are to be
found in all the chief Collections. Who Reuben Ranzo was no one seems to
know ; Mr. Whall suggests that ” Ranzo ” may be a corruption of ” Lorenzo.”

* It is possible that English chanteymen learned the name from Scandinavian sailors, for I am told that Danish sailors often sing about Daniel Rantzau (1529-69), who commanded the Danish forces in the seven-years (or three- crown) war with Sweden (1563-70).

The source of the Poor Old Reuben Ranzo

The music: “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914).

The lyrics:  “English Folk Chanteys” by Cecil Sharp (1914).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 242).

The Record of the Poor Old Reuben Ranzo

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Poor Old Reuben Ranzo - notation

The full lyrics

Poor Old Reuben Ranzo. (Cecil Sharp)

O poor old Reuben Ranzo,
– RANZO, boys, RANZO!
O poor old Reuben Ranzo,
– RANZO, boys, RANZO!

* 2 *

O ! Ranzo was no sailor.
O ! Ranzo was no sailor.

* 3 *

He shipped on board a whaler.
He shipped on board a whaler.

* 4 *

He shipped with Captain Taylor.
He shipped with Captain Taylor.

* 5 *

The man that shot the sailor.
The man that shot the sailor.

* 6 *

He could not do his duty.
He could not do his duty.

* 7 *

He couldn’t boil the coffee.
He couldn’t boil the coffee.

* 8 *

The Captain being a good man.
The Captain being a good man.

* 9 *

He taught him navigation.
He taught him navigation.

* 10 *

We took him to the gratings.
We took him to the gratings.

* 11 *

And gave him nine and thirty.
And gave him nine and thirty.

* 12 *

O! That was the end of Ranzo.
O! That was the end of Ranzo.

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Boys Blow (Norwegian)

Reuben Ranzo II – Doerflinger

Roll The Cotton Down (F)

Reuben Ranzo II – Doerflinger

Interesting Facts about the Reuben Ranzo II – Doerflinger

Now, Reuben Ranzo II – Doerflinger is a shanty built around the dirtiest “sailor” who ever shipped – Reuben Ranzo. This Halyard shanty was one of the most rousing of all of the halyard shanties. This shanty due to the some of the themes was very popular amongst whalers.
Here is the Doerflinger version, his Shantyman sends him to South Georgia, which Stan Hugill think is an anachronism since Antarctic whaling didn’t commence until between the two World Wars after the South Sea cachalot became nearly extinct and new-fangled whalers began to search for a blue whale. The song that Stan Hugill mentioned is the “Reuben Ranzo (II)” on page 24 of the Doerflingers – “Shantymen And Shantyboys” (1951).

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).

The lyrics:  “Shantymen And Shantyboys” by William Main Doerflinger (1951).

Mentioned in: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 242).

The Record of the Reuben Ranzo II – Doerflinger

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Reuben Ranzo II - Doerflinger - notation

The full lyrics

Reuben Ranzo (II) – Doerflinger

Oh, pore old Roving Ranzo,
– Hay, RANZO, boys, a RANZO!
Oh, pore old Roving Ranzo,
– RANZO, boys, a RANZO!

* 2 *

Now, Ranzo he was no sailor.
Now, Ranzo he was no sailor.

* 3 *

So pore old Roving Ranzo,
So pore old Roving Ranzo,

* 4 *

Now they shipped him on board of a whaler!
Now they shipped him on board of a whaler!

* 5 *

Now the captain he liked Ranzo.
Now the captain he liked Ranzo.

* 6 *

So the captain taugh him how to read and write.
So the captain taugh him how to read and write.

* 7 *

He taught him navigation.
He taught him navigation.

* 8 *

When he got his first mate’s papers,
When he got his first mate’s papers,

* 9 *

He became a terror to whalers!
He became a terror to whalers!

* 10 *

He was known all over the world as
He was known all over the world as

* 11 *

As the worst old bastard on the seas!
As the worst old bastard on the seas!

* 12 *

He would take his ship to Georgiay,
He would take his ship to Georgiay,

* 13 *

And there he’d drag for sperm whale.
And there he’d drag for sperm whale.

* 14 *

He lost the only ship he had.
His first and last and only ship

* 15 *

Was the “Morgan”, and she’s known everywhere.
Was the “Morgan”, and she’s known everywhere.

* 16 *

Now, he’s gone to hell and we’re all glad!
Now, he’s gone to hell and we’re all glad!

* 17 *

Now, I’ve told you he was no sailor.
Now, I’ve told you he was no sailor.

* 18 *

He was a New York tailor.
He was a New York tailor.

* 19 *

Whether a tailor or a sailor,
Whether a tailor or a sailor,

* 20 *

He sure became a Ranzo!
He sure became a Ranzo!

Related to this sea shanty

Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version

Roll The Cotton Down (D)

Roll The Cotton Down (E)

Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version

Interesting Facts about the Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version

Now, Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version is a shanty built around the dirtiest “sailor” who ever shipped – Reuben Ranzo. This Halyard shanty was one of the most rousing of all of the halyard shanties. This shanty due to the some of the themes was very popular amongst whalers.


An intriguing fact about this song was theories about who it was the Reuben Ranzo, some shanty collectors have different theories about it. So namely were four theories:
1 – He was a native of the Azores, of Portuguese descent, and shipped in a whaler.
2 – He was a famous Danish hero of the sixteen century, a certain Daniel Rantzau.
3 – C. F. Smith claimed it was a Russian or Polish Jew with a name like Ronzoff – his “Christian” name of Reuben would certainly suit the bill.
4 – He was American Latin, a “greenhorn”, hence his first name “Reuben” – “Reub” or “Rube” is still used in the States to mean yokel or farmer.
This is the Stan Hugill version it is the combination of the verses given from A. Spencer, ex-American barque “Monongahela” and the Bosun of the “Garthpool”.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 240).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 240, 241, 242).

The Record of the Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Reuben Ranzo - Hugills version - notation

The full lyrics

Reuben Ranzo – Hugills version

Oooh! poor ol’ Reuben Ranzo
– RANZO, boys, RANZO!
Ooh! poor ol’ Reuben Ranzo
– RANZO, boys, RANZO!

* 2 *

Oh, Ranzo wuz no sailor,
He wuz a New York tailor,

* 3 *

Though Ranzo wuz no sailor,
He shipped aboard of a whaler.

* 4 *

The ‘Pierre Loti’ wuz a whaler,
But Ranzo wuz no sailor.

* 5 *

Ranzo joined ‘Pierre Loti’,
Did no’ know his dooty.

* 6 *

Shanghaied aboard of a whaler,
They tried to make him a sailor.

* 7 *

Ranzo couldn’t steer ‘er—
Did ye ever know anything queerer?

* 8 *

The mate he wuz a dandy,
Far too fond o’ brandy.

* 9 *

Put him holystonin’,
An’ cared not for his groanin’.

* 10 *

They said he wuz a lubber,
And made him eat whale-blubber.

* 11 *

He washed once in a fortnight,
He said it wuz his birthright.

* 12 *

They took him to the gangway,
An’ gave him lashes twenty.

* 13 *

They gave him lashes twenty,
Nineteen more than plenty.

* 14 *

They gave him lashes thirty,
Because he wuz so dirty.

* 15 *

Reuben Ranzo fainted,
His back with oil wuz painted.

* 16 *

The Capen gave him thirty,
His daughter begged for mercy.

* 17 *

She took him to the cabin,
An’ tried to ease his achin’

* 18 *

She gave him cake an’ water,
An’ a bit more than she oughter.

* 19 *

She gave him rum an’ whisky,
Which made him feel damn frisky.

* 20 *

She taught him navigation,
An’ gave him eddication.

* 21 *

They gave him an extra ratin’
An’ made him fit for his station.

* 22 *

They made him the best sailor,
Sailin’ on that whaler.

* 23 *

Ranzo now the skipper
Of a Yankee whaler

* 24 *

An’ when he gets a sailor,
Who’s iggerant on a whaler,

* 25 *

He takes him to his cabin,
An’ larns him navigatin’.

* 26 *

He married the Old Man’s daughter,
An’ still sails on blue water.

* 27 *

He’s known wherever them whalefish blow
As the toughest bastard on the go.

* 28 *

Hurrah for Reuben Ranzo,
Hurrah for Captain Ranzo!

Related to this sea shanty

Oh Blow Ye Winds I Like To Hear You

Blow Boys Blow (Norwegian)

Roll The Cotton Down (C) – Halyard Version

Mochyn Du

Interesting Facts about the Mochyn Du

Mochyn Du was probably the most popular capstan shanties among Welsh crews, on the ships hailing in the main from Liverpool. This song is a folk song under another name “The Black Pig”. Stan Hugill obtained these lyrics from H. B. Jones. Stan Hugill also states that were many versions of this song but not all of them were sung at sea.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 238).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 238).

The Record of the Mochyn Du

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Mochyn Du - notation

The full lyrics

Mochyn Du

Redodd Dico i Lluyncelyn,
Mofyn Mati at y mochyn,
D’wedodd Matti, O mar arw,
Mochyn-du syd bron a marw,

– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– Y mae yma alar calon,
– Ar ol claddew mochyn; du!

* 2 *

Melws iawn yw cael rhew seliscen,
O gig mochyn gyda thatan,
Ond y awr rhaid gwnaid heb hwnw,
Mochyn-du syd wedi marw.

– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– O mor drwm yr ydym ni,
– Y mae yma alar calon,
– Ar ol claddew mochyn
; du!

Related to this sea shanty

Blow Ye Winds (B)

Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations)

Hurrah Hurrah Hurrah!

Die Gute Alte Brigg (German)

Interesting Facts about the Die Gute Alte Brigg

The Den Gamla Bryggen or Svineper was the most popular pumping shanty of all Scandinavian. The original was the Norvegian, but also we can find the German and Swedish versions. Die Gute Alte Brigg is the German version of this shanty Stan Hugill took from Knurrhahn, taken down by Ludvig Dinklage. The footnote reads:
‘Old Scandinavian sailor song, of about 1800; known to many old-time seamen in other languages.’ It is given as a capstan song (gang spill).
An interesting fact about this song is that Stan Hugill gives us only four stanzas in his book, fortunately, I have in my collection Knurrhahn: Seemannslieder und Shanties both tomes, and in the second tome (Zweiter Band), on pages 46, 47, and 48 I did find an original song with eleven (!) stanzas, which is the fair length for capstan (gang-spill), shanty. So here we go I have the chance to reconstruct this shanty in full length.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Knurrhahn – Seemannslieder und Shanties” Richard Baltzer; Klaus Prigge; Knurrhahn-Lotsen-Gesangverein (1936) (Zweiter Band, page 46, 47, and 48).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 235).

The Record of the Die Gute Alte Brigg

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Die Gute Alte Brigg - notation 1
Die Gute Alte Brigg - notation 2

The full lyrics

Die Gute Alte Brigg

Einst segelt auf dem Meere, wohl eine alte Brigg,
ver rotet war’n die Planken und wakkelig das rigg.
Der reine Schwamm war sie, sie leckte Nacht und Tag,
Sie war des Seemans Schriekken, wohl keiner kam ihr nach.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Wenn sie segelt find wir da, ja sind wir da,
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Wenn sie segelt find wir da, ja sind wir da.

* 2 *

Kein kompaß, keine karte war jemals hier an Bord.
Wir steuern nach den Mäven, die fliegen auch nach Nord,
Wir steuern nach den Wellen und nach des skippers hut,
Jn Deilung mit dem Großbaum, der kurs ist dann gut!

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Denn wir gehen jekt in See, Ja jekt in See,
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Denn wir gehen jekt in See, Ja jekt in See.

* 3 *

Der Smutje war ein Askerl, sein kochen nicht weit her,
Macht hammelfleisch vom haifisch, dazu Stockholmer Teer.
Und dann sein Jrish Stew stank zehn Meilen gegen Wind,
Aus Mövendreck und Katten einen Dubbing er uns bringt.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Salch Tsichau-Tsichau ist immer da, ya ist immer da,
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Salch Tsichau-Tsichau ist immer da, ya ist immer da,

* 4 *

Jhr Skipper war ein Wikbold, er steckte voller Spaß,
Entweder tanzt er hornpipe od’r singt mit tiefem Baß:
“Ja ja, sie ist schon alt, ich lieb’ sie ja so sehr,
Die Brigg, die ist mein Mädchen, das schönste auf dem Meer!”

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Uns’rer Brigg ein hoch, Vivat!, ya ein hoch, Vivat!
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Uns’rer Brigg ein hoch, Vivat!, ya ein hoch, Vivat!

* 5 *

Wir hatten keine Lampen, doch war’s auch so im lot,
Wir nahm’n des Bootsmanns Rüker, der glänzte grün und rot.
Und eh’ die Nacht hereinbricht, steht er schon in der Rüst,
Ein tiefer Schluck vom Black and White, schon leuchtet seine Nüff.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Es gibt Whisky jekt auf See! ya jekt auf See!
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Es gibt Whisky jekt auf See! ya jekt auf See!

* 6 *

Und hat der Reeder Weig’nfest, dann gibt es manchen Jur,
Der Smutt kocht uns ‘ne Suppe aus einer alten Bur,
Er würzt sie mit ‘n Oerlock, ‘nen Seestiebel dabei,
Mit Seegras, kakerclatjes, das gibt ‘nen feinen Brei.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Den der Seeman kokt nach Lee! ya kokt nach Lee
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Den der Seeman kokt nach Lee! ya kokt nach Lee

* 7 *

Der Skipper hat ein herzlieb, das ist so round und fett,
Mit einer Toppnants-Talije wir schnüren ihr korsett.
Der Bootsmann singt ‘n Shanty, wir fallen kräftig ein.
Jhr Mieder ist aus Segeltuch, ist Bramtuch Tlummer neun.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– All uns Tauwack, dat bruukt, Se’! ya dat bruukt, Se’!
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– All uns Tauwack, dat bruukt, Se’! ya dat bruukt, Se’!

* 8 *

Wir hatten kaum noch Flaggen am Maste aufzuziehn,
Da heißten wir das Lorchen, das war rot, gelb und grün.
Der Dapagei wird wild, er schreit in einem fort
“Jch werd den Mast zersvhmetten, wenn ich häng’ noch mal dort!”

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– ‘s hängen federn an der Rah, ja an der Rah!
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– ‘s hängen federn an der Rah, ja an der Rah!

* 9 *

Der Skipper hat ‘ne Tane, die hat ‘nen schulchen Blick,
Sie könnt’ ‘nen haifisch töten, die Wach’ jagt sie zurück.
‘nen Sturm, den konnt’ sie bannen, das war ihr bestes Tun.
Sah er ihr Backbord-Auge, da schwieg selbst Gott Neptun.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Jekt sekt’s Drügel hier und da, ya hier und da.
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Jekt sekt’s Drügel hier und da, ya hier und da.

* 10 *

Wir waren kurz an Segeln, da sekten wir ‘n Sack,
Den heißten wir in Großtopp, dort schlug er niemals back.
Als Ballon bläht er sich im Winde prall und voll,
Und alle Möven krächzen: “Sind denn die kecle toll?”

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Wir gehör’n nicht mehr auf see, nicht mehr auf see!
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Wir gehör’n nicht mehr auf see, nicht mehr auf see!

11 *

Nun, Jungens, kommt das Ende von uns’rer guten Brigg.
Am holm von Kopenhagen träumt sie von ihrem Glück.
Mit vielen alten kähnen lieght sie da Bord an Bord,
für kaken und für Spaken der schönste heimatort.

– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Dele Strolche gibt’s jekt da, ya gibt’s jekt da!
– hei singt mit, hurrah! hei singt mit, hurrah!
– Dele Strolche gibt’s jekt da, ya gibt’s jekt da!

Related to this sea shanty

Den Gamla Briggen (Swedish)

The Fire Ship

A-Rolling Down The River

Den Gamla Briggen (Swedish)

Interesting Facts about the Den Gamla Briggen

The Den Gamla Briggen or Svineper was the most popular pumping shanty of all Scandinavian. The original was the Norvegian, but also we can find the German and Swedish versions. This is a Swedish version of this beautiful pump shanty, it comes from “Sang under Segel” (1935), Sigurd Sternwall’s Swedish shanty book. The Swedish version gives us the same story but has a different type of chorus. It is in “broken-down”, i. e. “spoiled” Norvegian according to the notes in Sternval’s book.
Fortunately for me, I have Sigurd’s Sternwall’s book in my collection and I compared Stan Hugill verses with Sternval’s ones, and I discovered that Hugills 4th verse doesn’t appear in Sternwall’s book, which must come from the J. Ingemarsson of Valberg (Shantyman which gives this version to Stan Hugill). Also, the tempo in the original song in music notation is 3/4 in Stan Hugill’s book 2/4. And last comparing value Stan Hugill gives us 8 verses (including a unique one from the J. Ingemarsson of Valberg), and Sternvall gives us 15.
The biggest dilemma for me was which version I should reconstruct, the obvious choice was Sigurd Sternvall’s version because his book is much rarer than Hugill’s “Shanties From the Seven Seas”. But because Hugill’s version contains this one completely unique 4th verse I will reconstruct Hugill’s print version.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 235).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 235).

The Record of the Den Gamla Briggen

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Den Gamla Briggen - notation

The full lyrics

Den Gamla Briggen

Udi Parmarentha der låg en gammel brigg,
Udi Stykker var hans sail, og udsliten var hans rigg,
– For ti-di-li, am-tam-ta, For ti-di-li, am-tam-ta!
– Vi hurra for den reisen naar vi kom till Langeland.

* 2 *

Foruden hvide lester var han sort som en ravn,
Det var en gammel vase, han var kjöbt fra Kjöbenhavn.

* 3 *

En hver ma nu vidden skuden var ej rar,
Forthy bogspröjtet var aabrekt det beste som der var.

* 4 *

Vi had ingen klyverbom, vi rigged ud en kolt,
Og folket orket ingenting, var udpint og sult.

* 5 *

Gallionen hun laa allt i veien for oss.
Hver gang vi skulle have voran klyvare loss.

* 6 *

Og spröjtet den peger i den himmelske sky,
Og atten aarhundrede siden den skudden var ny.

* 7 *

Kompass udi sitt nakterhaus, det har hun aldrig haft,
Vi stryde efter kullen på en gammel flossehat.

* 8 *

Nakterhuset var vel ett gammelt vejaskul,
Og ratten er gjort av ett gamelt rokkehjul.

Related to this sea shanty

Svineper

The Plains of Mexico (C)

Alabama II

Svineper

Interesting Facts about the Svineper

The Dirty Old Pig or Svineper was the most popular pumping shanty of all Scandinavian. The original was the Norvegian, but also we can find the German and Swedish versions. A couple of facts about this song, first Stan Hugill first time heard this song from shantyman Paddy Griffiths, who get this song from Norwegian barque. The second version that you can see here is Stan Hugill from “Opsang Fra Seilskibstiden”, but the tune Stan Hugill learned from a Norwegian sailor is called”Big Skan”. A third and most intriguing fact is that choruses are in five different languages.
In the Norwegian version, a play on words is very noticeable. There is mention of a “real” pig, but usually, more often the reference is to the skipper – a dirty old hog, i. e. Svineper.

The source of this sea shanty

The music: “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 232, 233).

The lyrics:  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 232, 233).

The Record of the Svineper

You also can find this record on my YouTube channel here or directly listen below. Additionally, if you want to share your opinion about the record or share your opinion you can do it in my Facebook forum here, or leave a comment at the bottom of this blog article.

The musical notation

Svineper - notation

The full lyrics

Svineper

Udi Parmerent i Holand, der laa en gammal Brigg,
Forsilten vardens skorg, og forsliten var dens rigg,
– Oberland, zum pao wand, Oberland zum par wand,
– Til Drøbak med han Svineper vi tidsnok Komme Kan.

* 2 *

Det fandtes ikke kompas eller mathaus ved dens ratt,
Vi styrte efter pullen i Per Svine’s gamle hatt;
– Ober land zum par wand, ober land zum par wand,
– Til Drøbak med han Svineper vi tindsnok komme kan.

* 3 *

Kahytten den var umalt, men ruffen der var god,
Og Køierne var malte med vaeggelusblod;
– Overland som tibrands, overlands som paa vand,
– Til Drøbak med den Griseper vi aldrig komme kan.

* 4 *

Skutesiden den ratten og daekket hak i hul,
Og ratten bare et gammelt kjaerrehjul;
– Overland som paa vand, overland som paa vand,
– Til Drøbak med den Grisper vi aldrig komme kan.

* 5 *

Vi matte pumpe laens imellem hvert et glas,
Og naar vi gik fra haven, skar vi katten ind til bras;
– Gi mig ranson paa vand, gi mig ranson paa vand
– Og fire mand i giggen satte Svineper iland.

* 6 *

Vi hadde ikke bramsel, vi heiste op et skjort,
Og jamen holdt det godt saalaenge veiret det var tort;
– Gi mig ranson paa vand, gi mig ranson paa vand,
– Og fire mand giggen satte Svineper iland.

* 7 *

Og baasmanden spytta, han sver og bandte paa,
At grastaug til taljerip fik’n aldrig til at staa;
– Hive langsomt fra land, hive langsomt fra land,
– Der Bergenske møer snart møte nok vi kan.

* 8 *

Og naar vi først var kommet et stykke ut fra land,
Drak Svineper mer braendevin end alle mand drakvand;
– Hive langsomt fra land, hive langsomt fra land,
– De Bergenske møer snart møte nok vi kan.

* 9 *

Det var Søndagsmorra, vi blev purret ut til baut,
Men naar vi saa i luka, laa kjølsvinet og flaut;
– Kors i Herrans namn, hur det går langsomt från land,
– Vi hurra for den resan, när vi kom til Köpenhamn.

* 10 *

Og engang i vekka vi melkevelling fik,
Da fik vi suge purka som om paa daekket gik;
– Kors i Herrans namn, hur det går langsomt från land,
– Vi hurra för den resan, när vi kom til Köpenhamn.

Related to this sea shanty

Way Stormalong, John

Santiana (A)

The Plains of Mexico (B)